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Firing U.S. … March 18, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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It’s never not a good time to remind ourselves of certain aspects of US labour law that are… well, problematic. Most notably, perhaps, 

Most private employment contracts are at-will, which means that you can fire someone for almost any reason, but there are exceptions: You can’t fire employees for their race, gender, or other attributes covered by antidiscrimination laws, or for complaining about illegal activity. If you talk to your employee about their performance or behavioral issues before you fire them—and keep a record of each meeting—they’ll be less likely to sue you for discrimination or retaliation, and you’ll be in a stronger position if they do.

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1. CL - March 18, 2016

Labour power is a commodity subject to the laws of the market. Social democracy when it existed in Europe attenuated this inherent inhuman law of capitalism. With neoliberalism triumphant workers are increasingly subject to the dictates of the market.

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Tomboktu - March 18, 2016

I know what you’re getting at, but I don’t like the phrase ‘the laws of the market’, because it makes the market should like a system on physics, as if it and its ‘laws’ given to us by nature. I think it would be much better to use language like ‘the design of the market’ because brings out the fact that key features of our economic systen have been chosen, and doors not use the capitalists’ TINA messaging.

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CL - March 18, 2016

I agree with the essence of what you are saying. The physics envy of economics is well known. But there are many ‘laws’ not of nature. Law itself is an artifice.But you’re right, saying ‘laws of the market’ does tend to naturalize what is a human process, and power driven struggle, and serves to sanitize ideologically the commodification of human beings.

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CL - March 19, 2016

But capitalism as a mode of production does have a certain inherent characteristic logic such as the drive to accumulate and commodify everything including humans, and the inevitability of periodic crises. But it might be better not to use the word ‘law’ to describe these inexorable tendencies of capital, if by so doing we ascribe a permanence and inevitability to what can and must be changed.

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2. gendjinn - March 19, 2016

Every couple of years I’ll raise the topic of a union benefiting STEM works with a group of co-workers (I’m in the software field). Responses range from the occasional outright hostility to polite but active disinterest.

Though with millennials being transparent with their peers on compensation is changing the established power dynamic. The number of bitter complaints I heard from HR and management about that behaviour. Really frustrates their attempts to “keep costs low”.

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WorldbyStorm - March 19, 2016

Urghhhh…terrible dynamic you are experiencing there.

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gendjinn - March 19, 2016

I know I harp on about the millennials a lot, but I see promising green shoots with their rejection of the boomer society that GenXers didn’t have enough bodies to overturn.

Sam Cooke is right a change is gonna come.

Even if we have to put up with the ghastly bucket of tepid spit & shit a Clinton presidency will be.

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yourcousin - March 19, 2016

I always preferred this version in which change has got come. Far more pessimistic, which suits my general frame of reference.

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WorldbyStorm - March 19, 2016

Yes, is good

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WorldbyStorm - March 19, 2016

And by the way that’s kind of my frame of reference too

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yourcousin - March 19, 2016

Are you sure you’re not a papist? Because as my grandmother used to say, “it can always be worse”, which is basically Catholicism in a nutshell.

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WorldbyStorm - March 20, 2016

Weeeellll… 🙂. Culturally who knows? I was brought up by a mix of atheists, Catholics and Church of Ireland (four generations in the one house at one stage) so…

By the way was she?

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yourcousin - March 20, 2016

You might as well ask if the Pope is Catholic. The last of the church going Catholics in our family. Not even any Creasters left. She just turned 94 at the end of February. But as liberal as all get out on things like married priests, birth control, homosexuality etc.

I remember you’re from a mixed house, similar to mine accept we were a Baptist/Catholic divide.

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WorldbyStorm - March 20, 2016

Yeah my mother converted to RC when marrying. My father converted to atheism!

That’s really interesting re your gran. Sounds like a character, I’ve found the older people can be a lot more liberal

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gendjinn - March 20, 2016

It is indeed. Although I must confess to attempts to convert my cynicism into skepticism, for the wee one like.

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yourcousin - March 20, 2016

Children add a whole other dimension to things. I find it impossible to be callous to things like I used to be but at the same have become more fatalistic as I feel hemmed in since I am the primary provider financially.

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gendjinn - March 20, 2016

Do they ever? I know that my worldview unalterably changed the day she was born. Talking to other fathers I find similar experiences.

I know I swallowed shit at work I wouldn’t have before she was born.

But the brain hack referred to above worked and I believe it’s all worth it😉

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CL - March 19, 2016

“When Barack Obama told America late Tuesday night that “a change has come,” the many promises cashed in by those four words included a very specific promise made in 1964 by Sam Cooke.”
http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/sam-cooke-change-gonna-theme-song-barack-obama-presidency-article-1.337826

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