jump to navigation

What an o(l)dd Glastonbury… June 29, 2009

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
trackback

So old. So old they all seem. Springsteen. Young. The Specials. Madness. Fecks sake, Status Quo, Francis Rossi, pony tail gone. And the youngest member of them who joined sometime after I paid attention looking… well… old.

This is what it means to be young. The camera as it panned the crowd seemed only to pick up on the bizarre divergence between those on stage and those off.

And don’t get me wrong. My God, Neil Young could do the smash the guitar to shreds and leave it wailing feedback as if he’d invented it. The Specials looked… well, Terry Hall and Co. looked like men who’d just found ska rather than long-timers working away at it. Springsteen and the band were as compelling as ever.

They rocked. Sort of.

But then look at Blur, dragged out with young Damon Albarn (two years younger than me as it happens) looking oddly haggard, the rest of the band looking… well. I wouldn’t put too much into the solo careers guys. Let’s put it that way.

There were other bands. The Prodigy. No, wait, they didn’t look that young either.

Moving to younger bands…Pendulum, a sort of Prodigy redux, all bluster and keyboards and Green Day nonsense in terms of song writing, but without the depth… which can’t be right.

Kasabian. I have to admit to a soft spot for them. But what possessed them to decide to dress like 70s rockers?

This must be a weird time to be young. I mean really young. Under 20. At least. A world inhabited by the grey or the greying.

I know someone who can’t talk yet, and whose only conception of ‘music’ is jigging along to the sound on a stereo. I wonder what she makes of it all. And what she’ll make of it as time passes? What sense of ownership she will have as this culture ages.

I know I sure as hell don’t understand it.

About these ads

Comments»

1. sonofstan - June 29, 2009

tell me about it – just after getting my still just about teenage daughter to turn down the music so I can get some sleep, grumble, grumble……and the racket in question? Dylan……

Like

2. WorldbyStorm - June 29, 2009

That’s not good. That’s definitely not good… ;)

Although it makes you wonder whether the guys who cried ‘traitor’ in the 1960s when he went electric (sounds quaint, doesn’t it?) didn’t have a point :)

Like

3. Phil - June 29, 2009

My son’s into “indie” and specifically Kasabian – I’d tell him they’re a huge Primal Scream ripoff, but I don’t think he’s heard of Primal Scream. Young lads, loud guitars, a bit of edginess in the lyrics – it all seems a bit dilute compared to what I was listening to at his age (this) but there it is. At least it’s not hip hop.

We had a classic My Uncool Dad moment last night, when he was changing channels after watching a video for a Killers song (which was brilliant, it has to be said) and stumbled on the last couple of songs from Madness at Glasto. I confiscated the remote & stood there grinning stupidly, occasionally muttering something like “no, come on, listen to it properly” or ” you’ve got to admit this is great”. He wasn’t impressed. The funny thing is, I didn’t like them myself when I was in my teens.

Like

4. sonofstan - June 29, 2009

At least it’s not hip hop.

Why not? at least HH is sonically aware that it’s not 1967/ 1994 anymore….

Like

5. Crocodile - June 29, 2009

‘This must be a weird time to be young. I mean really young. Under 20. At least. A world inhabited by the grey or the greying.’

It’s just that the focus of teen culture has moved away from music. Get three 14-year-olds in the back of the car and you will understand gratifyingly little of their conversation, because it will be about social networking sites and computer games and reality TV shows of which we know, and want to know, nothing.
Spare a thought, too, for the old, who can’t go to a match without being deafened by booming rock music, or turn on the television and see anything that isn’t aimed at the young. Cuts both ways.
The 16 year old bewildered by Glastonbury has a counterpart in the 66 year old (I know several) who is bewildered in the city centre, which has become a teen theme park.

Like

6. ejh - June 29, 2009

Spare a thought, too, for the old, who can’t go to a match without being deafened by booming rock music

Possibly the most annoying thing is the requirement for the presentation of trophies to be accompanied by fireworks and Queen singing We Are The Champions. Prior to this trend, of course, we had no idea that our team lifting the trophy actually possessed any significance and we should therefore be tremendously grateful that this has now been brought into the open.

Like

7. Phil - June 29, 2009

sonofstan – purely selfish reasons. When I hear young lads shouting about how miserable they are over electric guitars, I can at least remind myself that I used to like that kind of stuff – & I can usually hear a bit of Buzzcocks here, a bit of Joy Division there, at least once I’ve prevailed on the little blighter to bloody well turn it down. (Plus I can console myself that it’s not as extreme as my old Beefheart/Hüsker Dü/Swans LPs, never mind that I don’t actually listen to them any more.) Young lads shouting about how great they are over a massive hip hop beat… well, we didn’t have that when we were kids. Just a load of noise if you ask me. I mean, I’m not totally deaf to that stuff – I like a bit of Wu Tang from time to time & I’ve got both the cLOUDDEAD albums – but generationally speaking hip hop was never going to happen for me. I was at university by the time the Sugarhill Gang got famous; the first time I heard MC Hammer I had a mortgage.

Like

8. EamonnCork - June 29, 2009

Speaking as someone who turned 40 last year, it does seem odd to see a gang of teenagers being presented with stuff which seemed like kind of old hat when I was their age. I was reared on the whole post-punk thing (good to see the Husker Du namecheck, you should dig it out Candy Apple Grey still sounds great) and it’s strange to see how conservative someone like Kasabian sound, they’re less the new Primal Scream than the new Family.
As regards hip hop, someone berated me recently for still listening to it. But I was still in National School when Rappers Delight came out and nostalgia for a lot of people our age would be all the dance music we listened to in the nineties. Yet that’s kind of being written out of history and I now find myself feeling nostalgic about Neil Young albums which, to be honest, I listened to for the first time only a few years ago. It’s very good music but still . . .
Crocodile is right about music not having the hold on, (wait for it), kids these days. When I was young the kids who read books and were interested in what was going on in the world were generally ploughing their way through the NME or the MM as well. But it’s not surprising that it doesn’t have any resonance. POpular music has, to a large extent, had its teeth completely removed by the big record companies. Like the kind of radical street politics which accompanied it during its golden era, it’s mainly the stuff of nostalgia now. The current day pop world is a bit like that era which came between Elvis and the Beatles, your average pop band today are the heirs of Fabian, Adam Faith and various don’t spook the horses concoctions dreamed up by marketing men in the age of dross which ran from around 1959 to 1963. Only this time I think they’ve twigged it for good and it will never have any remotely counter-cultural edge again. Which would be a pity because our memories of pop music are some of the most powerful and resonant we have. Kids today will be left with the nostalgia of people even older than we are, i.e. the Walsh/Cowell type svengalis who run those reality TV programmes and point the unfortunate contestants in the direction of some nice cover version from the seventies or even earlier.
Anyways, enough ranting. Now where’s that Scraping Foetus Off The Wheel CD?

Like

9. Garibaldy - June 29, 2009

Not to get all economically reductionist (ahem), but surely this is just reflective of the fact that the older people who have failed to grow up and still think going to Glastonbury is cool have more money to spend, so it makes sense to do this. I saw the owner being interviewed about this last year or the year before, and he was quite clear about targeting an older audience. So instead of lamenting what the kids listen to, why don’t you all accept youse are old, and stop listening to all this shite in the first place? :)

Like

10. Ferenka Fred - June 29, 2009

There seems to be less identification based on what type of music you like now (I’m aware of EMO etc which just seems to me to be Goths 20 years on); back in the day there were Mods, Punks, Skins, Teds, Rockabillys etc, crossing over into Casuals, Soul Boys and whatever. There’s nothing like that now it seems. Not that I miss getting the shite kicked out of me for wearing the wrong badge but I’d never have discovered soul music if I hadn’t been a Mod and then getting introduced to other stuff through the other ‘cults’…
A Specials or Madness gig 30 years ago would have seen a lot of more trouble, wouldn’t have been at Glastonbury either of course.
Public Enemy’s ‘It Takes a Nation of Millions’ still stands up amid the dross of some of today’s hip-hop…

Like

11. ejh - June 29, 2009

stop listening to all this shite in the first place

Pop music: it’s a good introduction to music

Like

12. Bartholomew - June 29, 2009

In the last week there have been two threads lamenting the decline of public discourse over the last twenty years (Sarah Carey and the IMF) and now the same about music – the CLR has just turned three and is already having a mid-life crisis!

Happy birthday by the way. This site is the living disproof of the decline of public discourse in Ireland.

And on another subject entirely, there’s an exhibition of photos from Prague 1968 on in the Gallery of Photography, with projections at night also:

http://www.galleryofphotography.ie/exhibitions/koudelka.html

Like

13. Damian O'Broin - June 29, 2009

Kasabian? Seriously?

You have to admit though, Blur were pretty brilliant last night (and I would never have been a huge fan of theirs). Although it was slightly disconcerting to see Albarn wearing what seemed to be the exact same set of clothes as he wore during the parklife days.

All these old guys making music has me thinking that perhaps I was a bit hasty concluding I was too old to fulfill my dream of one day being a rock star. Maybe I should dust off that guitar and practice those G7 chords again. Anyone want to join me? We could aim for Glasto 2011?

Like

14. sonofstan - June 29, 2009

Although it was slightly disconcerting to see Albarn wearing what seemed to be the exact same set of clothes as he wore during the parklife days.

