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This weekend I’ll mostly be listening to… Microdisney – Everybody is Fantastic. May 22, 2010

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Culture, This Weekend I'll Mostly Be Listening to..., Uncategorized.
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What can be said about this group and this album that hasn’t been said before? Irish, early 1980s, sort of expatriate given that they moved to London sharpish from Cork. A marriage of the melodies of Sean O’Hagan and the sharp to dark black lyrics of Cathal Coughlan. But behind that a full band that made this more than just a duo.

The first album proper (‘We Hate You South African Bastards!” was essentially a compilation), “Everybody is Fantastic” was released in 1984 and it is so remarkably different to everything else of that time. It wasn’t post-punk, or rather it was, but it sounds now like something that fell back through a time machine from the 1990s or even later. A curious blend of brittle yet sunny pop, country[ish] inflections, and rage and sadness – the latter supplied by Coughlan. And in that they were very post-punk indeed. I’d almost argue that they and the Go-Betweens shared a certain approach (albeit in the case of the latter it was much much less angry and pointed).

Later albums saw an odd shift, ultimately on “39 Minutes” in 1988 towards a more commercial sensibility that kind of sort of didn’t work. I certainly don’t treasure the last two like the first two (although “Crooked Mile” is actually pretty good). And subsequent incarnations were, I think, a matter of taste. Both the Fatima Mansions and the High Llama’s had excellent moments, but… never quite achieved what the first two Microdisney albums did. On the other hand at least one can say that neither O’Hagan nor Coughlan stayed still.

It’s also worth pointing out that this was an intrinsically political band, both in terms of the personal (and working through the minefield of gender relations) and more broadly. That too added extra rage.

Any track from this album would do as well as the three selected below. ‘This Liberal Love’ with it’s incomprehension at… well, ‘liberal love’…. Before Famine which sweeps along (not dissimilar to Everybody is Dead), ‘Past’, ‘Moon’, ‘Dolly’, ‘Sun’… each of them perfectly worked 3 or so minute songs.

And here’s a curiosity. Somehow they managed, for me at least, to sum up before I’d even arrived in London a certain aspect of that city which six or so years later when I lived there seemed absolutely spot on.

I could go on, but what’s the point? Most of those who have heard them have loved them, and those who haven’t I can only recommend you start now. They’ve certainly been ill served by reissues over the years. And the compilations have been, broadly speaking, worse than useless. I still have the original vinyl, but it took some doing to get MP3s of the first and second albums.

Idea

Dreaming Drains

Everybody is Dead

And from the only slightly less better “the Clock Comes Down the Stairs”, the peerless ‘Goodbye, It’s 1987’

Comments»

1. sonofstan - May 22, 2010

I’d almost argue that they and the Go-Betweens shared a certain approach

Good spot. They shared a rehearsal space for a while and were good friends – we were supposed to be third on the bill at a joint headliner between the two around the time of the release of Liberty Belle but couldn’t do it for some reason I now can’t recall.

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

I did not know that. Remarkable. And yet it makes perfect sense. That’s a pity, I’d have thought you guys would have been an absolute perfect fit with both of the other bands.

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2. EamonnCork - May 22, 2010

Great choice. I know what you mean about them summing up an aspect of London. The piece in Loftholdingswood, “Dan Moran, A Rakish Hat, The Racing Form, Brandy Glass, A Gentleman,” always reminds me of days drinking in London pubs with some of the Irish lads who’d come over in the fifties, guys who hit the drink fairly hard but also maintained a certain dandyishness and were always on the verge of taking the bookies for a big score. There’s something about the music and the lyrics of that song which always put me right back there.
And in terms of the songs growing on you, when I was in my teens I heard This Liberal Love and didn’t really know what it was about. It would come to seem like the perfect sketch of a common predicament I hit later.
Equally, it wasn’t till I moved to Cork that I realised how quintessentially Cork the band were and how connected with that eccentric music scene in the city, records like All I Really Want Is A White Cortina by the Nun Attax, What Happened Your Leg by Five Go Down To The Sea, The Sugar Beet God by Cypress Mine, Yours Sincerely by Belsonic Sound. Hello Rascals in particular is like the soundtrack to a rueful rainy day in the city. And Love Your Enemy is a bit like the Roy Keane Saipan rant set to, wonderful, music.
Fantastic band not least because you could tell that Coughlan’s anger was genuine. The heavily produced stuff near the end is often glossed over but the lyric of Full Force Gale almost seems like an anticipation of the Tiger era when a lot of people did long to lord it like the rich folks did. And there is something marvellous about the first few seconds of Birthday Girl as you wait for them to sweep into the song.
Is it a breach of anonymity to ask SOS which band it is? I’m just interested in knowing if I’ve seen him live.

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sonofstan - May 22, 2010

The Stars of Heaven.

Was just thinking about the first time I saw ‘disney – Oct. 27th 1980 in the Arcadia in Cork, supporting the Fall, whose first gig in the free state it was (they’d played the Harp in Belfast before, I think). A trainload of us went down from Dublin. I met Giordai Ua Laoghaire for the first time on the train, still covered in the make- up he had worn when Disney supported Siouxsie in the Grand in Cabra the night before.

They were a 5 piece then, before slimming down to Cathal, Sean and a drum machine for MD mk 2 and the first couple of singles on Reekus. It was awesome stuff, and in terms of shock anyway, nearly overshadowed the Fall that night. I had a tape once of some demos from then – ‘Victory’, ‘National Anthem’ (there’s a truncated live version on the the Live at the Arcadia EP) and the glorious ‘Mitchelstown ‘ …. “Let’s go-o-o-o, down to Mitchelstown, where we can hang around…..” hard to explain, but a joyous ode to the absolute boredom of life in a Irish country town in the dark ages. With a killer Bernard Edwards style bass line. They were a very strange affair then: somewhere between the Pop Group, Defunkt and the Contortions, with the ‘Corkness’ that Eamonn notes permeating all of it. They were also absolutely hilarious company. Sean was doing his damnedest to be Nile Rodgers meets Skunk Baxter, whereas Giordai was being the Ovens Jimi Hendrix over the top. Most of the time the Rhythm section couldn’t keep up…. and Cathal chanting strange incantations – there was a song, the chorus of which wet ‘U Thant!, U Thant!’……. God I’m old.

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EamonnCork - May 22, 2010

The Stars of Heaven were one of my favourite bands, I think the first thing I ever heard by you was a demo of Eldorado which didn’t sound much like anyone else. And I had at one stage, if I remember rightly, a single with Clothes of Pride and All About You on it which is surely the best combination any Irish band ever managed. Like I said with This Liberal Love, it was a bit further down the line before Clothes of Pride started to make sense to me on a personal level.
Anyway, I won’t gush but just as Loftholdingswood achieves a kind of perfection, so does Sacred Heart Hotel when it swings into the line about being rakish of aspect and fond of a jar. And Folksong is great, and generally everything the band did. It’s an odd mnemonic thing that I could never pass the Sacre Couer Hotel in Salthill without hearing in my head those first chiming few notes of SHH.
I loved the Stars of Heaven despite the considerable handicap that they were the first band I ever heard namechecking country music as an influence. Given that I’d grown up in the heart of Country ‘N Irish country where the closest thing to a rock band we ever saw was Reform or Tweed, country was the enemy. And here were these dudes going on about Gram Parsons and Merle Haggard. So I have your band to thank for making Gram’s acquaintance. And for being alt-country, terrible term I know, before anyone had thought of the idea.

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sonofstan - May 22, 2010

I think the first thing I ever heard by you was a demo of Eldorado which didn’t sound much like anyone else.

Or like anyone good!
You had to pick my most embarrassing song ever, didn’t you?
Thanks, though.
And SHH was written about the Sacre Couer – I spent fair bit of my childhood in Galway.

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anarchaeologist - May 22, 2010

I always thought it was Dan McGrath! But the London thing is spot on. They did manage to articulate something about being Irish in London without being lyrically explicit with it. I always thought it was just me… And as you said, you didn’t ‘get’ the lyrics at the time, but years later something’d happen and you’d find yourself in a Microdisney song. There was usually drink involved mind you.

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3. EamonnCork - May 22, 2010

I really like El Dorado. Seriously.
And that’s cool about the SHH I never knew that.

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4. WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

Yeah, it’s lovely stuff. I think the alt-country is very true EC. It was way way ahead of the curve.

Also got to say I have a particular love for the title Before Holyhead which I presume was a joke at the Go-Betweens expense.

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5. Crocodile - May 22, 2010

…and somewhere in my spare room there’s a Peridots single….

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sonofstan - May 22, 2010

Looks like you might be able to flog it for the price of a good meal so…
http://www.discogs.com/sell/list?release_id=1411518&ev=rb

Me, I have about 10 of the little blighters : )

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Crocodile - May 22, 2010

Then you do a bit of short selling of Peridot futures, before dumping a few on the market to bring down the price. I’m not falling for that old trick.

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sonofstan - May 22, 2010

: )

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

Katmandu… I can make the future… I probably heard that twice in 1980 and I can still vividly remember the hook and the chorus (which were kind of the same)… it’s weird isn’t it? Sorry, for some reason the Peridots always remind me of Katmandu and yet there’s no connection I can think of!

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6. sonofstan - May 22, 2010

BTW, further to your original post, part of the reason why they’ve been ill-served with reissues is probably down to the fact that when Rough Trade went bankrupt in the early ’90s, all mastertapes owned by the company ended up in a receivers warehouse somewhere on a North London industrial estate. IIRC, Sean O’Hagan rang me to tell me this, and I think he might have managed to retrieve some MD stuff by going out there and hunting for it but not all of it.

can’t help on the Katmandu connection I’m afraid : )

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sonofstan - May 22, 2010

Sorry, he rang me because our masters were buried there somewhere too….and may be to this day.

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anarchaeologist - May 22, 2010

Does sonofstan get really annoyed every time he hears the Eircom ad on the radio, or are they paying you royalties for the first few notes?!

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

That’s disastrous re the tapes, although great that he managed to get out there. And there’s little point in transferring it from vinyl… I know some of the old Rough Trade stuff like Easterhouse was done like that to get it onto CD but it was pretty grim.

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Mark P - May 22, 2010

Easterhouse, like Marxman and allegedly McCarthy and Stereolab, were if I remember correctly politically influenced by the British RCP.

(In terms of British Trotskyist groups and musicians, there are photos of John Lennon selling the IMG paper. The SWP had the Redskins. Militant? Well unfortunately my lot only really had UB40. And later on one-hit wonder Whitetown).

On another note, I’d never heard of the Stars of Heaven until this thread. Indepedentrecords.ie has two albums by them available for presumably legal free download. In terms of 1980s bands who went on to be international rock colossi, it seems from a quick listen to a couple of songs that sonofstans lot had more in common with REM than U2. Which is a good thing.

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

I hadn’t realised McCarthy were RCPers… dear oh dear… which of course, given that they morphed into Stereolab makes me review both bands output entirely! 🙂

UB40? Oh dear oh dear… Saw them live in 88 or 89. Not awful, but not exactly great either to my ears – until ironically they launched midway through the gig into a sort of proto-rave thing that was brilliant. Then they stopped and went back to what they were doing. Not awful, but…

What’s the score with the Independent records thing?

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Mark P - May 23, 2010

The Whitetown song “Your Woman” was the only British No 1 about being a male MIlitant member in love with a lesbian. Personally I find it hard to believe that such an important facet of the human experience hasn’t found a more regular presence in the upper reaches of the charts.

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Seán Báite - May 23, 2010

Funny about UB40 Mark P. Ali Campbell – the lead singer, is the son of Brum folksiger Ian Campbell. The latter owned/or ran the folk club in the Jug of Punch in Birmingham and I’d always assumed he was in the CP… Understandably enough, his son, after a childhood and adolescence exposed to the folk acts passing through (including a lot of our finest) couldn’t stand folk at all – part of the reason he moved towards reggae-lite. Didn’t know he revolted politically too against the Da – very oedipal.
Also news to me about that Whitetown N°1 – ta for the info. Only vaguely remember it as a (fairly decent) chart curio from whenever it was (the 90s?). Agree there should be far more songs about that situation… Don’t think Jonathan Richman shows any Trotskyist tendencies in ‘I Was Dancing in a Lesbian Bar’ – does he ??

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7. anarchaeologist - May 22, 2010

You gotta call them ‘the Stars’ Mark, with a broad Dublin a. I used to dj in an Irish pub in Vienna in the ’90s and play them to death. Best Stars gig? perhaps the last one in the New Inn (?) but I remember a blistering lunchtime gig in the JCR above the front gate of Trinity in ’83/’84?

The strangest Microdisney gig was surely on a barge moored on the Liffey opposite the Virgin Megastore the day it opened. I think they’d just signed from Rough Trade to Virgin and great things were expected. I distinctly remember cycling across O’Connell Bridge that morning and seeing the barge being pulled up the river. My curiosity getting the better of me I asked the bloke on the tug what was happening. He told me it was a stunt and that some crowd called Microdisney were playing. He’d never heard of them. I thought it was some sort of elaborate joke but at lunchtime, there they were, in the middle of the river. Rock’n’roll…

The Virgin lps are still the subject of some controversy in this household, with Frau Dr anarchaeologist much preferring them to the earlier stuff. I remember negative comparisons to Steely Dan at the time but looking back on it now, it was as good as anything else of the period. BTW there was a good double CD compilation out last year which covers all phases apart from the earlier stuff (I’ve only heard the track on Caught at the Campus).

Mark P, enjoy the good weather, give the revolution a few days off and check out the Stars and Microdisney…

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

It’s weird. I only noticed the Steely Dan thing a couple of years back. I was listening to Everybody is Fantastic and suddenly went… ‘hmmmm….’.

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8. irishelectionliterature - May 22, 2010

May as well jump in with my Stars of Heavan praise too while everyone else is at it. For some reason the alt country sound sent me in the direction of Green and Red, The Rain Parade , The Dream Syndicate and other alt country bands of the time.
Having also had a period in Cork, there is a definite Corkness to Coughlans work, but I think that is a common trait among all Cork bands not just those of the time. You cant think of The Frank and Walters or Sultans of Ping without thinking Cork…. but thats Cork for you.
Microdisneys Town To Town video (them on the truck) was a great favourite, especially as it tended to come on in the middle of some awful songs that were on MT USA or shows of that ilk.
One of the strangest cover versions I have is ‘Everything I do I do it for you’ being done by The Fatima Mansions.

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WorldbyStorm - May 22, 2010

Rain Parade, Green on Red, Dream Syndicate… fantastic… Thin White Rope too and of course more trad minded Long Ryders… and Jason and the Scorchers… excellent.

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9. sonofstan - May 23, 2010

On another note, I’d never heard of the Stars of Heaven until this thread. Indepedentrecords.ie has two albums by them available for presumably legal free download. In terms of 1980s bands who went on to be international rock colossi, it seems from a quick listen to a couple of songs that sonofstans lot had more in common with REM than U2. Which is a good thing.

Not sure how to take either your ignorance of us or your provisional approval…..by the way, since you appear to like tracing bands with regard to their politics, I have to say that there were quite a lot of Labour party connections in the Stars…although then again, your glorious leader was also a member back then too. The downloads are perfectly legal and approved by us. The records were reissued early this decade, sold out, but are unlikely to require repressing.

On McCarthy and Tim Gane’s politics – I think you’re right about the RCP, but, while Stereolab were certainly engagé, a fair bit of it was a mixture of post- situ stuff from Laetitia and more than a bit of put on.

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Mark P - May 23, 2010

“Not sure how to take either your ignorance of us or your provisional approval”:

No insult intended!

My knowledge of the Dublin rock scene in the 1980s wouldn’t exactly get me a slot on Mastermind. In so far as I have a preexisting opinion on the subject it doesn’t go beyond a vague and possibly unjustified feeling that Gavin Friday is a cock.

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anarchaeologist - May 23, 2010

So Joe was third guitar or keyboards?

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sonofstan - May 23, 2010

He was kind of our Bez TBH – a bit of tambourine, some freaky dancing….

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Seán Báite - May 23, 2010

He was kind of our Bez 🙂 ‘king hell – next thing we know he’ll be walking away with some reality TV show…

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10. Wednesday - May 23, 2010

I know I’m in a minority on this but I’ve never taken to Microdisney. I bought a couple of their records back in the ’80s just because I felt I should like them, but never managed to. Gave them a listen again recently and nothing’s changed. I just find their songs very dull.

Surprised you didn’t know McCarthy were RCPites – thought they were more famous for that than for their music 🙂

Oh and that Fatima Mansions Bryan Adams cover that irishelectionliterature refers to is from the 1992s NME three-CD collection Ruby Trax which is full of… er… “interesting” cover versions.

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WorldbyStorm - May 23, 2010

I think that as they developed the later albums became a lot less interesting. Did you like the Fatima’s or the High Llama’s.

Re McCarthy, I only ever had one of their albums and had absolutely no clue they were RCPers. Not sure how that one escaped me. Interesting though how many people in music were RCPers. There’s a thesis in there at least.

Must hunt down that Ruby Trax. ‘Interesting’ sounds… ‘interesting’!

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Wednesday - May 23, 2010

No I didn’t really care for High Llamas or Fatima Mansions either, but if I had to choose one of the three I’d take the Fatimas.

I’ll copy Ruby Trax for you. It’s a mixed bag.

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WorldbyStorm - May 23, 2010

Really appreciate that… I always preferred the Llama’s over the Fatimas after the first year or two of the latter which I think is brilliant (not least because he covered everything in terms of sound, New Order like stuff, Big Black workouts, feedback, etc, etc).

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11. Seán Báite - May 23, 2010

Like Dan McGrath, WBS, you backed a winner for this weekend. Loftholdingswood – Jesus – just a perfect song – I hope they’ll play it on a loop during my liver transplant. I’d probably prefer that second LP to the one you’ve gone for. But love them all more or less (even the Virgins)
Maybe it’s because I have some Cork blood in me – but I can’t help noticing there used to be a peculiar genius in bands coming out of Cork. Must be 10 times the number of interesting bands per head of population than Dublin ever produced…
Also glad to see the wunnerful Stars popping up on the thread. Have fond and sad memories of that last New Inn gig too Anarchaeologist..
So talented a bunch were they, they were probably closet Corkmen.
‘Sipping lager beer, in a suburb of hell’ – they should start engraving that on the coins over there.
SoS the glorious ‘Mitchelstown I think they did that one in a Fanning session. There’s probably a version of it over on that fella’s quite dacent ‘Fanning Sessions’ blog.
Giordai Ua Laoghaire (sic – gan fada) Vaguely remember him being in an outfit in the late 90s called ‘Nine Wassies from the Bainne’ (sic again) that showed up in Dublin for the occasional gig. Have you or EamonnCork any recollection of that lot ? If the band were as strange as the name, must’ve been something to hear…

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12. sonofstan - May 23, 2010

Must be 10 times the number of interesting bands per head of population than Dublin ever produced…

Yes…in the heady days of Punk and the immediate aftermath, Belfast and Cork effortlessly outstripped Dublin – Rudi, the Outcasts, Protex, Ruefrex, and, despite some slightly silly lyrics, a tremendous live band then, SLF from the land of the Northern Whig- and Nun Attax -> 5 go Down to the Sea ->Beethoven, Mean Features (with Mick Lynch of Stump and Liam Heffernan, later Blackie Connors in Glenroe), Disney, and more, including the fantastically named Fla-Macs from the Banks.

Dublin had the Lookalikes.

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Ramzi Nohra 1 - May 23, 2010

i wonder if its a capital city/provincial city thing? Similar observations have been made re the contribution of Liverpool/Manchester/Birmingham to London.

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irishelectionliterature - May 23, 2010

Dublin in the latter part of the 80s did have plenty of interesting bands. A House , The Stars, The Gorehounds, The Babysnakes, The Golden Horde , The Slowest Clock , Paranoid Visions and even The Joshua Trio. You also had the Blades and then The Partizans (was Cleary involved politically?).
Nor too many jumped out at you and said Dublin though.

Yet looking at The Line up for Self Aid from 1986, had it been a few years later the line up would probably have been better

http://irishelectionliterature.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/self-aid-17th-may-1986-rds/

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WorldbyStorm - May 23, 2010

That’s very true…IELB. Much better.

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13. Wednesday - May 23, 2010

Meant to add a comment regarding White Town’s “Your Woman” – that song’s particular lyrical theme also appeared in a much earlier tune of theirs called “We’ll Always Have Paris” (sample lyric: Boys are boys and girls are girls / I love you but you love her ). Clearly the sign of a man with unresolved issues.

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14. John Green - May 24, 2010

I saw Nine Wassies from Bainne supporting Fatima Mansions in Dublin about 12 years ago. A magnificent gig. Bought their album on the basis of it. From what I recall (poorly), all the cheerful lyrics were accompanied by music appropriate for dirges, and vice-versa, which I found hilarious at the time. Had a chat with them after the gig and they were both surprised and delighted that someone had enjoyed their performance, so they have a special place in my heart, as do FM.

There’s a video documentary on C&S about Cath Coughlan’s project for the Cork City of Culture thing back in 2005:

http://counago-and-spaves.blogspot.com/2010/04/adventures-of-flannery.html

The influence of Walter Benjamin on the project is discussed in some detail.

Always liked UB40. Initially it was Brummie partisanship, but later, about 1981 I think, they did a benefit gig at Woolwich Odeon for the Autonomy Club, the anarchist centre in Wapping. They finished gigs a few times with the line “Love, Peace and Anarchy” in those days. I think they were confusing themselves with Crass. 🙂

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15. anarchaeologist - May 24, 2010

There’s a load of Microdisney stuff available for download here http://www.bubbyworld.com/microdisney/micromp3.htm

The quality isn’t good but as an indication of their wide tastes they include covers of ‘No Christmas for John Keys’ and the Isley Brothers’ ‘Harvest for the World’.

Meanwhile, check out Julian Cope’s assessment of the band and ‘Crooked Mile’ here http://www.headheritage.co.uk/unsung/review/1299 meanwhile, Andrew Mueller reviews the Daunt Square compilation here http://www.andrewmueller.net/display.lasso?id=116

It’s spinning now behind me as I write, another day wasted thanks to the good folk at the CLR! Now, I wonder if there’s a live tape of the Stars out there somewhere?

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16. BH - May 24, 2010

‘You also had the Blades and then The Partizans (was Cleary involved politically?).’

The Blades had broken up by 1986 but were supposed to reform for ‘Self-Aid’ but Cleary refused, objecting to it on political grounds- letting the system off the hook etc. If I recall correctly he played the Labour Youth (Militant) protest gig instead. The Blades were pretty ‘Dublin’, Ringsend in fact and every time I hear Downmarket it reminds me of dole queues.

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sonofstan - May 24, 2010

If I recall correctly he played the Labour Youth (Militant) protest gig instead

I remember we were asked by Eamonn McCann to do a anti-Self-Aid, which was unlikely to be associated with Labour Youth – we couldn’t do it because we were in London: still, it’s perfectly possible there were two protest gigs!

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17. BH - May 24, 2010

‘it’s perfectly possible there were two protest gigs!’
There were. There was a Militant one and an SWM one. McCann asked you to do the ‘Self-Aid makes it worse’ gig.

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18. Ciaran O'Brien - May 24, 2010

Paul McLoone on Today FM has just played the Blades and the Stars of Heaven back to back: does he read CLR?

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WorldbyStorm - May 24, 2010

🙂

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19. Chet Carter - June 9, 2010

Mark P – Marxman didn’t have anything to do with the RCP. They did seem quite close to Militant and were down Brick Lane on Sunday mornings with them when the National Front were trying to establish a presence.

Irish Election Literature – you are right, there were some really good bands playing the pubs and clubs of Dublin in the mid eighties. Another couple of favourites of mine were the Wilderness Years and Commotion who had a great black and red Jim Larkin poster to advertise their gigs.

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WorldbyStorm - June 9, 2010

I think I remember that poster Chet.

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