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Anti-worker April 7, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Meant to link to this previously. Note the class(es) most likely to suffer as automation continues:

A report by the consultancy firm PwC found that 30% of jobs in Britain were potentially under threat from breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI). In some sectors half the jobs could go.

And:

PwC said 2.25 million jobs were at high risk in wholesale and retailing – the sector that employs most people in the UK – and 1.2 million were under threat in manufacturing, 1.1 million in administrative and support services and 950,000 in transport and storage.

The report said the biggest impact would be on workers who had left school with GCSEs or lower, and that there was an argument for government intervention in education, lifelong learning and job matching to ensure the potential gains from automation were not concentrated in too few hands. Some form of universal basic income might also be considered.

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Comments»

1. EWI - April 7, 2017

I await contrition from those who’ve poo-poohed this notion in previous threads on this site.

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2. CL - April 7, 2017

Increasing productivity due to technological change and the displacement of workers has been around since the onset of the industrial revolution. So far there is no empirical evidence that technological change results in an increase in the general unemployment rate. This is confirmed by the article referenced.

John Hawksworth, PwC’s chief economist, said,

– “that the UK employment rate of just under 75% was at its highest level since modern records began in 1971, suggesting that advances in digital and other labour-saving technologies had been accompanied by job creation. He said it was not clear that the future would be different from the past in terms of how automation would affect overall employment rates.”

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3. j - April 7, 2017

“So far there is no empirical evidence that technological change results in an increase in the general unemployment rate. ” not in the long run. But two factors. One people used to work 6 days and indeed 51/2 until quite recently. And secondly, displacement to another location, out of date skills, no more coal in mine etc. factors.We need the modern equivalent of the 8 hour day campaign. A three day week, and this is only feasible on at least an European scale.

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WorldbyStorm - April 7, 2017

That’s a great point j.

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