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Signs of Hope – A continuing series – 14th of July July 14, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Gewerkschaftler suggested this recently:

I suggest this blog should have a regular (weekly) slot where people can post happenings at the personal or political level that gives them hope that we’re perhaps not going to hell in a handbasket as quickly as we thought. Or as the phlegmatic Germans put it “hope dies last”.

Any contributions this week?

Comments»

1. Deadon@hell.com - July 14, 2016

the existence of Jeremy Corbyn

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2. sonofstan - July 14, 2016

I get somewhat childishly excited by population stats. I find the fact the population of the state is heading steadily towards 5 million quite cheering, and the Island heading towards 7m. I’ve no real idea why this makes me happy, but it does.

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Liberius - July 14, 2016

I share that excitement, for me though the great excitement is seeing Dublin increasing it’s share of the population. 1.345 Million, beautiful.

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Liberius - July 14, 2016

*its…

By the by, a rough calculation indicates to me that the 158 seat Dáil has just become unconstitutional. 4,757,976 / 158 = 30,113.7722; so minimum increase next time of one seat, let’s hope though that they are less stupid and account for future increases.

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Gewerkschaftler - July 14, 2016

Me too – as a sign of hope – especially as the population is younger than the average in Europe.

But I’d rather not see the mistakes of centralisation repeated again and the population spread across the island, in regional centres at least.

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ar scáth a chéile - July 14, 2016

Another million or two and we’ll be back to1845 levels.

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gendjinn - July 14, 2016

That’d be one of the reasons I reckon many other Irish would find similar joy.

Don’t know about you but to my parents the famine was just yesterday, their parents heard stories from famine survivors and relayed them in full horror to their children. I’ve always felt that those born in the 60s/70s onwards were the first generation of Irish born without the feeling that famine had just happened.

As it seems that somewhere between the beginning of Gen X and the end of Gen Y, WW2 ceased to be recent and became history.

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ar scáth a chéile - July 14, 2016

Now that I can look back nearly fifty years to a childhood which seems like yesterday but from which I am far more removed in time than I was then from WWII I find a lot of what I once viewed as distant history seems much closer – including the Famine / an Gorta Mór/ an Drochshaol

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3. sonofstan - July 17, 2016

Birmingham, yesterday.

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4. Joe - July 18, 2016

Couldn’t find What you want to say so posting this here.
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-36791688

Funny, and kinda sad.

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Michael Carley - July 18, 2016

However the tribunal said they had not shown that the two factions actually have any substantive political differences.

It added that name-calling or trolling on social media is not sufficient to show political difference nor is “alleged adherence to Trotsky’s 1938 Transitional Program”.

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Tomboktu - July 18, 2016

I looked at the actual decision by the Tribunal, and was both amused and annoyed. Whoever wrote it used it as an opportunity to make fun of the politics of the two men.

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Joe - July 18, 2016

Yep. It appears it was used it as an opportunity to make fun of the politics of the two men and of their adversaries in the union. Knowing the way these things work, the writer is probably an ex-union bureaucrat, Labour Party type.
The decision should not have been used to make fun of the politics of these people but, in fairness, they gave him the material – they set it up, he knocked it down.

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5. Michael Carley - July 18, 2016

I was at Tolpuddle over the weekend, and that always shows signs of hope. There was a big turn-out, especially of Labour branches, which might have been their way of having a meeting at the moment.

Corbyn said all the right things when he spoke, and was introduced as `the duly elected leader of our party’, though he didn’t do any open electioneering. Two anti-Corbyn MPs who were scheduled to speak didn’t turn up. Crowd very supportive of Corbyn, but in a borderline cult of personality way.

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