Was thinking that, and composing a long post about the disappearance of the future, the blight of post-modernism blah, di-blah….
Imagine though, in 1977 a band appearing on stage in the same clothes they wore in ’67? and not looking ridiculous? something is definitely awry with the eternal present.

Like

15. sonofstan - June 29, 2009

And D O’B,
A mate of mine has the perfect name ready for a band of ex-punkers enacting their mid-life crises through 3 chord trickery: (imagine it written in the font used by the Subhumans or Type O Negative as emblazoned on a million patches) ……..i give you Negative Equity…..

Like

16. Crocodile - June 29, 2009

While the rest of you were watching tv, my unfortunate 6-year-old niece was listening, horrified, to a drunken dad and uncles bellowing along to a
box of 30-year-old vinyl singles – The Starjets, Protex, The Members (‘This is the Sound of the Suburbs’). She liked Jilted John, though.

Like

17. WorldbyStorm - June 29, 2009

Negative Equity… :)

Protex… The Members… ah, the glory days…

I still love Husker Du, although I listen to them less often than I used to. And Bob Mould’s solo work I think is well worth a listen…

As for Kasabian, I really like their first album, Roses rip that it is. It sort of works. For me anyhow.

Like

18. Gypsy - June 29, 2009

You can count me in that group of o(l)dd people who haven’t grown up yet but then as John Peel was a bit of a hero of mine I don’t reckon there’s really much hope for me.
I enjoyed watching Glastonbury this year as I have done most years that I can remember. It’s still somewhere I want to go before I die.
OK so I’m only a year younger than EamonnCork but there would have been a fair few newish acts that I would liked to have seen and I think the BBC’s coverage tends to have one eye on the ratings (one reason why I was interested in knowing more about Freeview).
I’m sure the retroness of the main headliners this year had a lot to do with the Gallagher Brothers and their attack on Jay Z last year, although Dizzee Rascal this year showed there’s more than an audience for the genre.
I think with 20 different stage areas it can’t be all shite, there’s a bit of something for everybody even a céilí band were headlining one of the stages on Saturday night.

Like

19. Damian O'Broin - June 30, 2009

Negative Equity – I can see it now. Our first single could be a rip roaring 3 minutes of punk called Alternative Economics….

Was thinking that, and composing a long post about the disappearance of the future, the blight of post-modernism blah, di-blah….
Imagine though, in 1977 a band appearing on stage in the same clothes they wore in ‘67? and not looking ridiculous? something is definitely awry with the eternal present.

I was going to write a post about going to Glastonbury circa 1989 and having as headliners an American rocker who’s debut was released nearly 40 years earlier and a brit band who’s heyday was over a decade earlier until I remembered seeing Buzzcocks very near the top of the bill at the Reading Festival in 1990… Maybe things haven’t changed that much

Like

20. Niall - June 30, 2009

The Carling festival is where the cool kids go.

Like

21. EamonnCork - June 30, 2009

I’ve just accepted that I’m old. Mind you, that picture in the attic still looks pretty young and handsome.
I’m a great fan of Negative Equity, that double concept album, “It is what it is,” and “we are where we are,” are my favourites.

Like

22. sonofstan - June 30, 2009

Negative Equity – I can see it now. Our first single could be a rip roaring 3 minutes of punk called Alternative Economics….

followed by ‘Suspect (Financial) Advice’

Like

23. Damian O'Broin - June 30, 2009

Damn! – I was trying to come up with one for suspect device :)

Like

24. sonofstan - June 30, 2009

I can see this is going to be one of those bands with 5 lyricists and no one who wants to play bass….

Like

25. Crocodile - June 30, 2009

You could say a lot about 21st century Ireland just by rewriting the SLF songbook.
Who’s for a bellowed chorus of ‘What we need is an Alternative Ulster -(one in which the primacy of the wealth-generating sector and the need for public-sector reform have been acknowledged, going forward…’)

Like

26. Phil - June 30, 2009

strange to see how conservative someone like Kasabian sound, they’re less the new Primal Scream than the new Family.

You say that like it’s a bad thing. (Actually the Earlies are the new Family – and what are they up to these days?)

Like

27. sonofstan - June 30, 2009

You could say a lot about 21st century Ireland just by rewriting the SLF songbook.
Who’s for a bellowed chorus of ‘What we need is an Alternative Ulster -(one in which the primacy of the wealth-generating sector and the need for public-sector reform have been acknowledged, going forward…’)

‘Going Forward’ is definitely a prospect for the title of the difficult second NE album….

Like

28. Damian O'Broin - June 30, 2009

You could say a lot about 21st century Ireland just by rewriting the SLF songbook.

Who needs to rewrite it?

Why don’t they all just clear off
Why won’t they let us be
They make us feel indebted
For saving us from hell
And then they put us through it
It’s time the bastards fell

Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,367 other followers

%d bloggers like this: