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The Dutch General Election March 15, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Polls close. Turnout seems to have been high. And Liberius has an exit poll here. Very interesting result if accurate. Very interesting.

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1. lamentreat - March 16, 2017

Very interesting is right. Mainstream social democrats almost in oblivion. And the curious fact emerges – at least to me, I knew almost nothing about Dutch politics – that the current prime minister also works one morning a week as a schoolteacher. Unusual.

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2. GW - March 16, 2017

Well – in summary – things remain bad but at least they didn’t get dramatically worse.

Positive positives:

1) An austerity government that pushed through cuts in health-care and social services was punished by loosing half the seats of the participating parties.

Positive negatives:

1) Most importantly, the fascist-spectrum party came a poor second.
2) The Dutch didn’t go down the rabbit-hole of imagining that leaving the EU was the royal road to solving their problems with capitalism.

The negative negatives:

a) The next Dutch government will continue to be driven by neo-liberal and austerian policies and provide no leverage for weakening Schäuble’s grip on EU economic policy.
b) The Socialist Party more or less remained stable but was unable to profit from the collapse of the Dutch Labour party.
c) The neo-liberals rhetorically and perhaps in practice took on some of the fascist-spectrum themes

Unknown yet but likely:

Green-Left will do what Greens always do – go into government with larger neo-liberal parties and convince themselves that they are making a difference. I hope I’m wrong on this and the VVD talks the former social democrats into continuing in government.

I don’t know whether this was reported in the anglophone media but the neo-liberal’s relative success (i.e. they lost only a quarter of their seats) was due to a tactically smart and loud controversy over the last few days between the Dutch Prime Minister and would-be Sultan Erdogan about allowing the latter’s people to campaign in the Netherlands for his dictatorship plebiscite.

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An Cathaoirleach - March 16, 2017

No need for the Greens. Election was a stunning victory for the Dutch centre-right. A four party Govt. with the two nominally Liberal parties & two Christian Democratic parties.

With 13 parties in Parliament, varying in degrees of sanity, including a Party for the Animals & a Pensioners’ Party, the danger of coherent opposition able to unite on anything is minimal.

Mr. Rutte can relax for the next five years, knowing that when the voters see the alternative is a rabble, he is safe.

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Liberius - March 16, 2017

A four party Govt. with the two nominally Liberal parties & two Christian Democratic parties.

The CU though are very socially conservative and much less enamoured with free-market yahooism; that’s not a coalition that will be friction free.

Mr. Rutte can relax for the next five years, knowing that when the voters see the alternative is a rabble, he is safe.

D66 and CDA have worked with PvdA before, as has CU, so the alternative is not just those outside of government.

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Jim Monaghan - March 16, 2017
3. Jim Monaghan - March 16, 2017

From a friends f/b site “Alex De Jong shared Laurens Buijs’s post.
2 hrs ·

Laurens Buijs
3 hrs ·
The left lost devastatingly in yesterday’s elections in the Netherlands:

– The Dutch labor party PvdA had the biggest loss in Dutch history, breaking their own record from 2002. They dropped from 38 to 9 seats, a totally justified and understandable punishment for their support of right wing politics and betrayal of social democracy in the last decade(s). So where did their 29 left wing seats go?
– The GreenLeft managed to win 10, going up from 4 to 14 seats. They had a good campaign and are rewarded for rediscovering their left wing roots after years of compromising to neoliberalism. But we are still looking for 19 lost left wing seats:
– The Socialist Party lost a seat and went down from 15 to 14. A terrible result considering the number of left wing seats up for grabs. They also had a terrible campaign, totally bleak. The party is ruled by an anxious group of white male control freaks who are constantly holding back renewal and democratization of the party. So that means the total number of left wing seats lost is now 20:
– The Party for Animals goes up from 2 to 5 seats; like the GreenLeft they are rewarded for their clear leftist positioning in debates on nature, climate and social justice.

So 17 left wing seats have gone up in smoke. We will get a new right wing government with more attacks on the welfare state, more power for corporations and more distrust towards multiculturalism.”

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4. Jim Monaghan - March 16, 2017

Two articles from before the election by my Dutch friend.
TURKEY/NETHERLANDS
In the Netherlands and Turkey: solidarity and resistance to the right-wing campaigns
Tuesday 14 March 2017, by SAP / Grenzeloos, Sosyalist Demokrasi icin Yeniyol
http://www.internationalviewpoint.org/spip.php?article4894
The Netherlands lurches towards elections: Islamophobia, austerity and crisis of the left
Friday 10 March 2017, by Alex de Jong

On March 15, there will be general elections in the Netherlands – and it seems the country will not escape the trend of a rising radical-right and the crisis of the centre-left. But left-wing political parties as well are having difficulties, and social movements are struggling to find their way. A radicalising far-right with a virulent Islamophobia at its core has succeeded in altering the political and social landscape.

It is no use denying that for the Left, the situation is bleak. How did we get here?
from
http://www.internationalviewpoint.org/spip.php?article4891

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5. Gerryboy - March 16, 2017

What is Left and what is Right? Do voters give a toss about political language anymore?

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6. Liberius - March 16, 2017

All municipalities have now reported their result, it is as follows;

VVD 21.3% (33 Seats)
PVV 13.1% (20)
CDA 12.5% (19)
D66 12.0% (19)
SP 9.2% (14)
GL 8.9% (14)
PvdA 5.7% (9)
CU 3.4% (5)
50+ 3.1% (4)
PvdD 3.1% (5)
SGP 2.1% (3)
DENK 2.0% (3)
FvD 1.8% (2)

You can follow the below link if you want a more detailed look.

https://lfverkiezingen.appspot.com/nos/widget/main.html

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