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What you want to say… Open Thread, 21st November, 2012 November 21, 2012

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. Ivorthorne - November 21, 2012

Anyone else reading The Big Lie at the moment?

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2. CL - November 21, 2012

Walmart workers are planning to strike at 1,000 stores nationwide on Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/20/walmart-black-friday-strike-huffpost-live_n_2168257.html

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3. Gearóid - November 21, 2012

Éirigí adopt a not entirely satisfacory position on abortion. http://www.eirigi.org/latest/latest211112.html

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WorldbyStorm - November 21, 2012

Interesting outcome of their deliberations.

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Mark P - November 21, 2012

Pretty weak stuff coming from people who describe themselves as a revolutionary socialist party. They seem mostly concerned with not alienating their lifer members. At least now there’s a statable political difference between them and the IRSP to point to, I suppose.

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Wendy Lyon - November 21, 2012

éirígí recognises the reality that thousands of Irish women are already accessing abortion services overseas each year and that the additional financial and emotional cost of such overseas travel can be very considerable. éirígí does not believe the current legal situation in relation to abortion services in both the Six and Twenty-Six Counties to be tenable.

If that’s their criteria, their own policy isn’t tenable either since only a small minority of women have abortions for the reasons they deem acceptable. There would still be thousands of women travelling for abortion if this policy became law.

I note they haven’t updated their site with the 2012 Ciorcal Náisiúnta positions; wonder if they’ve put any women on it yet?

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4. Branno's ultra-left t-shirt - November 21, 2012

They have actually been moving rightwards for the last while- the ‘community and country’ crap during the Lisbon referendum for instance.

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5. Red Hand - November 22, 2012

‘The Big Lie’ is a great read. My only slight problem with it is that Kerrigan gives over a few pages to that pretentious tool Theo Dorgan. (Note to Theo- men over 25 should ditch the earrings).

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LeftAtTheCross - November 22, 2012

Red Hand, come on now, what do you have against earrings on a man? Out the with it. (Disclaimer, I ditched mine when I was 22).

‘The Big Lie’ looks like a suitable stocking filler for Christmas.

Incidentally, if you look up ‘big lie’ on wikipedia there’s the following extract from an OSS report on Hitler’s psychological profile (it’s allowed to mention H when its actually relevant, that’s not a breach of Godwin’s Law, right?):

“never allow the public to cool off; never admit a fault or wrong; never concede that there may be some good in your enemy; never leave room for alternatives; never accept blame; concentrate on one enemy at a time and blame him for everything that goes wrong”

It struck me that there’s more than a passing similarity between that and the political approach taken by some.

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Ivorthorne - November 23, 2012

Yeah, I have to admit that I didn’t find him particularly impressive.

I’m neutral on the Earring question.

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6. TheOtherRiverR(h)ine - November 22, 2012

Landlords have been complaining to Liveline about the impending doom of the traditional bedsit.
Liveline is clearly fulfilling it’s remit as a bona fide public forum for the mad, unsympathetic and downright doddery.

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7. doctorfive - November 23, 2012
CMK - November 23, 2012

Summarised version: the academic debate on the impact of minimum wages on employement growth is inconclusive but shaded by evidence that minimum wages have no discernible negative impact on employment. But we, at The Economist, KNOW!!!! in our bones that minimum wages destroy jobs so we’ll keep publishing these kinds of tendentious articles for as long as peo-ple keep buying our magazine. If you missed this article don’t worry there’ll be loads more in the future.

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8. irishelectionliterature - November 23, 2012

256 page Document about Anglo giving the Sean Quinn side of things…

http://anglothetruth.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/anglo-final.pdf

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9. Branno's ultra-left t-shirt - November 23, 2012
10. FergusD - November 23, 2012

Just came across this at http:///www.theregister.co.uk

It speaks for itself:

Australia has become the latest nation to decide it wants tech companies to pay more tax, after David Bradbury, Assistant Treasurer and Minister Assisting for Deregulation, declared Google uses a “Double Irish Dutch Sandwich” to pay as little tax as possible on its Australian operations.

Google paid just $AUD781,471 of taxes in Australia, on estimated revenue of $AUD1bn.

Bradbury’s declaration came in a speech romantically titled Towards a Fair, Competitive and Sustainable Corporate Tax Base in which he explained how Google minimises tax.

The Minister’s explanation of Google’s tax affairs is as follows:

“While the day-to-day dealings of Australian firms advertising on Google might be with Google Australia, under the fine print of contracts Australian firms sign with Google, they are actually buying their advertising from an Irish subsidiary of Google.

It is then argued that the source of this income – and therefore the taxing rights under our tax treaty – would be with Ireland rather than Australia. Despite Ireland’s relatively low company tax rate of 12.5 per cent, we have just started to build the sandwich.

The next step is to route a royalty payment from the Irish operating subsidiary of Google to a Dutch subsidiary of Google, which is then paid back to a second Irish holding company subsidiary of Google that is controlled in Bermuda, which has no corporate tax.

The first Irish subsidiary receives a tax deduction for the royalty payment to the Dutch subsidiary, substantially reducing the income subject to the 12.5 per cent Irish company tax rate.

Under Dutch law, and because EU member countries do not charge withholding taxes on transfers within the EU, the transfers to and from the Netherlands are essentially tax free.

And under Irish tax law, the second Irish resident subsidiary is not taxed on the royalty payment because it is controlled by managers elsewhere.

The profits from the sale of advertising to an Australian firm then sit in a tax-free jurisdiction – possibly indefinitely.”

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11. ejh - November 24, 2012

Just saw this on Twitter – the last survivor of the Battleship Potemkin mutiny (died 1987) ran a fish and chip shop in Dublin. Is this well-known?

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CL - November 24, 2012
ejh - November 24, 2012

That wouldn’t be exactly the same link that I posted, would it?

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Gearóid - November 24, 2012

That’s a great find.

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Michael Carley - November 24, 2012

I’ve certainly known it since the eighties, although Beshoff’s was still open as a chipper at the time. A quick search tells me that they are now an oyster bar in Howth..

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12. doctorfive - November 26, 2012

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