jump to navigation

What you want to say – 25th January, Week 4, 2017 January 25, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
trackback

As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

Advertisements

Comments»

1. Admin - January 25, 2017
2. GW - January 25, 2017

The following is from Robert Reich (I won’t include the TaxevasionBook link). Now he has an interest in promoting infighting within the US Republicans, but the following is to me plausible. What do others think?

I had breakfast recently with a friend who’s a former Republican member of Congress. Here’s what he said:

Him: Trump is no Republican. He’s just a big fat ego.

Me: Then why didn’t you speak out against him during the campaign?

Him: You kidding? I was surrounded by Trump voters. I’d have been shot.

Me: So what now? What are your former Republican colleagues going to do?

Him (smirking): They’ll play along for a while.

Me: A while?

Him: They’ll get as much as they want – tax cuts galore, deregulation, military buildup, slash all those poverty programs, and then get to work on Social Security and Medicare – and blame him. And he’s such a fool he’ll want to take credit for everything.

Me: And then what?

Him (laughing): They like Pence.

Me: What do you mean?

Him: Pence is their guy. They all think Trump is out of his mind.

Me: So what?

Him: So the moment Trump does something really dumb – steps over the line – violates the law in a big stupid clumsy way … and you know he will …

Me: They impeach him?

Him: You bet. They pull the trigger.

And will the fact that some much is being implemented by Presidential decree perhaps make Americans consider a change of constitution? If they ever get a chance.

Like

Alibaba - January 25, 2017

The Republican infighting is ‘plausible’. Also, wouldn’t it be ironic if Republicans were to try to impeach Trump? I wouldn’t rule out that prospect given how overwhelmed and dumbfounded the liberals are.

Like

GW - January 25, 2017

What I find most convincing is that the Republicans will let Trump do all that they would like to do but think would alienate too many of their supporters, and then at some time pull the plug on him, and possibly roll some of them back somewhat.

We’ve seen this kind of Machiavellian alliance between the ‘conventional’ right and fascist spectrum politicians as stalking horses before, and the results have not been good.

And meanwhile everyone outside a small elite suffers the consequences.

Like

Starkadder - January 25, 2017

“We’ve seen this kind of Machiavellian alliance between the ‘conventional’ right and fascist spectrum politicians as stalking horses before, and the results have not been good.”

Aye. Particularly as Trump has a hard core of supporters who are fanatically loyal to him and don’t care if traditional Republicans hate them. And a lot of those supporters have also been saturated in Alex Jones-ish conspiracy theories about how “the elites” and “globalists” are out to get their darling.

They also have access to plentiful firearms (YIKES!).

Like

WorldbyStorm - January 25, 2017

+1

Like

6to5against - January 25, 2017

Its a convincing enough scenario, all right, but I wonder how it will play out when they turn against him. As Clinton showed us, impeachment doesn’t mean you have to leave office. Can you see Trump rolling over in those circumstances?

I can see him locking himself in the white house and refusing to leave under any circumstances, while he stokes anger and violence amongst the most deluded of his followers.

Like

Alibaba - January 25, 2017

Fair point 6to5against. And it stands very well. But let us not forget the fact that Clinton wasn’t actually impeached in the end.

The senate did not reach the two-thirds majority needed to fully process Clinton’s impeachment. Clinton was impeached by the House on two charges. The first being perjury, and the second being obstruction of justice. Following this he was acquitted by the senate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impeachment_of_Bill_Clinton

Like

Ed - January 25, 2017

Has there been a fully fledged impeachment, ever? If I remember rightly, Nixon was staring down the barrels of impeachment but he jumped before he was pushed.

Like

JC - January 25, 2017

Two impeachment trials — Andrew Johnson and Clinton — but no successful impeachment votes. Nixon resigned.

Liked by 2 people

6to5against - January 25, 2017

As I understand it, Clinton was impeached by the House of Reps – which means the charges were then sent forward to the senate for a trial. I think it was actually called a trial at that stage, but perhaps that was just in the press.

The senate voted to support the charges, but not by a sufficient majority to remover him from office. I think it needs a 2/3 majority.

I tried to verify all that just now but its a bit of a politicised swamp trying to read through it all.

But if I have it right, Clinton was in fact impeached – on charges that were supported by the senate – and he still survived in office.

It seems to me that Trump could pull that off too.

Like

CL - January 25, 2017

Andrew Johnson and Clinton were impeached. In the US impeachment is an accusation, an indictment, carried out by the House of Representatives. The trial of that impeachment is carried out by the Senate. In both the Johnson and Clinton cases the Senate did not have the necessary two thirds majority to convict, so neither was removed from office. But it is correct to say that both were impeached.

Like

6to5against - January 25, 2017

It is. I didn’t mean to turn it into a didactic discussion on the exact meaning of the word ‘impeachment,’ though.

I suppose my point is that, in numerical terms, Trump only needs 34 senators on board – out of all of congress – in order to keep office.

Like

CL - January 25, 2017

The Dow Jones has now breached the 20,000 mark in anticipation of a Trump fiscal stimulus. Goldman Sachs shares lead the way having increased 29 per cent since Trump’s election.

Like

Alibaba - January 26, 2017

Thanks for the clarification folks. I didn’t realise the impeachment process is more complex and the Senate has never convicted a President.

Like

3. sonofstan - January 25, 2017

Amused by this in Guardian piece on Burns’ night and Hugh MacDiarmid:
“someone who, in his Who’s Who entry, described his hobby as “Anglophobia”.

Like

4. Starkadder - January 25, 2017
oconnorlysaght - January 30, 2017

There is, of course, a small but influential tradition of anti-semitic Zionism. Its members include two British PMs, Balfour (of the Declaration) and Eden (of Suez). The rationale of this is to get the Jews out of ones own country and have them make safe the middle east, rather than have good gentiles in the front line there. It seems likely that a very large number of Trumpites are of this way of thinking, probably including the Donald himself, though the military basis for this seems to be declining.

Like

5. Pasionario - January 25, 2017

What do people think about the BDS campaign against Israel?

It’s possible that I may be offered a job in a private Israeli academic institution that seems to have a liberal Zionist bent and is regularly attacked by Likudniks. The alternative to this job may very well be unemployment. What should I do?

Like

Michael Carley - January 25, 2017

Take the job.

Like

ivorthorne - January 26, 2017

What happens if you take the job? What happens if you do not take the job?

How complicit is the institution? If the complicit actions are of a relatively minor nature, will you be in a position to oppose them if you take the position?

Like

Starkadder - January 26, 2017

My position is, if the institution is opposed to the mistreatment of
Palestinians, take the job if you wish.

Like

Pasionario - January 26, 2017

Thanks for these comments. The institution seems to be aligned with what passes for the Zionist centre-left in Israel — i.e. Labor and Meretz. They’re pro-two-state solution and anti-settlements and take a lot of flack from the Israeli right.

Like

WorldbyStorm - January 26, 2017

I’m more and more struck by how politics in Israel has in a way paved a toxic path for Trump, not least in terms of ‘walls’, and how that then reflects back into Israel in terms of the support for the government. I think progressive voices there are going to be very isolated. To me, as a two-statist, being anti-settlement is the key. There is no space political or otherwise for two states if there are settlements, it is that simple. And that’s the key dividing line, if they’re on the right side of that line then standing with them seems fine. IT’s questions are interesting because what you say suggests the institution is positioned against settlements etc.

Like

EWI - January 26, 2017

Take the job! Anyone with half a brain can differentiate between the Likudniks and everyone else (as the BDS people are well capable of doing, incidentally).

Like

Pasionario - January 27, 2017

Agreed, but BDS does not in fact differentiate. They are in favour of a blanket boycott.

Like

makedoanmend - January 27, 2017

I’m not qualified to offer job advice but my viewpoint is that any group (in this case BDS) that uses blanket bans or terminology is not a good arbitrator of what one should do.

In fact, if the “good” institution or group is fighting the good fight, I’d say that is reason enough to engage with them. Boycotting an entire category of people because some or even a majority aren’t acting to one’s viewpoint is self defeating.

Is it not our “job” to engage so that we might, even at the atomtistic (?) level, wield what influence we can?

Whatever your choice, good luck.

Like

6. lcox - January 25, 2017

Just uploaded a working paper on the water charges movement, at https://www.academia.edu/31075937/The_Irish_water_charges_movement_theorising_the_social_movement_in_general. Comments very welcome! Hope it’s of interest.

Like

CMK - January 25, 2017

Looks interesting. I looked through the contents pages of every edition on ‘Irish Political Studies’ published since 2011 and there is zero, from what I can see, mention of any of the resistance to austerity here, in that publication. Indeed, there are two articles on the ‘Flags’ protests in Belfast but none, as I said, on the water charges movement.

Like

lcox - January 26, 2017

There is the Cannon / Murphy piece from the 2015 issue which I criticise in the introduction.

But yes, there is close to no serious research done on the movement as a movement (other than by some students who deserve serious kudos for jumping in where academics fear to tread) and this is part of the reason for trying to think about the whole thing systematically.

In fairness this is part of a wider pattern where academics (and some writers on the left) are much more comfortable researching “serious” things like structure, policy and political parties and at best talk about movements as a sort of sidenote which doesn’t apparently need any systematic thought. Pub talk doubles as theory / research on movements but not when it comes to the “serious” stuff, seemingly.

Like

GW - January 27, 2017

Will read – thanks Icox.

Like

lcox - January 27, 2017

Cheers! BTW if anyone is interested there is an online discussion session at https://www.academia.edu/s/856004805f/the-irish-water-charges-movement-theorising-the-social-movement-in-general with some interesting comments so far.

Like

7. Phil F - January 26, 2017

An article that John Smith sent us for Redline blog. John’s the author of the excellent new study ‘Imperialism in the twenty-first century’ (New York: Monthly Review Press). In this article he looks at how the Third World has borne the brunt of capitalist austerity since the end of the postwar boom in the early 1970s:

“The attack on organised labour and working people in Europe, Japan and the USA, through intensification of labour, wage repression and cuts in social spending, was on its own nothing like enough to allow capitalism to escape from the systemic crisis of the 1970s. The most important contribution to the resumption of capitalist accumulation in its heartlands was the surplus-value extracted from hundreds of millions of workers in the export-oriented industries of the Third World (or Global South) and captured by imperialist transnational corporations (TNCs) and their suppliers as profits and by imperialist states through taxation. Once again, systemic crisis propelled capitalism along an imperialist trajectory. . . ”

full at: https://rdln.wordpress.com/2017/01/26/imperialism-and-the-capitalist-offensive-in-the-first-and-third-worlds/

Like

8. Starkadder - January 26, 2017

High-ranking Russian officer in cyberintelligence unit (that allegedly hacked US election) arrested for treason:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com//news/world/top-russian-spy-official-arrested-on-treason-charges/article33766836/?cmpid=rss1&click=sf_globe

Like

EWI - January 26, 2017

Supposedly he’s being fingered as having told the Anericans details of Russian hacker operations.

Like

9. CL - January 26, 2017

‘New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman said Wednesday that Trump “lacks the constitutional authority to cut off funding to states and cities simply because they have lawfully acted to protect immigrant families.

“Local governments seeking to protect their immigrant communities from federal overreach have every right to do so,” Schneiderman said in a statement.’
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jan/25/sanctuary-cities-trump-executive-order-immigration

‘At least 39 cities and 364 counties around the United States already count themselves as sanctuary jurisdictions, according to the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, though they vary in how severely they restrict immigration enforcement.’

Like

CL - January 26, 2017

‘Trump is gearing up to deputize cities as the foot soldiers in his fight to round up illegal immigrants. But to do so without help from Congress, he must first rely on an unusually expansive interpretation of federal law to find sanctuary cities illegal. That likely means a court battle is imminent, the first turn in a political reversal that will define the Trump era: a GOP administration grasping for federal power pitted against states and cities trumpeting local control. At stake are the livelihoods of millions of immigrant families that have made sanctuary jurisdictions from Boston to Portland, Oregon, home.’
http://www.slate.com/articles/business/metropolis/2017/01/trump_s_siege_of_sanctuary_cities_has_begun.html

States rights?

‘The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.’ 10th Amendment to U.S Constitution.

Like

10. Michael Carley - January 26, 2017

Might be of interest to some here (I am reading it and it is excellent).

Like

11. dublinstreams - January 26, 2017

how did Cllr Siobhan Ambrose spend €4.700 originally from public funding during election http://www.sipo.gov.ie/en/Reports/Election-Reports/D%C3%A1il-General-Election-26-February-2016/EES-Candidates-A-B.pdf … pg 52/53

Not suggesting she did anything wrong just wondering how it happened, its lot of money to come originally of public funds for a councillor even if reimbursed later.

Like

12. Michael Carley - January 26, 2017

Conservative MP Bob Stewart has said he was “kind of a torturer” during his time as a soldier in Northern Ireland’s Troubles in the 1970s.

The former Army officer said that torture is “sometimes” justified, and he had used now-forbidden techniques.

The UK government authorised the use of five interrogation methods during the Troubles but later reversed that move.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-38758940?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_politics&ns_source=twitter&ns_linkname=news_central

Like

EWI - January 26, 2017

I hope he enjoys repeating that in front of a judge some day.

Liked by 1 person

13. Alibaba - January 26, 2017
14. EWI - January 26, 2017

Arch poppy-wearer Frank Feighan is fluffing the notion of Irish re-entry to the British Empire Commonwealth for all it’s worth (much to the delight of the English far-right):

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/758840/Ireland-joining-Commonwealth-Politician-campaign

John Bruton must be in tears at having to keep his mouth shut.

Like

ivorthorne - January 26, 2017

That’s Frank who once saw a UFO?

To be fair, Ireland joining the Federation of Planets is currently about as likely as re-joining the Commonwealth. The direction that the UK (or at least England) had taken is not one most Irish people want anything to do with.

Like

EWI - January 26, 2017

I’d share your estimate*, but at the same time, giving comfort to the British Brexiting right is very questionable behaviour for a member of a party which is supposedly fully committed to the EU.

* the sideways slithering into joint military missions with the British at EU, NATO and UN levels is presumably dead. And God knows the ultimate outcome of the unilateral British abandonment of the Good Friday Agreement.

Like

15. CL - January 27, 2017

A reply to William Reville by David Robert Grimes.

“The essentialist mindset that there is some genetic or intrinsic trait that defines an ethnic group or culture has no scientific basis…
white skin is a relatively recent mutation…
Far from being an essentialist trait, the emergence of white skin as a common phenotype required the sustained interbreeding of many cultures.
http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/immigration-will-enhance-irish-culture-not-dilute-it-1.2950711

Like

WorldbyStorm - January 27, 2017

Excellent piece by Grimes I thought.

Like

16. GW - January 27, 2017

The chances of a Le Pen victory in May just increased.

The Thatcherite creature that will probably oppose her in May is mired in a standard-issue ‘paying the wife for political work that she didn’t do’ scandal. We’ve had a few of those in Ireland – mentioning no names.

Like

GW - January 27, 2017

And – shades of another presidential election – the current polling (for what that’s worth these days) shows Macron would do better than the Thatcherite against Le Pen.

Like

Pasionario - January 27, 2017

Macron’s a bit of Thatcherite himself. He also strikes me as a lightweight. I am impressed, however, that he ended up marrying his secondary-school literature teacher (if that’s not too frivolous a point to make).

I’d say the wheel of fortune has many more turns to make before we can get a read on what’s going to happen in France. Fillon’s problem is that he’s set himself as a paragon of virtue — the anti-Sarkozy. Now he just looks like any other grasping pol.

Like

WorldbyStorm - January 27, 2017

I found that kind of impressive too. Not sure why.

Like

17. Tomboktu - January 29, 2017

Like

sonofstan - January 29, 2017

may will be long gone by 2020

Like

sonofstan - January 29, 2017

It now seems that ‘sir’ Mo Farah would be denied access to the US, alonf with an Iraqi born Tory MP.

Like

sonofstan - January 29, 2017

“Theresa May does “not agree” with Donald Trump’s refugee ban and will appeal to the US if it affects British citizens”

Like

ivorthorne - January 29, 2017

It would be great to get a bunch of high profile people from those affected countries together and give them a free trip to the US.

