jump to navigation

Signs of Hope – A continuing series November 10, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
trackback

This weeks positive stories for the left? Anything? Anything? Anything at all?

Comments»

1. EWI - November 10, 2016

Hillary wasn’t elected. The flip side if that, though…

Like

2. Roger Cole - November 10, 2016

EWI makes a good point. Clinton was in favour of imposing a no fly zone over Syria when the US Chief of Staff said that would mean war with Russia leading to the death of everybody on the planet. At least that gives time for a major revitalistisation of a progressive movement in the US that will regain the support of people in the US “rust belt” states that voted for Trump rather than Clinton, the declared candidate of Wall Street and the 1%.

Like

Sean Dempsey - November 10, 2016

‘After Hitler, our turn next!’
The victory of open reaction and this is your response you clown 😂
First as tragedy, then as farce

Liked by 1 person

WorldbyStorm - November 10, 2016

Roger, we are talking about the same Donald Trump aren’t we, you know the one, this guy here…

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/03/trump-asks-why-us-cant-use-nukes-msnbcs-joe-scarborough-reports.html

Like

WorldbyStorm - November 10, 2016

And speaking of that Donald Trump and the 1%,

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/nov/10/loyalists-and-rivals-tipped-for-powerful-roles-in-trump-cabinet

“Trump is also likely to look to the business world. Steven Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs banker who oversaw Trump’s finance efforts, is well positioned to be treasury secretary. Other potential cabinet figures from the business world include fracking mogul Harold Hamm.”

Hmmmmm.

Like

Gewerkschaftler - November 10, 2016

Yes – Wall St. seems happy with the election. And why wouldn’t they be.

Only the marks for this con-man (for that is what he is, above all) believed it would be otherwise.

Like

Gewerkschaftler - November 10, 2016

Sorry – not appropriate here – will post something positive later.

Like

CL - November 10, 2016

Reaction is the appropriate word to use. This is the Great Reaction,-a reaction to the historical progressive movement stemming from the Enlightenment. That the Enlightenment heritage has its own contradictions should not blind us to the dangerous atavistic energies now being released. Trump’s victory bolsters the extreme Right everywhere.

Like

CL - November 11, 2016

“The Whigs chose power over principles when they nominated Zachary Taylor in 1848. The party never recovered….
Many have called Donald Trump’s unexpected takeover of a major political party unprecedented; but it’s not. A similar scenario unfolded in 1848, when General Zachary Taylor, a roughhewn career soldier who had never even voted in a presidential election, conquered the Whig Party.”
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/history-campaign-politics-zachary-taylor-killed-whigs-political-party-213935

Like

3. Dr. X - November 10, 2016

I think it’s hopeful that the United States is fully and finally exposed as a grotesquely dysfunctional society, that could never, and should never, have been a model for anywhere else in the world.

Like

yourcousin - November 10, 2016

Yeah I never was a fan of a bicameral legislator either.

Like

4. CL - November 10, 2016

In 1848 Zachary Taylor the Whig candidate won the presidency. The Whigs never recovered from his victory.

Like

5. Gewerkschaftler - November 10, 2016

The negotiations in Berlin for a new SPD(tending somewhat leftwards of the national SPD)/ die Linke /Green regional government are going constructively and amicably.

Lots of interesting programme items on public ownership, transparency and control, housing, education, ‘netzpolitik’ (the politics of the internet), environment and transport etc. have been agreed. I’ll write them up in more detail when and if the programme for government is agreed (late November/early December by the current timetable).

Everyone remembers the experience of the previous an SPD/Left government where the SPD walked all over the as yet inexperienced Left to the latter’s lasting damage. This time three parties seem minded to treat each other as partners. The threat of the AfD has focused minds on providing a workable alternative to them and their fellow-travellers in other parties.

As a migrant Irish Auslander I’m disenfranchised both in Ireland and in Germany in all but local and EU elections. But at least as a member of a Berlin party I get to vote (one member one vote) on whether the agreed programme for government is enough to justify going into coalition.

Like

Gewerkschaftler - November 11, 2016

Wow – I’ve just read the transport agreements. A full-on pro walkers / cyclists / wheelchair users / public transport as against car-based strategy.

All further investment in big road building (A10) will be stopped.

As a cyclist and public transport user it gladens my heart. If there’s further investment in public transport capacity there’s no reason for anyone, apart from as a status symbol or fetish object, to use a car for commuting or travelling for pleasure. The ability to travel for pleasure and social engagement is an important socialist value, IMO.

The CDU in Berlin will be livid. And I’m surprised the SPD let this through, to be honest.

Like

Gewerkschaftler - November 11, 2016

I guess not so strange re the SPD – die Linke and the Greens have 60% of the seats in the possible forthcoming coalition. And it’s proof that the SPD is not being allowed to dominate the programme.

One thing I was particularly glad to see in other parts of the agreement was the banning of Brown Coal for heating plants in Berlin (yes – it’s still used in some heating plants and yes, die Linke have a far from perfect record in this respect due to the location in – much of it is mined in open-cast mines in East Germany – and unionisation of Brown Coal mining) and the complete phasing out of coal by 2020.

These are not just ‘green’ issues – they are quality of life issues that will benefit the working class.

Like

makedoanmend - November 12, 2016

“As a migrant Irish Auslander I’m disenfranchised both in Ireland and in Germany in all but local and EU elections. But at least as a member of a Berlin party I get to vote (one member one vote) on whether the agreed programme for government is enough to justify going into coalition.”

Good on yee.

Interesting. At this juncture in the political process, you might in an indirect way as an Auslander ‘wield’ more ‘power’ than the Inlander whose only action is to vote for a party bloc.

All politics is local? sometimes? (and might beg questioning about having more local powers)

best

Liked by 1 person

6. oliverbohs - November 10, 2016

Can think of a time back in the 1930s and 40s when a certain US president seemed, if not exemplary, a beacon of hope to some degree. Arguably only with George W in the last 100 years has there been a president that seriously undermined America’s propaganda of exceptionality. Till Jan 20th. Culturally the US have been so dominant, whatever you think of that. Now that Americans themselves have demonstrated their faith in the 21st century George Wallace….

Like

Starkadder - November 10, 2016

A friend said to me “Now that Trump is President, suddenly the idea of China replacing the US as top superpower isn’t so worrying anymore.”

He paused, and added, “Of course, I’m not a Tibetan.”

Anyway, four US states raised the minimum wage this week:

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-wages-idUSKBN1343Q1

Like

7. Joe - November 11, 2016

Sign of hope. I saw a headline that the Austrians are missing three of their top players for Saturday’s game.
(Time to concentrate on the important things again after that yankee distraction.)

Like

8. Gewerkschaftler - November 11, 2016

Despite its contradictions, I see DiEM25 as a sign of hope.

Here’s Brian Eno:

Is there any good news? My post-Brexit feeling – after the initial shock and disappointment – is that there is, along with a lot of danger and uncertainty. Liberal America will now have to take a good hard look at itself, as Liberal England has been doing. There has never been so much future-oriented socio-political discussion here, never so much a sense of ‘We haven’t been paying attention’. New groups and coalitions are springing up daily and the whole landscape is changing. Everyone is thinking…effectively trying to save or if necessary reinvent liberal democracy.

One reassuring side to this though: it destroys any conspiracy theories about secretive cabals pulling the strings. They weren’t in this at all. It’s very conspicuous that even FOX was taken by surprise; that even the revolting Koch’s didn’t put their pennies in. This was, for better or worse, a genuine people’s revolution ( – so it can happen).”

I see this as an opportunity – which is why I’m less distressed than my American friends. For years I’ve been hearing ‘We don’t do politics’ from so many intellectuals – as though it’s something shameful, a bit like public masturbation. Now I think perhaps we’ll sideline our Virtual Reality iPads and dreams of Colonies on Mars for a little while and start thinking about what’s happening here, on Earth.

This is a wake-up call for many people. I’m glad that DiEM25 is already awake.

Like

WorldbyStorm - November 12, 2016

Great point re conspiracies and cabals. And iPads and Mars too.

Like

Michael Carley - November 12, 2016

It’s confirmation of Chomsky’s view on conspiracy theories: why bother, if you want to know what’s happening in the world, it’s all in the papers if you read them properly.

Trump and Brexit were there to be seen coming.

Liked by 1 person

sonofstan - November 12, 2016

I find myself warming to Eno again despite his compliicity in U2’s career.

Liked by 2 people

CL - November 12, 2016

‘This was, for better or worse, a genuine people’s revolution.’-Brian Eno
https://yanisvaroufakis.eu/2016/11/09/trump-is-a-wake-up-call-i-am-glad-diem25-is-awake-brian-eno/

‘It is very similar to late Weimar Germany,…

If somebody comes along who is charismatic and honest this country is in real trouble because of the frustration, disillusionment, the justified anger and the absence of any coherent response. What are people supposed to think if someone says ‘I have got an answer, we have an enemy’? There it was the Jews. Here it will be the illegal immigrants and the blacks. We will be told that white males are a persecuted minority. We will be told we have to defend ourselves and the honor of the nation. Military force will be exalted. People will be beaten up. This could become an overwhelming force. And if it happens it will be more dangerous than Germany. The United States is the world power. Germany was powerful but had more powerful antagonists. I don’t think all this is very far away. If the polls are accurate it is not the Republicans but the right-wing Republicans, the crazed Republicans, who will sweep the next election.”-Chomsky, 2010
http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/noam_chomsky_has_never_seen_anything_like_this_20100419#14789505685141&action=collapse_widget&id=0&data=

A peoples revolution? No.

Like

WorldbyStorm - November 12, 2016

Yes, I think he’s wrong about that too CL. But I think his broader point isn’t entirely incorrect.

Like

9. RosencrantzisDead - November 12, 2016

Obama has given up on TPP.

Following Trump’s election, Republicans are unwilling to back a free trade agreement given the widespread discontent.

I do not know what will now happen to TTIP, but the effect is is unlikely to smooth passage.

Beyond the wails about America being full of racists and there is nothing we can do, some people seem to have picked up on another thread that people have not reaped great benefits from free trade.

Hopefully, a left group will be able to divert this discontent away from fascism and the alt. Right.

Liked by 1 person

6to5against - November 12, 2016

I wonder about TTiP and Trump.

I know he mouthed off about them on the campaign trail. But trade deals like this are basicaly being put into place at the behest of the Corporate world.

Whatever about his feeling on the matter – and regardless of the very short amount of time I believe he has put into thinking about it at all – his backers in congress are going to want to force this through in some form or other, and I cant see him being too bothered about stopping it.

Like

RosencrantzisDead - November 12, 2016

True, and I would be sceptical of any promise by a Republican to undo free trade. Most analysts were sceptical about whether Trump would have nay impact on Free Trade deals, particularly since a Republican congress would ant to ensure their corporate backers got their heart’s desire

However, this is an instance where the Republicans have refused to support a free trade and on the basis that there is substantial public opposition. An interesting turn in my view.

I think it presents an opportunity which can be seized by a left organization (whether a politicsl party or a labour movement).

Like

CL - November 12, 2016

“It is telling that the break with neoliberalism has come from the right…
History may look on Hillary Clinton’s struggle for the presidency as the closing act in the neoliberal experiment…
that she is identified with this failed experiment and with those who have most profited from it that casts the longest shadow over her candidacy….
If the 1980s were a time when the global market was expanding, our time is one in which globalisation is stalled and fragmenting. Idle dreams of a global free market have yielded to geopolitical rivalries, while anxious populations want safety more than fast-increasing material prosperity. A circulation of elites is under way, in which those that cling to the neoliberal past are being replaced by others that understand the present….
http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2016/09/new-times-john-gray-moving-right-new-times

Like

WorldbyStorm - November 12, 2016

For once Nik Cohen seems to be reaching to his old self…

” Thinking about class, not instead of but along with gender and race, would be a step forward”

Liked by 1 person

Michael Carley - November 12, 2016

Might depend on which bit of the corporate world he decides to favour: you could imagine a situation where a trade deal which protects one US industry, balanced by protection for an industry in another country or bloc, would appeal to certain elements of the corporate world. To put it another way: it’s not ridiculous to imagine a protectionist deal which allowed indigenous capital to scalp indigenous consumers.

Like

WorldbyStorm - November 12, 2016

+1

Like

10. FergusD - November 12, 2016

Protectionism could be the new thing. The danger is the left won’t have a clear response. Protectionism could plunge the world into deep recession and conflict. I hope that is an overly pessimistic view.

Liked by 1 person

WorldbyStorm - November 12, 2016

What is telling is that social democracy wasn’t able to fashion, or didn’t appreciate, a means of avoiding protectionism and maintaining and extending workers rights.

Like

Michael Carley - November 12, 2016

The one-time social democratic parties gave up on social democracy a long time ago, and thought they’d get away with it because workers had nowhere else to go, not thinking that if people are offered a choice between reactionary pandering and the genuine article, they’ll either choose the real thing, or choose nothing.

Like

CL - November 12, 2016

“European social democracy had made its peace with globalisation a couple of decades ago, in the form of Blairite centrism or the kind of neoliberal reformism engineered by Gerhard Schröder’s Social Democrats in the 2000s….
But the broader failure of the left was the same one made in the lead-up to 1914 and the Great war, when, in the apt phrase of the British-Czech philosopher, Ernest Gellner, a letter sent to a mailbox marked “class” was mistakenly delivered to one marked “nation.”…
America’s choice last Tuesday signifies a switching of sides from the liberal internationalist camp, to the populist nationalist one.” Francis Fukuyama.
https://www.ft.com/content/6a43cf54-a75d-11e6-8b69-02899e8bd9d1

History has returned.

Is Merkel now the leader of the ‘free world’?

Like

11. Starkadder - November 13, 2016

D. D. Guttenplan has some good news in his long Nation piece on
Trump:

 Obama remains not only a hugely popular president but a symbol of, and spokesman for, the very diversity, civility, and tolerance threatened by Trump’s election, and could, if he chooses, help lead the fight, along with Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and newly elected progressives like Pramila Jayapal and Jamie Raskin, whose victories last night were like beacons in the darkness.

https://www.thenation.com/article/welcome-to-the-fight/

Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: