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Age disparities April 7, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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One of the most unpleasant aspects of the crises of recent years has been the complaints about disparities in treatment between different age groups of workers. So we’ve seen workers in the public sector on different rates depending on entrance, with younger workers on worse pay rates than older ones. The unions should take much of the blame for it, but I think it important too to keep in mind who pushed these policies forward – and contextualise that with the crocodile tears shed by some in the political world and commentariat subsequently.

The UK is no different either. And it’s not just public sector pay rates. For example, the Observer notes in relation to the living wage that while increases are welcome:

…spare a thought for those who will not see their pay packets grow this month. Only over-25s get the new national living wage. So for younger workers Osborne’s new wage merely widens the pay gap between young and old. And while it’s fashionable to demonise big business, the new pay sinners are more likely to be middle-class employers of dogwalkers, babysitters and gardeners. Millions of workers paid cash-in-hand in Britain’s shadow economy also risk missing out.

Switching back to this state we’ve seen not dissimilar treatments in terms of welfare provision (from those who claimed that welfare was ‘protected’ or that cuts hadn’t been made or had been reinstated). It’s no great stretch to see how these divisive policies can impact on worker solidarity.

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