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This Weekend I’ll Mostly be Listening to… Bad Karma Beckons December 4, 2010

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Culture, This Weekend I'll Mostly Be Listening to..., Uncategorized.
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Some of you may remember the [at least two of you will definitely remember it] Weird Weird World of Guru Weirdbrain compilation released on Hotwire Records in 1985.

Yes, another production of the curious intersection between punk, garage and compiler Eamonn Carr [with no doubt Aidan Walsh and Robert Anton Wilson somewhere in the wings if only in spirit] that manifested itself in Ireland during this time. It’s a compilation with a raft of bands both known and unknown [as noted in the link above, there’s no end of pseudonyms], look here it’s the Golden Horde, The Gorehounds, Shark Bait, the Barracuda’s, Paranoid Visions and over there, there’s the Stars of Heaven!

But me being me the tracks I liked best were the aforementioned Stars, The Golden Horde, Thee Amazing Colossal Men and in particular Bad Karma Beckons, who I subsequently learned were a UK garage band – by the way looking for some of the tracks of various bands it’s amazing… ahem… how much is simply impossible to get online either in legal format or… otherwise. Which is sort of sad because while no one would argue that all the sounds were revolutionary many had a real energy and wit that even a quarter of a century later gives them a certain something.

Liking Bad Karma Beckons makes sense since the track “Beach Boy” was an inspired mix between… the… er Beach Boys and the Pistols [right down to a phrase stolen more or less directly from them]. You like that? Then you’ll love their only album ‘Mutate and Survive’, all arch intros and shouted vocals…

Nothing comes close to Beach Boy, but there’s no end of craic in the efforts made. Perhaps typified by the name of the album they released at the same time ‘Mutate and Survive’, a play on this.

I make no great claim for this music except that it’s sort of fun [and for any Fleshtones fan it sort of hits the spot]. They passed out of sight and mind soon afterwards with various members popping up in successor groups, most recently apparently The Phobics, last sighted playing support to John Otway.

None of this makes sense, needless to say. But the songs are all around or about 2 and a half minutes. Which I strongly approve of when it comes to guitar based music.

Meanwhile, here’s another psychobilly/garage band which we’ve covered in this series with an Eamonn Carr link.

Enjoy [particularly on a day where there remains piles of snow outside the window…].

Beach Boy

Do Da Snake

Can’t Stop

Teenage Werewolf’s Bridge

Nobody Home

Comments»

1. sonofstan - December 4, 2010

The Eamonn Carr connection was more direct with BKB – his Brother Jude played (and sang?) with them. They also features Carol of the Boy Scoutz, an all ‘girl'(as we would say then) punk band, who were sadly never – to my knowledge – recorded. She looked and sounded like a female Johnny Thunders……

Jude Carr was one of the two people behind Heat fanzine, easily one of the best things to come out of Punk in Dublin and which was closed down by a lawsuit from Paul McGuinness because they were unkind about his little lambs. Start as you mean to go on was always the way in that camp. Of all the things I lost in the great maternal clear out of our basement, copies of Heat are among the most regretted.

In a rather typical EC move, I don’t have a copy of the Guru Weirdbrain LP because, after being given one, he took it back because he’d run out of promo copies!

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Ahah!, that I did not know. The tentacles spread even further and deeper than I realised!

I love the way scenes – well, such as they were, developed by familial connections, etc, brilliant.

What a lovely shower McGuinness et al were, eh?

That’s a pity about the LP, it’s kind of rare.

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2. Crocodile - December 4, 2010

http://www.myspace.com/eddarragh
Read ED’s biog for more on some of the above.

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3. EamonnCork - December 4, 2010

Mighty stuff. I remember The Gorehounds fondly, in particular their version of Ruby Don’t Take Your Love To Town.” The substitution of the line, “It wasn’t me who started that ole crazy Asian war but I was proud to go and do my patriotic chore,” by “It wasn’t me who strated that ole crazy Asian war, but I was proud to go and get both of my legs blown off,” makes me smile to this day. I also had a great fondness for the Golden Horde, particularly the deranged ballad, “dig.” I think this compilation and the Underground scene, literally because most of the bands played in the Underground on Dame Street, comes just at the point before people realised, in the wake of U-2, that there might be major money to be made out of rock music (remember all those national paper features about how once rock and roll was full of dodgy hairy bastards but these days it’s a viable career choice). Hence the quirkiness and originality of the bands represented here, most of whom were almost wilfully uncommercial, was replaced by a crop of bands writing anthemic pompous songs which were designed to be heard in a stadium with 100,000 people in it. I like U-2 musically but like John McGahern terrible things were done by their imitators.

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Never much warmed to U2. Liked the early two albums, and a few bits and pieces along the way but always found it hard to see past Bono.

Loved the Golden Horde, even or despite their appearance as support at almost every alternative/indie/post punk act between 1984 to… x.

Dublin Opinion has a raft of stuff relating to the Underground and Conor et al have loads of material on that scene.

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Mark P - December 4, 2010

I don’t like U2, but your last part here certainly struck a chord.

It’s only relatively recently that I realised that there was Irish music in the period between punk and U2 which didn’t sound like most of the Irish rock music of my childhood. Which is to say, it didn’t sound like sub-U2 pomp rock shite.

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4. Alastair - December 4, 2010

I’ve still got my copy. But I’ve also got the Golden Horde / R.A.Wilson discs too. Post-punk novelty records need all the support they can get.

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Me too. I’ve never found a rip of Guru Weirdbrain online to go with the vinyl, but the GH/RA Wilson disc I did some while back. Low rate but good with it!

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Though I should add that if there were legit ways of getting this stuff I think there’d be a market.

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5. irishelectionliterature - December 4, 2010

Some great tunes there wbs.
Some brilliant bands on that compilation too. I Loved the the Stars ,and always enjoyed seeing the Gorehounds and The Golden Horde.
The Amazing Colossal Men had some wonderful tunes, Paranoid Visions had some gank but “The Other half Lives” is one of my all time favourites.
The Babysnakes were also brilliant. Their song ‘Cabra West’ is also one of my all time favourites. I’ve their ‘Sweet Hunger’ album at home.
As an aside was dragged to my daughters schools “Christmas Fair” last weekend and what did I find only ‘Comet EP 1’ 🙂

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

More collectors items!

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6. Jeremy - December 4, 2010

Wild to read about all this obscure shit. I wrote a song about Sky Saxon that Simon Carmody covered with the Horde. U2 I think should be tried for crimes against music.

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sonofstan - December 4, 2010

Real pop star alert!

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Nice one Jeremy.

Real pop stars? Surely not sonofstan!!! 😉

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7. sonofstan - December 4, 2010

‘Real’ = ‘was on TOTP’

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

🙂

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8. anarchaeologist - December 4, 2010

Simon Carmody and Jeremy Gluck. Separated at birth?

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9. anarchaeologist - December 4, 2010

I was always under the impression that, excepting the obvious candidates, most of the bands on that album were made up, including BKB? Anyway, thanks WBS, great memories of mad Horde gigs when they were still good (i.e. before Bernie and Donal left and they started behaving like hippies!).
Another piece of plastic worth seeking out is the 12″ recorded in the Underground in ’85 with a blistering version of ‘Hey Little Child’. Is this the Stars’ only live recording…?

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10. anarchaeologist - December 4, 2010
WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

“great memories of mad Horde gigs when they were still good (i.e. before Bernie and Donal left and they started behaving like hippies!).”

+1

Funny thing is that for years I thought the same as you re Bad Karma Beckons being made up. I was sort of glad they weren’t, though was a bit sad that an untapped vein of Irish surf rock/punk remained just that… untapped bar that one shining moment of Beach Boy!

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11. Alastair - December 4, 2010

“Meanwhile, here’s another psychobilly/garage band which we’ve covered in this series with an Eamonn Carr link.”

The Stingrays also did regular gigs with the Horde in the UK, and collaborated with them on the Horde/R.A.Wilson ‘Duane Ripley & his Go Go Set’ EP.

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12. WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Didn’t know that. Had no idea they were so inter-related.

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13. sonofstan - December 4, 2010

Kinda scary this.

Apart from WbS and EamonnCork, Ive no idea who any of you are, and yet it appears we might all have stood beside each other in the Underground on a Saturday afternoon, long, long ago….

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LeftAtTheCross - December 4, 2010

No, the world isn’t that small, I wasn’t there…but my brother probably was…

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

You say that now… 😉

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Yes. Yes it is.

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LeftAtTheCross - December 4, 2010

No, I was never in the Underground, honest 🙂

The brother played there though I believe, goth band, The Garden Hasn’t Changed Much. I would have been over in London a the time so I missed all of that scene.

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WorldbyStorm - December 4, 2010

Hmmm… a goth band?

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CMK - December 4, 2010

From 1987 to 1989 spent a couple of dozen Saturday afternoons in The Underground and played there twice.

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anarchaeologist - December 4, 2010

You’d be a ‘nodding acquaintance’!

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anarchaeologist - December 4, 2010

Oops, that should’ve come in after sos’s last comment…

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14. Chet Carter - December 6, 2010

Jude Carr moved to London in the early eighties after McGuinness closed Heat magazine down. Unfortunately, U2 did not discover humour and irony until the early nineties. After U2 became a successful stadium rock act, it is alleged that Bono put Simon Carmody on the payroll to act as his mentor in what was hip and rock n roll. Too late, Simon could have told Bono that sueing hip little rock n roll fanzines was neither hip nor rock n roll.

It’s a pity that Jude moved to London because he would have started a little record label to document some of the bands that emerged from the Heat/Morans Hotel/Radiators from Space/Sound Cellar scene. Those gone and long forgotten included the Boyscoutz, the Fabulous Fabricsthe Kamikaze Kids, The Modern Heirs and the Sinners (singer Tony Pugh is now a House music DJ in Dublin) and the Jagz.

The Jagz bass player John Byrne of the RTE Guide went on to form the Commotion, a mod/pop band that a had a nice little scene in Tommy Dunnes Tavern in the mid eighties. Eamonn Carr also documented this scene with the Hip City Boogaloo LP in 1985 that featured garage type, mod, pop, freakbeat stuff like the Commotion, the Fontaines, Side One, the Temps and Light a Big Fire.

After Bad Karma Beckons Jude formed Helltrain who made a Johnny Thunders/Ramones like noise. They released a couple of LPs one which featured the stomping track Seven Brides for Jerry Lewis. He also ran one of the second hand record shops in Hanway Street off Tottenham Court Road. Between drinking in the pub next door, abusing anyone who asked for U2 he managed to sell the occasional record. He has disappeared off the radar but is supposed to be living in South London.

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sonofstan - December 6, 2010

The Jagz bass player John Byrne of the RTE Guide

….now also Shamrock Rovers’ PRO.

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EamonnCork - December 6, 2010

I remember The Commotion having a fantastic single called Don’t Say Goodbye Today which was always being played on Fanning. The singer was, I think, called Therese Kenny and had a terrific voice. The Commitments are pretty transparently based on The Commotion or at least the idea of them, Roddy Doyle has said as much. Light A Big Fire were a fine band too, though I remember that the Fanning demos of CIA for example sounded much better than the somewhat over produced album versions. I See People was another good song, if a bit derivative of I Want To Be Your Boyfriend by The Ramones. Singer Thomas McLoughlin wrote for Fair City but did also write a good play called Greatest Hits.
You know there’s a terrific book to be written about that whole post-punk scene in Dublin, The Teen Commandments, Eugene, Chant Chant Chant and the bands, whose names escapes me, who recorded ‘Thinking About The Sun’ and ‘6.05.’ All that creativity, all that talent. Someone should do a Simon Reynolds on these groups. And Stano. Content To Write In Idine Weathercraft, Seducing Decadence In Morning Treecrash. They don’t write them like that anymore.

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Joe - December 6, 2010

‘Thinking About The Sun’. I think that was The Spies, originally The Dark, from Howth. Another one I remember from them was “Let’s go insane”. I was never in the Underground but I did see The Dark/The Spies on a few very pleasant Sunday afternoons in the Summit Inn.

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15. Chet Carter - December 6, 2010

Yep, John is a life long Hoops fan. I am sure that he will ask for ashes to be scattered in Tallaght. Or alternatively be buried with his Beatles LPs,Punk singles and a bottle of the finest red wine.

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EamonnCork - December 6, 2010

Do you ever wonder if there’s some kind of correlation between League of Ireland, excellent taste in arcane music and left wing politics. I’d be very surprised if we ever get a This Weekend I’ll Mostly Be Listening To . . . Garth Brooks. Or The Sawdoctors.

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Joe - December 6, 2010

Hey! I like the Sawdoctors. Reformist alert! Reformist alert!

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EamonnCork - December 6, 2010

You will have plenty of time to listen to the Sawdoctors while performing socially useful work in the camp on Tory Island.

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Joe - December 6, 2010

To which the people of Tory shout NIMBY!

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WorldbyStorm - December 6, 2010

Wait, my love of Garth Brooks fantastic music… nah, can’t even pretend.

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Crocodile - December 6, 2010

‘Do you ever wonder if there’s some kind of correlation between League of Ireland, excellent taste in arcane music and left wing politics’
It’s a hankering after authenticity.

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Mark P - December 6, 2010

You just made this Trot Shels fan and snotty music enthusiast wince.

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sonofstan - December 6, 2010

It’s a hankering after authenticity.

Or elitism 🙂

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16. Chet Carter - December 6, 2010

Agreed, spent many a chilly Sunday afternoon on the terraces of Glenmalure in the eighties discussing obscure soul records and whether it was OK for a lefty to like Merle Haggard. Watched a bit of the football too.

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EamonnCork - December 6, 2010

Anyone with ears has to like Merle Haggard surely, Fighting Side Of Me notwithstanding. Am I completely imagining this or did The Stars Of Heaven used to do a version of Sing Me Back Home?

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sonofstan - December 6, 2010

did The Stars Of Heaven used to do a version of Sing Me Back Home?

Yep, we sure did. Though we copied it off the Burritos version, rather than the original – I’m not a big one for completism – musical ADD – but I’ll buy any cheap Merle Haggard LP I see. Fantastic singer, up there with the Al Greens and Bobby Blands: people always go on about George Jones being the greatest country singer, but I make at least a draw.

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17. Chet Carter - December 6, 2010

Eamonn, I know that John and the rest of the band winced at the idea that they were being compared to the Commitments. They wrote most of their own songs and the covers they did tended to be quite obscure sixties soul numbers and not the dreadful Pub Rock by numbers stuff that featured in the Commitments film. Roddy Doyle went on to write some very fine books but the Commitments was naff. John does feature in the crowd scene at the end though.

I am very dubious about the Irish are the blacks of Europe line. We certainly don’t share the same talent for music. Most of the contemporary rock/pop music that we produce and sell is crap – Boomtown Rats, Boyzone, U2, Westlife, add your own choice. And that is what makes all the underground stuff that you mention interesting. There must be room for a Nuggets type compilation. I loved Chant Chant Chant. I always enjoyed their support gigs to the Blades in the Magnet.

There is a class theory here. U2 all came from middle class backgrounds and saw rock n roll as a business. They approached rock n roll as if they were a firm of accountants. If you worked hard and had a business plan you would succeed. The fact that they couldn’t write songs and were a lame New Wave imitation of Penetration and Joy Division was never going to hold them back.

Where as the working class Blades, who where from the same scene and era, were far more talented. But they never had the self confidence to make the next step from being local heroes.

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18. Crocodile - December 6, 2010

Chant Chant Chant? ‘Waiting in the Woods’.
I’ve never been too keen on attributing U2’s success to class. They’re just an anomaly; hundreds of other bands-most-likely-to succeed were equally middle class but got nowhere. And the personalities of Bono and Brady (go compare) had more to do with their different paths through the music biz jungle than their backgrounds had.

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sonofstan - December 6, 2010

Brady = Cleary?

