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Wales and the RoI November 29, 2016

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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If someone had told me this I don’t think I’d have believed them, but in this new world we live in it somehow makes more sense than a lot of other stuff I’ve read.

The Welsh government is being urged to open talks with Ireland in an attempt to secure continued access to European funding after Brexit, under a plan by Plaid Cymru.
The party believes it can take a leaf out of Norway’s book. The country gets EU funding despite not being a member, thanks to a partnership with Sweden.
“The Welsh government cannot afford to play ‘wait and see’ with Wales’s future relations with our nearest neighbours and must think creatively in order to further Wales’s interests post-Brexit,” said the party’s external affairs spokesman, Steffan Lewis.

And:

He made his call for a new Celtic Sea alliance on the first of two days of biannual talks at the British-Irish parliamentary assembly in Cardiff.
It says that the Belfast agreement provides for bilateral deals even if the UK quits the EU. Lewis believes such an alliance could mitigate the economic impact of Brexit on Wales and Ireland, which is already being hit by the fall of the pound.
The exit from the EU could have devastating consequences on the economy of Wales, where the vast majority voted for Brexit.

As SoS noted, the vast majority did not vote for Brexit in Wales. It was just about 52%. But beyond that isn’t it fascinating to see the devolved governments beginning to flex their muscles?

And this is just remarkable:

There may also be an opportunity for Ireland and Wales to dip into EU inter-region funds, known as Interreg.

Norway and Sweden share €73m (£62m) from Interreg funds for programmes designed to protect vulnerable border regions, in terms of environment, employment and social cohesion.
The notion that Wales could continue to benefit from EU funds comes as similar attempts are made in sectors such as education and science, which are heavily dependent on EU funds.
British universities are considering plans to open branches inside the European Union to soften the blow of Britain’s exit.

I wonder if such side deals are possible, and yet, there’s a certain logic to using the pre-existing links between Dublin and Cardiff and indeed Dublin and Scotland to assist.

Comments»

1. simonjkyte - November 29, 2016

they do actually have an accord between them

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2. EWI - November 29, 2016

Whatever about NI (part of the nation) or Scotland, both of which voted against Brexit, I think Wales is going to have to lie in the bed it made for itself.

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Gewerkschaftler - November 29, 2016

Really?

Wouldn’t it be tactically better to split Wales from England on this matter? From RoI’s purely nationalist point of view a greater flexibility and difference between governments in parts of the larger island to the east would be a good thing, I would have thought.

I doubt, on the basis of contacts I have there, that there would be majority for Brexit in Wales if the referendum were conducted today.

But that, of course, is an assertion I can’t prove.

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EWI - November 29, 2016

I can’t help but feel that, quite unlike the other two, special statis for Wales would really act as a way for England to have its cake and eat it as regards Brexit, a way to cheat the consequences of their decisions.

My idea of the country is that they will now never get a majority in favour of independence, given the large numbers of English who have settled there.

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Gewerkschaftler - November 29, 2016

That’s a good point – I guess special status would be gamed to the hilt. See NI.

And you’re right about the desire for nominal independence in Wales, EWI. It’s not coming any time soon.

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3. soubresauts - November 29, 2016

Another possible source of Welsh funding from Europe: Ask Gareth Bale for a tithe.

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4. Joe - November 29, 2016

EU funds to tart up Holyhead? I’m all in favour.

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sonofstan - November 29, 2016

+1

They could give us some handy tips on linguistic independence

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5. Peter James - November 29, 2016

Aren’t there big differences between Norway and Wales?
1. Norway pays into the EU, thus it is only getting some of it’s own money back.
2. Norway is a sovereign state, Wales is a region of UK.

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sonofstan - November 29, 2016

‘Wales is a region of the U.K.’

I wouldn’t recommend saying that out loud anywhere west of Offa’s Dyke.

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