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From Spain: 23rd February 2013 February 26, 2013

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Economy, European Politics, From Spain, The Left.
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As ejh notes: “The failed coup of 1981, today’s mass protests on the anniversary and a mysterious mock-execution in a mountain village in 1984.”

What we did and didn’t see.

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1. Gewerkschaftler - February 26, 2013

Great atmospheric piece EJH.

And it’s true for much of Europe – given the wilfull surrender of democracy to the ‘coup of the markets’, how far are any of us away from martial law?

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LeftAtTheCross - February 26, 2013

Good question. Mind you there was a newspaper article the other day, seeking to re-assure international public opinion presumably, that an agreement had been made between the Greek generals and actually it wasn’t clear who the other party to the agreement was, but one suspects it must be the Troika, that there would not be any intervention by the army in the case of a further escalation of public unrest. Perhaps this statement was required by the Troika as a further privatisation measure, to leave the field open for Blackwater Inc. to step in to fill the void and enforce martial law. Blackwater shares must be dipping these days, what with the ramp-down in Afghanistan and Iraq, those quarterly earnings forecasts could do with a boost.

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Gewerkschaftler - February 26, 2013

More than possible the schock doctrine troops have their eyes on the prize. Germany continues to sell arms to Greece even while it is supposedly broke (military Keynesian stimulus is, as ever, acceptable to ordo/neo-liberals).

I’ve absolutely no time for Pasok but one thing Papandreou did before his unlamented departure was make changes at the head of the military. Perhaps with a view to lessening the chances of military intervention.

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2. Gewerkschaftler - February 26, 2013

Somewhat on topic the infuriated responses to the election SNAFU in Italy from CDU circles and their meeja mouthpieces here in Germany is making my day so far.

Note to editors: The Demos survey of supporters of Grillo and M5S here makes interesting reading.

I’ve no idea how the following blockquote from the Guardian will appear in the no-going-back comments editor but here goes:

Other findings of the research include:

Those surveyed are more likely to be male and to be older.
They are more likely to be well-qualified, with 54% reporting they had a high school diploma (compared to the Italian average of 41%), but are also more likely to be unemployed – 19% compared to the Italian average of 7.9%.
On average, they self-identify as left-wing: when asked to place themselves on a spectrum ranging from 1-10, with 1 being furthest left and 10 furthest right, the average score for respondents was 3.88.
When asked to name their top two concerns, supporters chose the economic situation (62%) and unemployment (61%). A distant third was taxation at 41%.
They are broadly positive about immigration: more likely than the Italian public in general to view immigration as an opportunity (56% versus 28%).

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3. Anne - February 26, 2013

Agree with the description of the typical 5 star Movement supporter/voter. Most of those I have known more or less fitted the profile. Add in some older very disillusioned lefties/radicals.
The 5 star movement’s achievement did not come overnight – they have been working hard on the gound and over the net for 4-5 years with daily messages from grillo, regular meetings, occasional spectaculars like the Fuck off days. The 5 stars refer to their 5 main proposals. They have been vilified in the Italian press and called anti-politics. Well done to them all and the people who voted for them!!

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Gewerkschaftler - February 27, 2013

Hallo Anne – it’s good to hear from someone with first-hand knowledge of Italy.

I was wondering today if our rulers won’t try to keep Monti as caretaker Gauleiter ruling by decree at least until after the German national elections. It would certainly suit them.

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4. ejh - March 3, 2013

Today: badly received. In which it is claimed on the BBC that “it is hard to get a receipt in Spain” and I point out at length that this is untrue,

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