jump to navigation

Dáil dress code March 23, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
trackback

What do people think of this, a parliamentary dress code due – apparently due to ‘complaints’ about the garb of various Deputies. Curious the Seanad doesn’t seem to get the same opprobrium – or at least it is not mentioned. It’s also worth keeping in mind that this is broadly about male TDs dress – interesting the gendered aspects of that and the expectations of same. And even now the majority of TDs who turn up turn up in shirt and tie and jacket.

Part of the problem is what is ‘formal’ or ‘neat’ for that is part of what is advocated. I’m always minded in these discussions to think of Tony Gregory who eschewed the tie, but kept a jacket on. It was certainly neat, and in a way formal enough. But it wasn’t conventional, as the conventions at the time had it.

Anyhow, David Norris in the Seanad made a reasonably good point…

[he] began by booting out the proposal to introduce a new Oireachtas dress code. He feels this is an example of the “increasing bureaucracy” around Leinster House. (He’s right there.)
“People are not going to come in wearing a bikini. If they did, they’d be censured by the House and they would be expelled. I remember Cicciolina in the Italian parliament.”

Advertisements

Comments»

1. irishelectionliterature - March 23, 2017

Really and truly, they have little to be worrying about. Why not just give each Party a Uniform to wear.

Like

Michael Carley - March 23, 2017

Coloured shirts?

Liked by 1 person

WorldbyStorm - March 23, 2017

Hmmm… 😉

+1 IEL

Like

2. deiseach - March 23, 2017

“I remember Cicciolina in the Italian parliament.”

Yes, David, that’s how I remember her too.

Ahem.

Like

3. Goff - March 23, 2017

Ah, the old dress code.

That will come with a clothing allowance.

Don’t start me.

Like

4. GW - March 23, 2017

What are the rules for cross-dressers. Has anyone ruled on that?

Like

5. Aonrud ⚘ - March 23, 2017

It’s such a singularly childish waste of time. There are serious problems to deal with and they’re pissing around with this backward nonsense. Is some FG TD going to get confused because pink shirts are ‘girls clothes’? Put them all in onesies, they’ll be grand.

Like

6. makedoanmend - March 23, 2017

for a class of people who claim to dislike regulations they sure like to regulate

Like

dublinstreams - March 24, 2017

Fianna Failers? its Seán Ó Fearghaíl pursueing this.

Like

7. RosencrantzisDead - March 23, 2017

I understand that the complaints mainly pertain to certain dress with political slogans. Does anyone know if this is true? If so, Armando Ianucci could not make it up.

Like

EWI - March 23, 2017

I know that the poppy-wearers object to the Easter Lily fraternity.

Like

sonofstan - March 23, 2017

The repeal jumpers right?

Like

EWI - March 23, 2017

Irish Water too?

Like

8. Organized Rage (@organizedrage) - March 23, 2017

Dressing alike leads to acting alike that is why there is a parliamentary dress code, they are flagging up they are a member of the club and those on the opposition benches are not enemies but colleagues.

I recently went to a local council meeting in England, it was a long time since i have been to one of these. Yet I was shocked about the uniformity of the clothes worn, grey suits and ties to a man, women slightly more adventurous but not much..

You can look smart with out looking like a manikin in the window of a 1950s Burtons. When the shinners started wearing suits, I remember Brendan Hughes almost spitting out the words ‘The suits’ in a derogatory manner, whether the late Brendan was right then it is for others to say but he was certainly right about the Councillors in the UK who ape their parliamentary so called betters, pitiful is the word I would use. A sports jacket, polo shirt and a pair of trousers or cords is a perfect dress code.

Like

9. irishelectionliterature - March 23, 2017

Now I’m not a politician but I own just the one suit , one that I have had for 10 years. I don’t own a sportsjacket either. Just seems odd that were I to somehow be elected I’d have to buy a whole new wardrobe!

Like

10. oconnorlysaght - March 23, 2017

Stupid, stupid, stupid. ‘We can’t do anything about anything of use to the electors, but at least, we can enact sumptuary legislation.’ And the framers of this would be first in line to criticise the Islamists. They are just proving the point that you don’t have to be a moron to be elected to DE, but it sure helps.
Any deputy with a tittle of independence should oppose this. It affects not only Mick Wallace’ T-shirt but Michael Healy Rae’s flat cap, but perhaps an exception will be made in the latter case, tho’ I can remember when a male wearing headgear indoors was seen as grossly ill mannered.
I fear that this is another shuffle towards regimenting ‘our’ representatives until DE becomes like Hitler’s Reichstag.

Like

sonofstan - March 23, 2017

It’s a strange one; if Mick Wallace showed up in Westminster there would horror – in certain walks of English life, a rigid formality of dress is near-compulsory. But weirdly, in a lot of other areas, almost complete informality is the new norm. People in my profession here dress a lot less formally than their Irish counterparts in my experience, though of course, that’s partial in both cases.
As for the idea that a suit = smart……

Like

Aonrud ⚘ - March 23, 2017

I know people who worked answering calls for an online company that had websites for both UK and Ireland, and the general rule was to use first names for Irish callers, but Mr./Mrs. for the UK site. Only anecdotal, but I assume it arose from a learned difference in expected formality.

Like

Aonrud ⚘ - March 23, 2017

Then again, it’s a while since Kier Hardie upset them all in his flat cap.

Like

sonofstan - March 23, 2017

That’s an interesting one – and true I think; if I’m cold called here in the UK, it’s always Mr….. whereas at home, as you say.
Another weird thing – the use of Ms. is much rarer here than in Ireland.

Like

Aonrud ⚘ - March 23, 2017

I think Ms. is used as an abbreviation for Miss a lot of the time. At least according to an irritated prescriptivist relative of mine 😉

Like

11. Ivorthorne - March 24, 2017

Day in and day out, ministers avoid answering questions that the Dail has every right to know the answer to. If you want to reform something about the Dail and make it look professional, try starting there.

Enda has repeatedly failed to answer Mick Wallace’s questions on NAMA, project Eagle and Garda corruption. In many cases, he’s been proven right to be concerned and Enda has come out looking something between complicit and incompetent. There are idiots who look at those exchanges between Mick and Enda and come to the conclusion that the real scandal is that Wallace wears atypical clothes for a TD.

I think that t-shirts and jumpers with slogans (political or advertising) should be banned though of course where warranted the rule could be disobeyed.

Liked by 1 person

WorldbyStorm - March 24, 2017

Yep. +1

BTW, apologies there was a comment you left last week on a post that I meant to get back to you about identity politics. I agree that it can be difficult for some older people to see change, but then again they’re not as we know a homogenous mass. And as you say the Daily Mail etc doesn’t help.

Like

dublinstreams - March 24, 2017

“I think that t-shirts and jumpers with slogans (political or advertising) should be banned though of course where warranted the rule could be disobeyed.” This is what it might end up as, not caps etc. Oireachtas TV trying not to show them is ridiculous though.

Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: