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What you want to say – 12th October 2016 October 12, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. Jim Monaghan - October 12, 2016

Galway NUIG on 11-12 Nov on Ireland and the Wobblies. Programme will be out soon.

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2. Joe - October 12, 2016

This coming weekend in the Gresham. ‘Dangerous Ideas’, an SP discussion weekend. As me mother would have said, ‘the Gresham, no less’ :).

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CMK - October 12, 2016

Only the best for the working class, Joe!

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sonofstan - October 12, 2016

Any of youse ever seen the metro in Moscow/ St. Petersburg? ‘Palaces for the People’ said the (other) Joe

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Joe - October 12, 2016

Have you been in the Gresham recently CMK? Only joking. It was, not sure if it still is, a good union hotel. The programme of talks looks good. A debate along the lines of ‘Why should socialists bother with the bullshit of a capitalist budget?’ between Paul Murphy of SP and Mr Cullinane of SF.
Hope it goes well.

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Tomboktu - October 12, 2016

It does have the advantage of being a union house

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3. Roger Cole - October 12, 2016

See: http://www.pana.ie for public meeting in the Ireland Institute on
Irish Neutrality

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EWI - October 12, 2016

The Irish Government to issue a 1916 Centenary Medal to both the PDF and the FCÁ:

From the tender:

“An Bonn Comórtha Céad Bliain 1916
The 1916 Centenary Medal

This medal is hereby awarded to you, a serving member of Óglaigh na hÉireann, in this special centenary year of 2016. An Bonn Comórtha Céad Bliain is a special token of our appreciation for the selfless service of the volunteer soldiers, sailors and aircrew of Óglaigh na hÉireann, who have served Ireland and the Irish people since the foundation of the State. In awarding you this medal, we commemorate the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising and we recognise the central role played by Óglaigh na hÉireann in the past and in this centenary year.

The Government of Ireland
December, 2016.”

https://irl.eu-supply.com/app/rfq/publicpurchase.asp?PID=101501

Many, many questionable assertions and curious revising of history in that text. I would have assumed that FF would at least pick up on an unalloyed Treatyite reinterpretation of 1916-23, but apparently not. The real fun will be when FG try to issue their ‘Treaty’ medal.

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4. Michael Carley - October 12, 2016

Migrant workers and their supporters are planning a day of action to highlight their role in the UK in what is being billed as a celebration of the contribution they make to British society.

Plans for the event, called One Day Without Us, include a labour boycott to show how important migrants are to the UK workforce.

Organiser Matt Carr, a writer and commentator, has urged migrants and their supporters to join in the day of action on 20 February 2017. He said the trigger for the event was profound concern about worsening attitudes to migrants in the UK.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/oct/10/migrant-workers-plan-labour-boycott-to-protest-racism-highlight-contribution-to-britain

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5. Florrie O'Donoghue - October 12, 2016

Apologies if this has been posted in a previous WYWTS, but the father send me this last week:

Shannonwatch are shocked and dismayed by another cancellation of their room booking for a seminar scheduled for Oct 8th. A number of international speakers are due to attend the seminar on US Imperialism & Militarization 15 Years after the Afghanistan Invasion, but as a result of room booking cancellations by three hotels in the Shannon and Bunratty area, new arrangements must now be made.

The Park Inn and the Oakwood Arms Hotel in Shannon, as well as the Bunratty Castle Hotel all initially accepted bookings for the seminar. Each then cancelled, claiming a mistake had been made. The most recent cancellation by the Bunratty Castle Hotel has come just 3 days before the event.

http://www.shannonwatch.org/

Is mise, srl.,

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Joe - October 12, 2016

Presumably all those hotels make a few bob as a result of the US military’s use of Shannon.

But Shannonwatch should not be too upset. They are not alone. I’m sure the hotels don’t take bookings for Traveller weddings either.

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Florrie O'Donoghue - October 12, 2016

The Oakwood has, in the past, hosted meetings on this theme.

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Hasley'sDidact - October 14, 2016

why don’t you run a hotel and host a few traveller weddings? noob

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CL - October 15, 2016

“A large tent was procured and set up on the grounds immediately outside the entrance of the airport, just off airport property, where everyone entering or leaving the airport could plainly see the large sign posted: ‘Peace not War: U.S. out of Shannon Airport’.”
http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/10/14/ireland-resisting-the-empire/

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dublinstreams - October 15, 2016

they dropped one of the speakers, and disowned their views, I said before that I wouldn’t rate anyone that writes for globalresearch dot ca https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10154478871141501&id=268685181500

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CL - October 15, 2016

‘my meme was intended to raise questions about a possible psychological and Zionist geo-strategic operation behind the current wave of migrants, said to be from Syria….
I posted another meme in which I said that Victor Orban of Hungary was correct in erecting a fence on the Hungarian border with Serbia. Why? Because Orban, who is close to Moscow and Beijing, has had enough of US, EU, Zionist criminality…
Orban is and has been for a long time, a target of CIA/Mossad regime change operations….
banks linked to the Rothshilds such as Barclays are making a fortune from the misery of these people…
Arabs are being driven from their lands, shipped on US funded boats to Europe in order to make room for Jewish Lebensraum…Gearoid O Colmain.
https://thewallwillfall.org/2015/09/20/we-are-at-war-we-are-outnumbered-respect-is-key-to-our-success-gearoid-o-colmain/

‘I was told I could not speak as they had heard from their ‘affiliated ‘ organisations that I was “anti-semitic” and “homophobic”…

‘The Irish Anti-War movement are a group of Trotskyite buffoons ..
I did not believe a Marxist-Leninist would be welcome at an event attended by Trotskyites.
I fully stand over everything I have written about the central role of the Jewish Lobby on US foreign policy and the reactionary politics of the LGBT’- O Colmain.
http://ahtribune.com/world/europe/1264-irish-human-rights.html

Anyone know anything about this O Colmain chap?

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6. sonofstan - October 12, 2016

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/oct/11/simulated-world-elon-musk-the-matrix

A bit of me is tempted to point out that philosophers as Pyrrho have been thinking this through since a few hundred years BC, but the science is good fun. It explains Trump and Brexit is some weird way – someone up there is bored….

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gendjinn - October 12, 2016

It is an optimistic solution to Fermi’s paradox. On the downside you don’t know what the runtime or termination criteria of the simulation are. So let’s keep it entertaining!

But it also makes sense. Unless you are the first type 1 civilization the chances are you are more likely to be within a simulation than base reality.

And to anyone who has waded through Stephen R Donaldson will know, the correct response to that is “And?”

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EWI - October 12, 2016

I would have thought that the correct response of someone who has waded through SRRD’s best-known work would be; ‘forty years and that’s how you ended it? Really?’.

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gendjinn - October 13, 2016

You made it to the end? Good on ye! I haven’t had the fortitude go further than the 1st book of the final cycle.

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EWI - October 13, 2016

The man can write very well, but needs a good editor. There was plot for two, maybe three books at maximum in his (final) series to wrap it up, a quadrilogy.

The ultimate showdown, resolution and aftermath occurred in a few sparse pages, explaining little and really not at all satisfactory after so long.

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gendjinn - October 13, 2016

Yeah, I got that feeling on the slog through the 2nd one.

After the Gap series, I wasn’t up for another. Too many fantastic authors out there these days.

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7. Gewerkschaftler - October 12, 2016

The New Silk Road.

… is very much one of the major priorities of the current Chinese government and cargo trains are now going from the Chinese manufacturing centres on its east coast to places like Madrid, twice as fast as equivalent shipping through the Suez Canal.

The Chinese have wisely mapped out at least two land routes – north and south of the Caspian and Black Seas. The northern one is in cooperation with Kazakhstan and Russia going on to western Europe, and the other ‘middle corridor’ through Pakistan, Iran and Turkey and on into western Europe.

Similar long distance oil and gas pipelines are being built. Eurasia is becoming more integrated.

Chinese train arriving in Madrid after a 13,000 km. journey.

