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Behold a brave new world of post-Brexit UK immigration control… February 14, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Theresa May’s attempt to reclaim control of UK borders after Brexit could reduce annual migration from the EU by just 50,000 – one-sixth of the current overall annual figure, according to new research.

Sorry. What? 50k? Come again?

The report by a new thinktank, Global Future, shows total net immigration, which at the latest official estimate was 335,000 in the year to June 2016, could be expected to fall by no more than 15%, to 285,000 a year. Future free trade deals with non-EU countries suggests even this reduction could be wiped out.

Oh yeah, perhaps some have forgotten that for those free trade deals there might be trade-offs in relation to immigration to and from the UK.

I won’t deny that immigration control isn’t high on my list of priorities – but as the article itself makes clear in relation to the referendum one very salient point – and one that the Tories have run with subsequently.

The projection of a “vanishingly small reduction” is one of the first attempts to estimate how likely labour market demand, and the government’s planned new controls, could reduce the number of migrants coming to the UK. Reduction in immigrant numbers has been repeatedly cited in polls as the chief reason voters backed leaving the European Union.

This is not going to be pretty.

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1. benmadigan - February 14, 2017

Sort of off topic but talking about a Brave New World – people might enjoy this 1958 interview on American TV with Aldous Huxley

https://eurofree3.wordpress.com/2017/02/11/aldous-huxley-todays-brave-new-world/

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2. sonofstan - February 14, 2017

Not pretty at all. The problem at the moment is that, for ‘Britons’, Brexit has had very little effect on their thinking or their planning for the future. Everything still looks the same. But I was talking to a student yesterday, from another EU country, who was trying to work out whether to take an internship in her home country next year after she graduates, or do her best to stay in the UK for the next couple of years and try and gain residency. The idea that decisions made now may have a huge effect on what you can or can’t do in the future is one EU residents here, and probably Brits elsewhere in the union are coping with right now.

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