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70th Anniversary of the Soviet Victory at Stalingrad February 2, 2013

Posted by Garibaldy in Communism, History.
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Victorious Soviet Soldier at Stalingrad

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1. AS - February 2, 2013

From Robert Wyatt’s “Nothing can stop us”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fovNg6wTulk&list=PL6B4B9B1EF9805DB0

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2. Organized Rage - February 2, 2013

To paraphrase Churchill, it was not the end of WW2, not even the beginning of the end. But it undoubtedly was the end of the beginning.

For that alone humanity owes a great debt to the Red Army.

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CMK - February 2, 2013

+1

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3. LeftAtTheCross - February 2, 2013

An anniversary worth remembering.

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Garibaldy - February 2, 2013

More than most!

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4. Garibaldy - February 2, 2013
5. Branno's ultra-left t-shirt - February 2, 2013

Geoff Robert’s is an enigma wrapped in a mystery wrapped in a puzzle. Former communist and Soviet expert, Commonwealth enthusiast and scourge of Irish neutrality.

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WorldbyStorm - February 2, 2013

Do you know, I’ve been reading a lot about Vichy in the last few weeks. Something that struck me as absolutely remarkable was the fact that not merely the US, but also Australia and Canada, had diplomatic relations with it throughout its existence. Given the criticism poured over this state for its stance during that period the fact they’d have links with what was effectively a Nazi puppet (and on the part of the US actually champion Vichy Ministers and military personnel over de Gaulle right up to 1944 or so) is amazing. There’s much to be critical of of this state’s neutrality, but given the incredibly close military and intelligence links and economic links too which only closened during the war period there’s perhaps less than the Robert’s suggest.

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WorldbyStorm - February 2, 2013

Sorry, I should add that the point about the diplomatic relations is that although formally ‘neutral’ Vichy and Britain were engaged in open warfare across North Africa, the Middle East and in both the Mediterranean and the Atlantic.

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an - February 3, 2013

And not to forget the commercial relationships between American capital and German firms continued well into the second world war. They were, of course ,resumed shortly afterwards with firms like Daimler, Mercedes-Benz, Deutsche Bank, all predominantly staffed by ex-Nazis.

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6. Branno's ultra-left t-shirt - February 2, 2013

Another factor worth remembering is the substantial number of women fighters in the Red Army, as well as tank crews and airforce. No other Allied forces had women in combat roles.
The Nazi forces also included Italian, Romanian, Croat and Hungarian troops.

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WorldbyStorm - February 3, 2013

+1

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Anonist - February 3, 2013

The German media coverage tended to leave out the participation of other nationalities on the Axis side. And their collapse was key to the surrounding and eventual anihilation of the German 6th army. The consensus among German historians I heard was the war would eventually have been lost anyway, given the decision to invade the USSR, whatever the outcome of Stalingrad.

But above all we should remember the city is a graveyard to three-quarters of a million combatants and civilians killed in the battle.

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7. Tomboktu - February 3, 2013

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Tomboktu - February 3, 2013

(BTW: His symphony no. 7 is “Leningrad”.)

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