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Gigs at the Tivoli Dublin in the 1990s January 31, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Did a little exercise last night listing gigs I saw in the early 1990s at the Tivoli from  1993 (when I think it started hosting gigs there) on.

In no particular order…

Suede

Manic Street Preachers

Breeders

Grant Lee Buffalo

Pop Will Eat Itself

Jeff Buckley

Auteurs

The Fall (I have no memory of this but I was there)

Teenage Fanclub

Henry Rollins (non spoken word gig)

I’ve a memory of That Petrol Emotion, and I know there were one or two more. . This site here actually shows tickets for some of the above gigs. It was a great venue and whoever was doing promotions there had a handle on some really good groups Does anyone know of a list of gigs there during that period?

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1. droq - January 31, 2016
droq - January 31, 2016

They don’t have the Grant Lee Buffalo tho so not

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Or the Fall or Teenage Fanclub or Auteurs. Mind you very handy as a reminder so thanks. Didn’t see any of the other ones listed.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

And GLB were support for Tool or The Breeders iirc.

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2. Dr.Nightdub - January 31, 2016

I’m nearly sure the That Petrol Emotion gig was their last, or part of their farewell tour. I’m fairly sure I saw Carter the Unstoppable Sex Machine there as well. Definitely saw a band called Earthling there as well, a lurker on here has never forgiven me for sending certain substances flying all over Francis St beforehand!

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Hah, that’s gigs for you. Yeah I think it was their last tour.

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3. droq - January 31, 2016

WbS GLB supported the breeders, but they’d played the night before as headliners I think. Since it was around Halloween they came out in witch hats and fake beards calling themselves “Hag” for the breeders gig.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

I remember them at the breeders well, I also recall the previous night, what throws me is the other website which lists Tool the previous night and I’m 100% sure I never saw Tool ever (which is a pity) so I was assuming my memory of the previous night was faulty.

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4. sonofstan - January 31, 2016

I worked there a lot during those years – top memory was Bootsy Collins, who brought in a bass rig that was bigger than the house PA – and blew the main fuse….
I also remember the first time Oasis played in Dublin, early ’93, I think, and me and my mate D** were standing just inside the door waiting for the band to show up for their load in – it was a narrow corridor and, as they arrived the Gallaghers just pushed through us with a snarl and a look.
‘Wankers’ said D*** audibly, and there was a bit of a staring match, before they decided that beating up the stagehands probably wasn’t going to do their legend any good, and sloped off. Nothing they did later ever disabused me of that initial judgment though…..

It was also the first instance I remember of a syndrome that is contributing to the closure of lots of venues in these islands; gigs used to run late, and, after the apartments across the road were built, new residents began complaining, which necessitated loading out through the back, and through a long lane to Thomas St. This meant hiring more crew if you wanted to get out of there before dawn. I still don’t grasp how people who buy into the ‘let’s move into town where it’ll be all cool and happening’ then start complaining at the unavoidable stuff that goes with the coolness and happening-ness. Or don’t even suss that there’s venues and stuff in the neighbourhood before you buy and work out that there might be attendant noise.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Completely agree re the last paragraph. I lived close to there, on Ardee Street and it was very noticeable how as more people piled in the area got less vibrant! There’s also a functional aspect to the newer apartment buildings. I worked for much of the 90s for a group of companies who provided electrical stuff, lighting, fuse boards, etc to the building trade. On occasion I’d go out (on the doss, I mean of course doing on the ground research) with sales reps around the newer apts being built and talking to those building them, fitting them, etc, it was clear the standards were much lower – soundproofing, wall thickness, than pre-existing buildings. So those going in and paying extravagant sums were getting a much worse product (so to speak) than those in buildings, whether corpo or otherwise already in situ (it’s one of the things that enrages me about the Alan Kelly stuff for those very reasons).

Now in East Wall there’s even greater disruption due to the road/rail and river, but it’s kind of a given and the community know it and work around it and it is a fraction further out than there.

Remember that lane vividly. Towards 1994/5 they started letting the crowds out through there didn’t they.

My recollection is that the crowd became a bit younger by 1995 and a bit more hassley and us wiseacres (not even 30!) decided to move on to the more sedate charms of Whelans and the Mean Fiddler. Must do a list for them as well.

BTW, never liked Oasis so this just adds to my preexisting dislike.

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sonofstan - January 31, 2016

Heard a funny story about the opening of the Fiddler the other day. Guy I work with used to work for Vince Power, running one of his London venues and was invited over for the opening of the MF here. Anyway, they got there in the afternoon of the first day of the venue and the place was still a building site – my friend did a few bits and pieces to help and then went off to eat and change. He came back at opening time and the place looked immaculate – he bumped into Vince who asked if he spotted what was missing. He said ‘no the place looksgreat’, Vince persisted,
‘So you didn’t spot anything as you came in?’
‘No….. two really big guys on the door though; you expecting trouble?’
Vince walked him back downstairs….
And pointed….
There was no front door.
The two big guys were picked to disguise the fact….

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Brilliant. That was always a mad venue.

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Michael Carley - January 31, 2016

I started going to Whelans in the early 90s, mostly for visiting blues players. I caught the tail end of the first generation Chicago players. Off hand: Jimmy Rogers (rhythm guitarist in the first Muddy Waters band, which had a fair claim to be the first rock and roll group); Honeyboy Edwards, who had played with Robert Johnson; John Hammond Jr. Roughest, nastiest gig was Wilko Johnson: I have never seen anyone with his stage presence.

That blues scene started fading a bit in the later nineties when people who had learned note-perfect solos from records started laying down the law on authenticity.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

I saw Wilko Johnson in London in 1991, fantastic gig. When you say rough you mean tension from crowd?

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Michael Carley - January 31, 2016

Tension from the stage. For tension from the crowd, I never saw anything to touch Bruxelles.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Heheh, yeah high energy wilko. Bruxelles, sure though I always found metallers calm enough usually

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Michael Carley - January 31, 2016

I wasn’t thinking of the metallers in Bruxelles, but the crowd for the blues-rock house band on a Monday night.

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WorldbyStorm - January 31, 2016

Ahhh, yeah, that makes sense

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Michael Carley - January 31, 2016

I got to know a (very) fine musician who played in blues-rock type outfits round Waterford and he said his problem was that the fanbase were bikers (as opposed to `motorcyclists’) and they had high standards and the skills to enforce them. Bit like the kind of joint the original blues players worked, I suppose.

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sonofstan - February 1, 2016

There used to be – still is maybe? – a big biker scene n Waterford. A bunch of them used to run a gig somewhere out in housing estate past where WIT is now ( I think). We played there once and were treated really well, paid properly and fed and watered. I guess they could splash what they saved on security….

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Michael Carley - February 1, 2016

I know there used to be a big biker scene, mainly centred on Waterford Crystal, I believe, because guys working there were well-paid and skilled at doing things to machines.

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Michael Carley - February 1, 2016

Don’t know how much faith you would place in this:

Bikers ride into Waterford to target crime-gripped city’s gangs

http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/crime/bikers-ride-waterford-target-crime-gripped-5351798

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5. Brian Hanley - February 1, 2016

That was the Freewheelers, who some veterans of the punk scene will tell you met their Waterloo at Lisdoonvarna in 1983….

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Michael Carley - February 1, 2016

Can’t see them being much into Abba somehow …

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