Like

18. 6to5against - January 29, 2017

Been listening to this all morning. It seems to fit the times…..

Liked by 1 person

19. sonofstan - January 29, 2017

‘Women for Independence’ have raised the money for Hamaseh Tayari, an Iranian vet working in Glasgow, to find an alternative flight home after she was refused permission to transfer flights at JFK. Superb statement.

“Caskie said: “Firstly, she works in Glasgow, so therefore is now Glaswegian, and you don’t cross Glaswegians, and secondly, we hate Trump and, finally, our reach is such that we could raise the money by midnight tonight if she needs it”

Liked by 2 people

20. sonofstan - January 29, 2017
21. CL - January 29, 2017

‘By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump’s executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.’
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/01/29/512272524/of-courts-and-confusion-heres-the-reaction-to-trumps-immigration-freeze

Trump, the Lord of Misrule, has created a state of chassis

Looks like a a popular front of resistance is developing. A psychopathic response can be expected from Trump.

Like

22. sonofstan - January 29, 2017

The leader of the nationalist Social Democratic and Labour Party Colum Eastwood confirmed today he will boycott Donald Trump’s hosting of the Shamrock-tinged shindig this year.

Stoops not stooping. Will Adams go?

Like

CL - January 29, 2017

“I have to say, I never really subscribed to that notion of a left-wing government, certainly not in the short-term. I mean, who are the left?”-Gerry Adams

Will he go to the White House?
Sinn Féin, he says, repudiates the views and comments of US president Donald Trump. Then he adds: “In principle, if we were invited, yes.”
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/interview-gerry-adams-casts-doubt-on-future-of-ni-executive-1.2952790

https://my.uplift.ie/petitions/shamrock-not-in-my-name?bucket=&source=twitter-share-button

Like

23. roddy - January 29, 2017

Adams has just issued the strongest of statements condemning Trump’s ban on muslims,saying it runs counter to international standards,equalityand decency, congratulates the airport protestors, and calls on the Irish government not to allow Irish airports to be used to enforce the ban and says he wants a meeting with Kenny to highlight this.

Liked by 1 person

sonofstan - January 29, 2017

http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/43255

Link to Adams’ statement

Like

24. CL - January 29, 2017

2012.
‘Archbishop Desmond Tutu has pulled out of an international summit because he doesn’t want to share a platform with the “morally indefensible” Tony Blair, it emerged yesterday.’
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/politics/desmond-tutu-quits-summit-with-tony-blair-over-invasion-of-iraq-8084805.html

Like

25. Starkadder - January 30, 2017

Shooting at a mosque in Quebec; several people dead:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-38793071

This is awful. 😦

Like

Starkadder - January 30, 2017

The Montreal Holocaust Museum Center has issued a statement of solidarity with the victims of the Quebec shooting.

http://forward.com/culture/361609/montreal-holocaust-museum-issues-statement-of-solidarity-after-quebec-mosqu/

Like

26. Michael Carley - January 30, 2017

Can anyone who knows something about French politics say if this is good news?

Benoît Hamon, the staunchly leftwing rebel outsider who wants to introduce a universal basic income, legalise cannabis and tax robots has been chosen as the French Socialist party’s presidential candidate.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/29/french-socialists-leftwing-rebel-benoit-hamon-elysee-manuel-valls-francois-hollande-presidency

Like

ivorthorne - January 30, 2017

This is how the robot revolution will begin! No taxation without representation!

Liked by 1 person

Ed - January 30, 2017

I’d say it’s reasonably good news in the medium term (i.e. after the presidential election). Too late to make much difference to the prospects for the PS, they’ll probably still be outpolled by Macron on the right and Melenchon on the left, too late at this point to repair the damage done by Hollande and Valls; and the total vote for Hamon and Melenchon probably won’t be massive either. But there’s bound to be a lot of regroupment and realignment on the French left after this election, and if the PS base are leaning left rather than right, that’s a promising sign for what comes next. But it’s still going to be a shit-show between now and the presidential vote.