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Gewerkschaftler - October 12, 2016

Whoops – formatting snafu.

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Gewerkschaftler - October 12, 2016
8. Michael Carley - October 13, 2016

Dario Fo has died. I couldn’t find the Robbie Coltrane television version of Mistero Buffo, but this one is relevant far beyond Italy:

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9. Joe - October 13, 2016

Can’t link to it but Newton Emerson in today’s IT says ‘chill, everyone’ about the border and Brexit.

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EWI - October 13, 2016

Well, wouldn’t he? Newt’s columns always come across to me as self-therapy, a comfort blanket for someone protesting too much that the Union is eternal 😎

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10. RosencrantzisDead - October 13, 2016

Bob Dylan has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

A sign of hope or…? I shall leave it to the music aficionados here to debate this.

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Liberius - October 13, 2016

Hilarious, though no more so than almost every peace prize winner, or indeed the continued existence of the Riksbank’s ‘memorial’ award for economics.

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WorldbyStorm - October 13, 2016

+1

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11. sonofstan - October 13, 2016

Dylan deserves it, but should probably share it with Chuck Berry from whom he stole a fair bit – and freely admits it.

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Joe - October 13, 2016

I know more of Dylan’s output than I do of Heaney’s, Beckett’s and all of the other winners of this prize. Is it literature? Who cares.

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Aonrud ⚘ - October 13, 2016

If we start down that route, there’s the whole minefield of his use of traditional and folk songs, which seems to exercise some. Likewise, from what I’ve seen he’s always been quite happy to acknowledge that as well.

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Joe - October 13, 2016

Yep. Isn’t it that he steeped himself in folk and American roots and blues etc as a boy and a young man – listening to the radio – and a lot of his songs came out of that/were lifted from that. And as you say he acknowledges that.

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Aonrud ⚘ - October 13, 2016

I think so, though I believe there’s a more direct route in some cases. He learned a lot of tunes from the British and Irish folk scene as well. I’m certainly no expert, but my understanding is that some objected to his use in that folk singers would often have a more identifiable version of a trad./folk song and attribute it as such on recordings, whereas Dylan often took them as a seed for a very different song, that was then attributed to him.

It all seems a bit precious really. And as far as I’m aware, he’d often say “I got that from a Scottish song” or whatever, when asked. Any bigger fans around who know more?

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sonofstan - October 13, 2016

The man who probably deserves a posthumous share in the prize is Harry Smith, the compiler of the Anthology of American Folk Music and a thoroughly remarkable man without whom etc. But again, Dylan always acknowledged the debt.

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12. Dr. X - October 13, 2016

There is fury over the fact that Zim beat Kenyan favourite Ngugi Wa Thiong’o for the prize. . . even though I’ve been a Dylan fan my whole life, I can’t help feeling that this decision is more than a bit peculiar.

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13. roddy - October 13, 2016

That count Eoghan Harris once said that he measured his life in “Dylan albums”.What a poser!

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sonofstan - October 13, 2016

I wish I had the photoshop skills to replace Dylan with Harris on some of those sleeves – The Freewheelin’ Eoghan Harris’ , ‘(Yet) Another Side of Eoghan Harris’, ‘1921 Revisited’ …. OK, I’ll stop now….

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Michael Carley - October 13, 2016

Highway 16 Revised.

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WorldbyStorm - October 13, 2016

Maybe he meant Dylan from the Magic Roundabout.

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14. sonofstan - October 13, 2016

http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/niall-o-dowd-the-irish-can-be-proud-of-their-history-on-racism-and-slavery-in-the-us-1.2828771

Anyone here read ‘How the Irish Became White?’ By Noel Ignatiev? O’Dowd needs to.

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15. gendjinn - October 13, 2016

Netflix released The Siege of Jadotville and The 13th Amendment. Both outstanding. Although, the latter more than the former.

I know of the events of 1961 Congo but not the details, how accurate the reconstruction of the battle is I do not know and would welcome anyone with more information to share it. The film covers the cold war maneuverings and perfidy surrounding the events of the Congo and the assassination of the UN Secretary General. The movie is great just as an action flick, but it is a lot more than that, or perhaps it’s Irish lads outgunned, outnumbered, cut off, fighting valiantly against toughened mercenaries.

The 13th Amendment is an absolute must see. It pulls together all of the threads of racism and slavery in the USA from the Civil War to BLM today. It’s one of the finest documentaries on any subject I’ve seen in years, incredibly powerful and effective. Anyone wanting to get a good picture of the problems in the US should watch this documentary.

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Alibaba - October 13, 2016

By coincidence a neighbour of mine told me this week about the film The Siege of Jadotville. It so happened that an elderly relative of his who resides in England had returned to Ireland recently to a ceremony in remembrance of what he did in the Congo fight. It seems that the ‘Irish lads’ were damned in the past because of the poor outcome of their role. Good to know it’s being explored now.

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gendjinn - October 13, 2016

Well to avoid spoilers, there was a ceremony in 2005 where things were apparently put right.

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EWI - October 16, 2016

but not the details, how accurate the reconstruction of the battle is I do not know and would welcome anyone with more information to share it.

While obviously not even born in 1961, I am however old enough to be familiar with the Irish Army when it was still using weapons and equipment from the era (not to mention the ahem ‘customs and traditions’). It’s a typical Oirish production which is crewed etc. from the UK, with clearly no ex-Irish service advisors on set.

Apart from all that, the Cruiser certainly played a malignant role, and I heard Denis Halliday tell a Dublin audience some years ago that the sure UN belief was that Dag Hammarskjold was assassinated by the western powers for interfering. The scene of one Irish officer striking a (far) superior one is pure fantasy, there’d have been a court-martial.

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CL - October 16, 2016

‘ liberals and socialists, like myself, saw Conor Cruise O’Brien as a heroic, anti-colonial fighter…
O’Brien is the only figure in the film to have his shoes shined by a black person…
in many ways O’Brien faced the same secessionist dilemma as Abraham Lincoln. And used the same military means in an attempt to end it.
http://www.independent.ie/opinion/columnists/eoghan-harris/the-cruiser-a-hero-of-the-anticolonial-struggle-35096263.html

“I criticised the screenwriter of The Siege at Jadotville for caricaturing Conor Cruise O’Brien and failing to portray him in the film as an Irish anti-colonial hero..

“Conor Cruise O’Brien was one of the leading voices of Ireland’s sophisticated, effective and balanced anti-colonial policy at the United Nations in the late 1950s and early 1960s, a diplomatic strategy that promoted decolonisation in a measured, responsible manner, while also protecting Ireland’s national interests overall.” (Joe Skelly)

That’ll do me.”-Eoghan Harris
http://www.independent.ie/opinion/columnists/eoghan-harris/cheaptricks-budget-will-force-coping-class-to-create-own-party-35133862.html

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EWI - October 16, 2016

Like I suspect many other here on CLR, I’m not to upset at Harris’s wailing and gnashing!

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Michael Carley - October 16, 2016
CL - October 16, 2016

“It is in this regard that Patrice Lumumba’s determination to achieve genuine independence and to have full control over Congo’s resources in order to utilise them to improve the living conditions of our people was perceived as a threat to western interests. To fight him, the US and Belgium used all the tools and resources at their disposal, including the United Nations secretariat, under Dag Hammarskjöld and Ralph Bunche, to buy the support of Lumumba’s Congolese rivals , and hired killers.”
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2011/jan/17/patrice-lumumba-50th-anniversary-assassination

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CL - October 16, 2016

“The UN was the most important vehicle of destroying the Congolese government and laying the groundworks for the dictatorship of Mobutu which wrecked the country.”-
Ludo De Witte.
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2001/12/20/the-tragedy-of-lumumba-an-exchange/

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ar scáth a chéile - October 16, 2016

Another documentary Ive got to see is Home Land ( Iraq Year Zero) a documentary about before and after the 2003 invasion by an Iraqi. Its over 5 hours long – not likely to be shown by our public broadcaster – maybe on BBC 4 or TG4 – or hopefully the Light House or IFC

trailer here

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16. Daniel Rayner O'Connor Lysaght - October 13, 2016

Friends, I would like your assistance. My nephew is preparing a dissertation on modern populism, left and right, an huge subject, though he intends sensibly to concentrate on chosen examples. I am able to give him an overview of general trends since ’91, but he needs source material.
Perhaps someone could give me some titles of books to which I could refer him? There doesn’t seem to be anything outstanding despite the scope of the subject.

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WorldbyStorm - October 13, 2016

Great question. This might be a start from today’s Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/13/birth-of-populism-donald-trump

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Starkadder - October 14, 2016

Some recent titles on the subject from Worldcat:

* Radical right-wing populist parties in Western Europe : into the mainstream? -Akkerman, Lange & Rooduijn
Routledge, 2016.

* Transformations of populism in Europe and the Americas : history and recent tendencies -Abromeit
Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2016

*Populism, media and education : challenging discrimination in contemporary digital societies – Ranieri;
NY : Routledge, 2016.

* The Politics of Fear : what right-wing populist discourses mean
-Wodak, Sage, 2015.

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gendjinn - October 13, 2016

Populism: What elites call democracy when they don’t like the outcome.

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Ed - October 14, 2016

This was an interesting essay on the uses of the term populism, and the footnotes probably have some useful references:

https://newleftreview.org/II/82/marco-d-eramo-populism-and-the-new-oligarchy

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CL - October 15, 2016

‘Sinn Féin’s entire political project, including our opposition to austerity, is populist, and unashamedly so.’
https://eoinobroin.wordpress.com/2013/01/02/in-defence-of-populism/

And to put Trump in perspective Hofstadter is still useful.
http://harpers.org/archive/1964/11/the-paranoid-style-in-american-politics/

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CL - October 15, 2016

Two reviews:

https://www.thenation.com/article/the-two-populisms/

” the populists won the Republican nomination and lost the Democratic one”

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17. sonofstan - October 14, 2016

Hostile comment in Salon, but funny, and possibly a grain of truth?

“You demmies abandoned the new deal and are just republicans with gay friends”

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Michael Carley - October 14, 2016

Ouch: a very concise summary of the abandoning of even mild class politics, and the substituting of identity politics for critique of existing relations.

Even harsher when you think they don’t say `just republicans with gay and black friends’.

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18. gendjinn - October 14, 2016

Deutsche Bank Invested $70million in Trump’s soon-to-be-failure hotel in DC.

What kind of idiot invests *any* money with Trump given his track record of bankruptcies?

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19. ewolc - October 14, 2016

Wednesday 19th – next ATTAC Ireland meeting here’s the facebook link https://www.facebook.com/events/168709493583832/

and if you want to know more about us here’s a podcast:
http://www.attac.ie/podcast-marie-moran-discusses-attac-irelands-campaigns-and-meetings/

Liked by 1 person

20. CL - October 16, 2016

‘Violence and threats of violence emanating from the Trump campaign are multiplying by the day….
As his numbers in the polls have begun to sink, and with the prospect of defeat staring him in the face, Donald Trump has been whipping his supporters into a frenzy with incessant claims that the “system is rigged.”…
Trump is playing with combustible materials. And just as obviously, as he lurches toward what could be an epic electoral collapse, he is not going to stop…egged on by his alt-Right aides… he is almost certain to intensify his incendiary rhetoric….
As the Trump campaign plummets into the gutter, we should not be surprised if people get hurt and blood is shed.”-
Gabriel Schoenfeld, former senior adviser to the Romney campaign in 2012.
http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/trump-campaign-flails-violence-worse-article-1.2832866

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dublinstreams - October 16, 2016

can it really be worse then a black Muslim winning the presidency? it cause more trouble with voting for (down the ballot)

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21. CL - October 16, 2016

“When I go into the Map Room of Palmerston I cannot help remembering that this country over the last two centuries has directed the invasion or conquest of 178 countries.”-Boris Johnson

…the real tragedy underlying the Little Englander mentality. They dream of the power that subjugated the peoples of 178 countries but they also accept that it can now only ever be a dream. Simultaneously they accept the diminishment of their country’s world role. It is a price worth paying if it preserves the values they believe to be uniquely English—the values that enabled and underpinned the glory of empire…
this meets a classic definition of madness”
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/10/15/the-rise-of-hateful-little-england.html

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22. Michael Carley - October 17, 2016

Might be of interest, if only to see ourselves as others see us (and he keeps calling the country the Irish Republic).

If the UK leaves the EU, what happens on the island of Ireland? Its people would be living on either side of an EU border. In this edition of Analysis, Edward Stourton explores an aspect of the Brexit debate that few elsewhere in the UK may have thought about, but which raises urgent questions. Would there be a new opportunities, with a new version of the old Anglo-Irish special relationship? Or could a divisive border and economic harm revive dangerous tensions?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06zqq9l

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23. Alibaba - October 18, 2016

“The battle of Mosul is the most symbolic and important military struggle in the war against the jihadi militants, and the riskiest fight yet.”

Too bloody right!

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/middle-east/isis-expected-to-lose-mosul-battle-but-the-war-still-up-for-grabs-1.2833201

Any suggested readings for a good Left take on what’s going on there and prospects for the future?

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CL - October 18, 2016

‘At least 12 US generals and 5,000 US troops are reportedly in Iraq and they will play a crucial role in the coming struggle…
The loss of the city would… be evidence that the caliphate has no miraculous formula for victory and has gone into irreversible decline…
One way or another it looks likely that Isis will lose, but it is less certain who will win and fill the vacuum left by the overthrow of the caliphate.”-Patrick Cockburn.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/isis-mosul-conflict-attack-latest-offensive-retake-us-coalition-turkey-shia-sunni-a7366416.html

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Gewerkschaftler - October 18, 2016

Erm – Left take – ban all arms exports to the area immediately?

And that includes Saudi Arabia who the US has given 13$Billion in arms to the Saudi Wahabi dictatorship recently to devastate Yemen. Of course that conflict is far less reported than the devastation in Syria, for reasons I’m sure all readers of the blog can work out for themselves.

Kurds are being put in the front line and I’m fairly sure that plans to screw the Kurds once Daesh is defeated (which seems likely) are already being agreed between Turkey, Iraq and the US and other actors.

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24. Alibaba - October 18, 2016

Do you ever wonder: did the judge die of laughing at the accusation of ‘false imprisonment’ of the then tanáiste Joan Burton by a then 17-year-old person in 2014 following a water charges protest? I do, but only when I fantasise.  False imprisonment, eh? Was Burton shackled in? Tosh. I indulge myself further by thinking that should there be any criminal conviction verdicts that could be social dynamite.
 
I see there is a Rally for Justice on Sat Oct 22nd at 1pm proceeding, appropriately, from Central Bank Plaza to the Children’s Court. Organised in defence of protest. Bring it on.

Liked by 1 person

25. Tomboktu - October 18, 2016

As it happens, I had reason to look at the evaluation of JobBridge undertaken by Indecon in 2013. Heartening to see that a whopping 84.4% of the organisations hiring interns did so “because the scheme contributed to national policy by providing internship opportunities to unemployed”. Who knew our employers in the private, public and community sectors were so civic minded? I think there is an untapped potential there for innovation in national policy in other areas, such as corporate tax, a living wage, paid paternity leave, packaging waste reduction, among others.

Liked by 1 person

dublinstreams - October 18, 2016

the news and statements referred today to Indecon report is it the 2013 report or a newer one can’t find it a newer one. http://www.welfare.ie/en/pressoffice/Pages/pr181016.aspx

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Tomboktu - October 19, 2016

I can’t find a newer one. (A PQ would clarify that!)

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Tomboktu - October 19, 2016

Who knew our employers in the private, public and community sectors were so civic minded?

I typed too soon. ISME has responded this morning to the change in the government’s policy on helping people out of unemployment by saying it won’t accept the requirement to pay the minimum wage.

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