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irishelectionliterature - December 6, 2010

Speaking of Cleary…
The band that keeps on giving. Twenty five years after recorded, a single from The Blades sees the light of day…..
http://comeheretome.wordpress.com/2010/12/06/the-blades-building-a-wasteland/

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Crocodile - December 6, 2010

‘Brady=Cleary?’
Mmm… too much time spent headbanging to the Johnstons.

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19. Dr. X - December 6, 2010

“Riddle of the 48 year old teenager’.

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WorldbyStorm - December 6, 2010

I’ve always disliked the assumption that one ‘grows out’ of things, casts them away like a skin, that there’s some sort of pre-programmed cultural evolution that we have to follow or else.

Far too many people I knew ten or fifteen years ago when I and they were in their early 30s nodding sagely over various coffee table dance and jazz records made me profoundly suspicious of such supposedly predetermined courses (even if some of the jazz was and remains pretty damn good).

If something has some intrinsic worth it should retain that quality, should indeed be of interest, at all stages in a life.

If it’s not, it won’t.

And that goes for the Undertones and MFA as much as Mussorgsky.

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Tomboktu - December 6, 2010

But you do want to grow out of this:

http://tinyurl.com/23jgerp

🙂

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20. Dr. X - December 6, 2010

‘MFA’?

Genuine question; even if something is of ‘intrinsic worth’ why should it be of interest to all individuals at all stages in their lives?

And sorry if I touched a nerve there. . . but in the immortal words of Lemmy Kilminster, ‘I never said I was a nice person’.

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Mark P - December 6, 2010

I’m not sure that anyone is saying that it “should” be of interest to all individuals at all stages in their lives so much as that there’s no particular, inherent, reason why it should cease to be of interest.

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Dr. X - December 6, 2010

I suppose those of you who enjoyed your youth might well want to relive it.

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21. Worldbystorm - December 6, 2010

Sorry my initial point should have noted people nodding over jazz who five years or ten years later would no more listen to it than fly.

It’s not a nerve, it’s the dismissive approach that mine or any other persons cultural life has to conform or not to some pattern and that to stray outside that is somehow being childish. I would never slag off someone whose sloe focus is jazz or classical music not least because I find that admirable in this day and age but also because theres a lot of jazz and less but still a substantial amount of classical that I love.

As regards intrinsic worth Ill give you an example for one reason or another

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22. Dr. X - December 6, 2010

>>>It’s not a nerve, it’s the dismissive approach that mine or any other persons cultural life has to conform or not to some pattern and that to stray outside that is somehow being childish.

I was not being dismissive, I was merely trying to inject a note of levity into the thread.

‘I only wanted young Ringo to enjoy himself’, as Wilfred Brambell says in ‘A Hard Day’s Night’.

Mahler, I’m sure, would have agreed.

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Dr. X - December 6, 2010

Oh, and check this out:

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23. Worldbystorm - December 6, 2010

Sorry lost connection, my example… I’m reading a lot of childrens books, the Gruffalo, Ladybir, etcetera and it’s fascinating to me how certain titles work and others don’t, and the latter aren’t necessarily hackworks but for example some of the 1960s Ladybird versions of fairy tales, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty are charmless, even if the illustrations are good. So even at this stage of my life I can assess some qualities and find both pleasure or interest in them or the opposite. Equally fascinating is the process of reading books one read in ones teens and reassessing them both in light if ones perceptions then and ones feelings now. And in a way that’s what I mean by worth, on the personal level, an important caveat, one should find genuinely worthwhile stuff has some resonance and God knows not just nostalgia for truth to tell J had a bit of a down time in my teens. Indeed the other point is that I’ll bet youll find most of us here have never stopped liking music while having the capacity to like more whatever the area.

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24. Dr. X - December 6, 2010

Well, children’s fiction is interesting. I tried reading that Philip Pullman, and I genuinely tried and genuinely couldn’t get into it.

But some grown-ups are buck mad for Harry Potter.

And as for music, in the past 12 hours I’ve listened to Patsy Cline, the Les Paul Guitar Trio, Vampire Weekend, Van Morrison – and Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto.

I suppose the lesson is that the world don’t move to the beat of just one drum.

What might be right for you might not be right for some.

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WorldbyStorm - December 7, 2010

Hence my caveat above.

But levity aside these are significant questions in a way. What is value, particularly now in a media saturated world.

Go to admit I found books one and two of Pullman hard going and never got past the first chapte or so of three.

As for Potter. Never go into one let alone the sequence.

If you’ve reread books from when you were young, say ten to fourteen have you found them surprisingly flat in descriptive terms?

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sonofstan - December 7, 2010

And as for music, in the past 12 hours I’ve listened to Patsy Cline, the Les Paul Guitar Trio, Vampire Weekend, Van Morrison – and Beethoven’s Emperor Concerto.

Your point being…?

Sorry, but I could pick a dozen random records from the shelves around me, and on the floor and dazzle you with my eclecticism too…..and, man the books I’ve read….

No one – on (apart from you) this thread – is trying to impress anyone, or make huge claims for their taste, actually, which is why I get a buzz out of musical banter around here, because, unlike the insufferable snobbery of actual teenage music junkies, we realise that it doesn’t matter that much what you’ve heard or haven’t heard, and musicians are mostly eejits, and maybe all this stuff isn’t great, but it’s fun to remember.

But then some of it is too. There’s pop records that are as great – and greater – as the greatest of 20th c serious music.

And you’re not the only one here who loves Mahler. It’s just others don’t feel the need to whack it down as their cultural platinum credit card.

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WorldbyStorm - December 7, 2010

That’s a fair point about not trying to impress… Though it troubles me how little response my AC/DC post got a while ago. 😉

But it’s like Yourcousins posts, or whoever, we all trust each others judgement that there’s something fun, or good, or even just worth turning our ears however briefly towards. After all how else in this music saturated world will I read about FSk after decades of not thinking about them, or hear about some new US band that Yourcousins likes that’s completely off our radar, or get the information on this thread alone. It’s great craic.

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25. Chet Carter - December 7, 2010

If you are a fan of rock n roll or good pop music you will instinctively know that U2 and Westlife are crap. Just as if you are a country fan you will know that Patsy Cline is good and Margo … well not as good. It’s a very Eoghan Harris type of logic to throw accusations at people who are fans of music that they are elitists if they consider the music they listen to is superior to the type of music that the plain people of Ireland like. The fact is a lot of people like mediocre music. It doesn’t make them inferior to the music geeks that inhabit this blog, they just have a shit taste in music. Simple. I am partial to bit of Bach when it comes to classical.

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26. Dr. X - December 7, 2010

Seriously guys, no offence was intended on my part, and if any was given I’m happy to apologise.

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sonofstan - December 7, 2010

Sorry, Dr.X, I went off a bit in the last comment. Pre-Budget Tension.

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EamonnCork - December 7, 2010

When you’re runnin’ down my musical taste, boy, you’re walkin’ on the fightin’ side of me.

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27. WorldbyStorm - December 7, 2010

No need to apologise

It’s a bit like football. For those with no interest it’s near incomprehensible, for those with an interest it’s of consuming importance. And it doesn’t matter if someone believes that basketball, or hurling or whatever is better or more elegant or more skillful or just more craic, it’s an argument that just can’t be made as to motivations etc (even in jest).

One other point. There’s no way in the world we’re trying to parade our musical good taste here given some of the things we like (just wait for the Turbonegro post). Surely, it’s often a bit willfully obscure, but… that’s all part of the craic.

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28. Chet Carter - December 7, 2010

True, sometimes it’s fun to parade your musical bad tastes. Me, I have a sneaking fondness for the cheesier side of Glam Rock. Tiger Feet by Mud gets me every time. Which brings things full circle back to Eamonn Carr. Dearg Doom could be labelled the classic Irish Glam Rock single.

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Phil - December 18, 2010

Thus far on this thread the only band I’ve ever heard has been U2 (you know that thing where you buy a single by a band you’ve never heard to see if they’re any good, and either (a) discover a new band or (b) play it twice and never want to hear it, or them, again? “11 O’Clock Tick Tock”, (b). I’ve managed the first part.)

But “Dearg Doom” was a great single. Our Chemistry teacher at the time had red hair and was called Derek, so my friend tried to get the nickname of “Derek Doom” going – never really caught on though. (Come to think of it, a couple of years later that would have been a great joke punk name.)

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WorldbyStorm - December 18, 2010

Horslips were brilliant. No dispute. Derek Doom would have been a great punk name. You know that’s a list I’d love to make 🙂

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29. Tom Crossley - February 4, 2011

Good to hear some good vibes about Bad Karma Beckons in which I had the pleasure of being a founding member. For the record we were not a made up band; we existed – and terrorised london for a good few years attracting the attention of Greg Shaw from BOMP! and Kim Fowley to name but two, so we were the real shit, disbelievers!

Seriously kids, we recorded one (mini)album only, Mutate and Survive but contributed to about 10 compilations. We also had a video of Six Brides for Jerry Lee that recently saw the light again on a dvd comp on Cherry Red. Next came Helltrain who were basically BKB with a different bass player.

Helltrain recorded a self titled LP and anyone who wants one let me know I have a bunch of them. We also recorded a version of The Magic Touch for a Bobby Fuller Four Comp which came out in Canada.
The album in my opinion was cut too fast at the mastering and it didnt do us justice. After that things just tailed off people went their separate ways and the chapter ended.

I was in a couple of bands between then and now, one with Carol called the Reversals who included Gavin Hughes ex The Split Personality’s, Paul Tohil from (Warren Point)and included Andy Odlin (ex American Ruse/Campus Tramps) Jeff Wallace (ex Living in Texas)and occasionally Mick Atkins (ex Wasted Youth)….we never did a proper gig although on my 40th Birthday most of them got together for a surprise party for me.

The Famous Monsters were another venture which included Giovanni Dadomo (Ex Snivellin’ Shits, and famed rock n rock journo) Mick Atkins, Carol Walters and Paul, plus a revolving drumstool with Bill Kite, Andy Scott (ex Wasted Youth) and Deptford Andy along with occasional sax and harp from Mike Harris and Paul Romane. Patti Palladin (Snatch/Thunders etc)contributed vocals too. We gigged and recorded demos but nothing came out officially. Finally The Phobics, my current mob who have been going since 1999. We have an album just out that has a cover of Die Slowly from the helltrain lp and a couple of other things from the reversals days. Karma drummer Charlie is in our line up by co-incidence too. Find me on Facebook if you want more info.

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WorldbyStorm - February 11, 2011

Tom, that’s great stuff. And really helpful to have a clear sense of who was in the band and where they went next. I think I mentioned The Phobics in the OP. Will have to dig into that.

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30. kikdrum - February 11, 2011

Paranoid Visions release their song ‘Politician (How the Other half Lives)’ on Feb 18th 2011 to coincide with the General Elections in Ireland.

From the “Der-Election” 9 track E.P. on FOAD Musick, available from : http://www.paranoidvisions.com/

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/p52Bs0aOoOg?fs=1&hl=en_US&rel=0

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31. Chet Carter - February 11, 2011

Paranoid Visions are still going! Hopefully they can outlast U2.

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WorldbyStorm - February 11, 2011

That would indeed be no small achievement.

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32. This Weekend I’ll not be Listening to…The Greatest Psych-Garage Compilation in the world…ever! « The Cedar Lounge Revolution - October 8, 2011

[…] they perhaps they should have been. And if I were remaking it I’d definitely add Beach Boy by Bad Karma Beckons and Come out and Play by the Mad Violets. […]

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33. gerrymolyneaux - December 19, 2011

have to say some interesting info there but dont agree boomtown rats were 100 pc shite.thought their first 2 releases were brill and had 3 or 4 good punk tracks on first l.p.like simon carmody bobs head got too big and he began spouting his world vision and stardom etiquette.met one or two members of said group and their view of punk was far more realistic and sane.geldof spent too much time mirror gazing.like simon bob grew his hair and outgrew his down to earth sensibility.does anybody remember dynamo,the ska band from galway,around the early ’80’s?

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