Like

Liberius - January 30, 2017

The most recent poll, from Kantor, has Hamon on 15% assuming Bayrou doesn’t run, with Macron at 21%, Fillion at 22% and Le Pen at 25%. Melenchon would on the face of it seem to take a hit with Hamon as the candidate as he’s on only 10% in this poll (he’s been hovering at around 14-15% lately). This is Kantor’s first poll since November on the presidential election, back then they were on a par with the other polling firms, so that might be a guide to both dropping support for Fillion and better support for Hamon compared to before the primary campaign where he was only polling about 8% from the likes of Ipsos. Of course this is only Kantor, and a good few months out from the election, so watch this space.

BTW, I finished reading Ascent a few days ago, very good read, thank you Michael for the recommendation.

http://www.lefigaro.fr/elections/presidentielles/2017/01/29/35003-20170129ARTFIG00201-presidentielle-fillon-et-macron-au-coude-a-coude-le-pen-en-tete.php

Like

27. sonofstan - January 30, 2017

https://www.socialeurope.eu/2017/01/go-home-uk-order-to-eu-academics/

The Home Office and the way they might look at you

Like

RosencrantzisDead - January 30, 2017

I clicked on your name, SOS, and got a flashing red warning that this was a phishing website.

Times really are hard in academia…

Like

sonofstan - January 30, 2017

Entrapment. I pose for years as a leftie to lure others into my net. If only wordpress’ security settings weren’t so high I’d have gotten away with it.

(need to look into it. ….)

Like

Michael Carley - January 30, 2017

Replace the `@’ with a `.’ and it should be fine.

Like

28. dublinstreams - January 30, 2017

Mick Wallace, Clare Daly and Senator Paul Gavan have been making mistaken claims about cluster bombs going through Shannon Airport based on a misreading of DTTAS FOI’d docs via Shannonwatch. http://dublinstreams.blogspot.ie/2016/12/td-and-senator-claim-cluster-bombs.html I tried to get Wallace and Gavan to clarify but they didn’t reply so now their mistakes have reported in 2 national newspapers :/ Gavan admitted his mistake while Wallace won’t reply to anyone. This harms the cause of trying to end foreign military traffic through Ireland, unfortunately those associated with Shannonwatch are prone to over claiming.

Like

29. Michael Carley - January 30, 2017

Oxford course on the Palestinian revolution:
http://learnpalestine.politics.ox.ac.uk/

Like

30. CL - January 30, 2017

The worldwide popular movement against Trump is growing at a rapid, unprecedented rate.

‘ We’re witnessing the stirrings of a national popular movement aimed at defeating the policies of Mr. Trump.’

Like

sonofstan - January 30, 2017

Was outside downing st tonight with an unguessable number of people. Apparently there were speakers, but, not only could i not hear them, i couldn’t even work out where they might be. Got there early-ish when the cops were still letting traffic through both ways. Eventuall y it filled up so quickly that a couple of buses were stranded until escorted through. By the end it appeared to stretch from trafalgar sq all the way to parliament square. Lots of placards working on the rhyme (in SE English) of ‘Theresa’ and ‘appeaser’. Favourite though was the crude but effective ‘impeach the c*nt’

Like

CL - January 30, 2017

Well its been ten days since emperor Trump took power. Ten days that…? Some video here of the London video.
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/donald-trump-protests-live-updates-9722992

Its early days yet. Maybe there will be an ‘American Spring’.

Like

Alibaba - January 31, 2017

That reminds me of ‘Thatcher, Thatcher, Milk Snatcher’. She stopped the provision of milk for school pupils in 1970 when she was education secretary.

‘Impeach the cunt’ for Trump is pitch-perfect too.

Like

sonofstan - January 31, 2017

As i was walking along the embankment after leaving the demo, along with lots of people still carrying banners, a homeless guy, a little the worse for wear started chanting ‘Maggie, Maggie, Maggie! out,out out!’

Whether sarcasm or nostalgia, i couldn’t tell…..

Like

CL - January 31, 2017

More good news:
The ACLU received more than $24 million in online donations from 356,306 people, a spokesman told The Washington Post early Monday morning, a total that supersedes its annual online donations by six times.”
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/01/30/the-aclu-says-it-got-24-million-in-donations-this-weekend-six-times-its-yearly-average/?utm_term=.839c516d801b

Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: