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What you want to say – 26th April, Week 17, 2017 April 26, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. Alibaba - April 26, 2017

I am quite irritated by what’s happening with the relocation of the national maternity home to St. Vincent’s and its ownership by a religious order. I don’t believe the media is telling us what’s really going on here. But I’m seriously impressed by the protest actions of abuse survivors to block developments and it looks like they will keep it on the boil.

And what does the Left have to say? Cllr Eilis Ryan mentioned compulsory purchase of the site on the VB programme last week. The Labour Party conference had a resolution calling for it. But, and here’s the rub, never mind the site, what about the fact that the enterprise (Sisters of Charity: main shareholders of SVHG) that will own the institution, can determine what can be done inside it?

An array of assurances is given to say that religion will not be allowed to influence any medical procedures on the site, that there will be“clinical and operational independence” and all “in accordance with the law”. Tell that to Bishop Doran who warned already that the Catholic ethos has to be respected in any organisation owned by the church. So, supposing new legislation comes in to make provision for abortion, I suspect an Ethics Committee will make it known that abortion and maybe other procedures cannot be performed in the new maternity unit.

Who will get the proceeds of the sale of the original prime location site? What about the governance arrangements of the new one? Details of the deal should have been made available to all. Now, following kicking and screaming, the agreement has been released to the public. It says SVHG will retain a “corporate unitary oversight of all campus utilities and services”, whatever that means. Four of the nine directors will be from the Catholic Church.
 
But what about the money religious orders have failed to pay back in redress schemes? Left deputies have condemned the poor treatment of the survivors of institutional abuse. But nobody drills down to the details. I have even heard it suggested that there are no written agreements with the Church. Is that so? And what about the issue of patronage given that the Church’s tentacles of control are everywhere?

Fintan O’Toole made some valid points:

“The point of the ownership arrangement he [Harris] agreed to was that a key piece of public infrastructure, paid for by taxpayers, would remain a charitable institution. Not for nothing do the nuns involved have Charity in their title. …The difference between having rights and receiving charity is accountability. Charity is unaccountable”

http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/fintan-o-toole-church-control-of-hospitals-maintains-myth-of-charity-1.3059489?__vfz=c_pages%3D11000002678751

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irishelectionliterature - April 26, 2017

The whole thing stinks. I just cannot see how it can remain Independent. Under the current Papacy, the church has mellowed ever so slightly , however another swing back to the right and I’d have no doubt that there would be elements wanting the Church to assert their control.
I wonder how much of Dr Rhona Mahonys attitude towards this is framed by the prospect of further delays in building the new facility.

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Alibaba - April 27, 2017

Dr Peter Boylan resigns from the Board of the National Maternity Hospital and tells us why:

“It’s been said that the nuns are not going to run the hospital – that’s absolutely correct. I’ve never suggested that they would run the hospital, but they own the hospital, the own the company that runs it and they have undue representation on the board.”

Yep, ownership is the key issue.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/boylan-resigns-i-can-t-remain-a-member-of-a-board-so-blind-to-consequences-1.3063287

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2. irishelectionliterature - April 26, 2017

I see Terence Flanagan is back in the Fine Gael fold … much to the disgust of some of the local membership.

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3. Liberius - April 26, 2017

“The recommendations show there is a clear appetite for reform and change of the current situation regarding access to terminations. Sinn Féin’s position is clear. We want repeal and enact; repeal the eighth and enact legislation on the grounds of rape, incest, and fatal foetal abnormality.”

I take it then that SF won’t be supporting the decision for no restrictions up to 12 weeks?

http://www.sinnfein.ie/contents/44327

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Aengus Millen - April 26, 2017

Yeah there’s a real feeling that the parties have been hoisted by their own petard. FG and FF set this up to avoid responsibility but now the citizen’s assembly has thrown this back at them and with much more liberal circumstances then they expected.

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4. Jolly Red Giant - April 26, 2017

I will again express my surprise that there hasn’t been more comment here on the Jobstown trial –

Updates from the trial can be found here –

https://jobstowntrial.wordpress.com

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GW - April 26, 2017

Useful site.

Sub judice is always a concern as I think someone else has noted. I’m not up to speed with what can and can’t be said without prejudicing the case.

I think people here were pretty clear before on their attitude before the trial started.

Perhaps someone with better legal knowledge can provide advice.

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ar scáth a chéile - April 26, 2017

Not a criminal law expert but reckon when it’s s a jury trial always better to err on side of caution – only reporting what is said. After the verdict we can opine away -even if it goes to Court of Appeal —I think the thrust of the jurisprudence is that judges are far less likely to be swayed by commentary than jurors .

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CL - April 26, 2017

“The court heard that Burton would be the first witness and is due to give evidence tomorrow”
http://www.thejournal.ie/jobstown-trial-3-3359857-Apr2017/

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ar scáth a chéile - April 28, 2017

But there can’t be any impediment to commenting on how the trial is being reported in the media, which so far has given way more time to the State’s evidence than to the cross examination, thereby excluding the political context

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irishelectionliterature - April 26, 2017

To be honest as the trial is on at the minute I’d be wary of posting about it. There will be plenty after the trial.

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Jolly Red Giant - April 26, 2017

There has been widespread commentary on social media and other Internet forums about the trial – including analysis of the role of the judiciary and the Gardai in this case.

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WorldbyStorm - April 26, 2017

JRG, you’ve been welcome to post your comments. No one denies the importance of this issue, but different forums will focus on different issues – for example, for some of us I suspect there’s a belief, I certainly hold it, that others are better positioned to discuss it than I would be. And I don’t particularly feel I have anything much to add to those who are better positioned on it other than expressing my solidarity which I and others have done.

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RosencrantzisDead - April 27, 2017

There has been widespread commentary on social media and other Internet forums about the trial – including analysis of the role of the judiciary and the Gardai in this case.

“It can’t be against the law because my mate on facebook said so.”

Really?

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Paddy Healy - April 28, 2017

I think it would be a good show of solidarity for supporters including TDs and Councillors to attend the court at least once each week to show solidarity .

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5. Occasional lurker - April 26, 2017

Any chance we could figure out the history of drugs in Ireland.

A friend from abroad asked so did your parents see much drugs when they were young.

After picking my jaw of the ground I said no bar drink but the idea that rural Ireland in the 60s had drugs was almost surreal where as her country certainly did.

I know by the 80s there obviously the heroin epidemic but does anyone have a sense of what the history of drugs were in Ireland

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sonofstan - April 26, 2017

TCD was reputed to be a source of potent LSD, manufactured under laboratory conditions in the mid-sixties – before it was illegal. Certainly quite a few people I know, now heading for pension age, will get a bit misty eyed at the mention of it.

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CL - April 26, 2017

“Raifiu Ojikuto, a 26-year-old Nigerian medical student living at Pembroke Cottages, Ballsbridge was arrested in April 1964 for possession of Purple Hearts (amphetamine stimulant tablets) becoming the first person in state history to be arrested on drugs charges. He was found dead in his home by gardaí after he failed to appear in the Dublin District Court. His death was not treated as suspicious.”
http://www.thejournal.ie/readme/drugs-1960s-dublin-716243-Dec2012/

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Pasionario - April 27, 2017

A friend of mine once explained the heroin epidemic as a double consequence of container shipping.

On the one hand, containers eliminated a lot of casual dock work that had sustained the Inner City.

On the other, they made it easy to smuggle in drugs.

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Occasional lurker - April 27, 2017

Thanks all.

The container point is very well made.

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fergal - April 27, 2017

Going back further still wasn’t James Clarence Mangan a laudanum addict?- so opium was around in the mid 19th century…

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Occasional lurker - April 28, 2017

That’s a fascinating point. Laudanum is an opiate right?

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CL - April 28, 2017

“Ether drinking spread rapidly throughout Ireland, particularly in the North, and the substance soon could be purchased from grocers, druggists, publicans, and even traveling salesmen. Because ether was produced in bulk for certain industrial uses, it could also be obtained quite inexpensively. Its low price and rapid action meant than even the poorest could afford to get drunk several times a day on it. By the 1880s ether, distilled in England or Scotland, was being imported and widely distributed to even the smallest villages”
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-compass-pleasure/201106/the-irish-ether-drinking-craze-0

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Occasional lurker - April 28, 2017

They really should teach this stuff in history since the abject misery of the people would be an instruction

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Jim Monaghan - April 27, 2017

I am 69. UCD 1966 to 70. Drugs rare. Cannabis around but a minority thing. One of my engineering class died. Metadone powdered for intake and a clot? Ithink. On other eventually got off it. Life fairly destroyed.
Cannabis fairly common in early 70s. Caveat. I am fairly conservative about drugs and not very observant.

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6. sonofstan - April 26, 2017

The Labour Party thinks I’ve a reading age of 10

Dear S—-,

Today at PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn raised the concerns of people struggling under this Tory Government.

Meanwhile Theresa May dodged these questions. She failed to tell us:

What can Christopher and his husband do to see a real economy that is fair for all?

How can Andy’s grown-up, employed children afford to move out?

What should Laura do as she teaches a class with fewer and fewer resources?

What will Maureen and other women do now their pension age has been pushed back?

How can Sybil, 88 years old, be reassured that it is safe to go into hospital?

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GW - April 26, 2017

Awful. And their decision to support Brexit on explicitly anti-immigration grounds.

Argh – bloody Brexit again. And again. Ad infinitum.

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7. ar scáth a chéile - April 26, 2017

Speaking of surprise at lack of commentary on an issue(JRG re Jobstown trial above) there ‘s a deafening silence here on Venezuela . I know the manifest failings of the Bolivarian project and its inability to break free of oil dependence are profoundly dispiriting for its left sympathisers across the world but the corporate media coverage is appallingly biased . You’d never know that the protests are seeking to overthrow a democraticly elected government instead of waiting for the elections in 2018. For a different view on the nature of the protests: https://venezuelanalysis.com/

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ar scáth a chéile - April 26, 2017

This should be a direct link to the article I was referring to:
https://venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/13070

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WorldbyStorm - April 26, 2017

I think the fact we haven’t mentioned it is just due to there being so much else and again the feeling others can cover it better. I wouldn’t pretend to be expert on Venezuela, whereas I think I can write with a degree of knowledge about the border, or the EU (in Democratic Left I was on the international committee and had the painful task of reading EC/EC docs, particularly on security and military matters) or to an extent the BLP. But that’s not to say that mention of these issues by those who know more, like JRG re Jobstown or you on Venezuela isn’t really welcome.

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ar scáth a chéile - April 27, 2017

you can’t cover everything and didn’t mean it as a criticism just noting the relative lack of discussion (rather than deafening silence – a rhetorical flourish )

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ar scáth a chéile - April 27, 2017

And might I add,never mind running this parish and having to comment on commmets about lack of comments, serving on a left wing committee analysing EU directives has to be one of life’s harder stations – respect, comrade.

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WorldbyStorm - April 27, 2017

And likewise, my comment isn’t meant as a criticism either. I do worry that in some ways it does make sites like this too focused on certain things at the exclusion of others but… and here’s a thought, if people want to post up on specific topics they’re very welcome to, even short ones, or informational ones about events – the only caveat being the usual ones about legal stuff which I can’t see applying in any of these instances (or being easily dealt with by certain wordings).

Hahah, yeah, re DL I had to leave them eventually (though in truth not really over that, more over real problems with their attitude to the cessations by PIRA etc as well as a sense of them getting far too cosy with FG in opposition etc).

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8. ar scáth a chéile - April 27, 2017
9. Tomboktu - April 27, 2017

Just remembering that in 1983 Young Fine Gael campaigned against the Eighth Amendment. It would be interesting to see their literature and to find out where those campaigners are now.

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10. Gerryboy - April 27, 2017

80 years since Pablo Picasso began to paint Guernica. Le Monde reports the story of how, reacting to the fascist air bombing of the Basque town of Guernica in April 1937, Picasso ‘feverishly’ began painting his acclaimed symbolical giant canvas in his Paris studio.

http://www.lemonde.fr/m-moyen-format/article/2017/04/26/il-y-a-80-ans-picasso-peignait-fievreusement-guernica-sous-les-toits-de-paris_5117579_4497271.html

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11. Alibaba - April 27, 2017

I am puzzled by the reference to ‘effective repeal’ of the Eighth Amendment:

‘As someone who has campaigned for outright repeal, I was initially disappointed on Saturday to see the assembly recommend that the amendment should not be repealed, but rather replaced with a constitutional provision that explicitly authorises the Oireachtas “to legislate to address termination of pregnancy, any rights of the unborn and any rights of the pregnant woman”. …

The assembly has given clear guidance on the necessary framework for the abortion legislation to be introduced following effective repeal of the Eighth Amendment’.

Didn’t we take the view that the Constitution was no place for any mention of women’s reproductive rights? It’s as if through an act of volition, Ivana can deem us to have achieved the prospect for repeal. Yet this is the polar opposite of what the Citizens’ Assembly has actually recommended. Idiot me. I don’t get it.

http://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/ivana-bacik-constitution-change-risks-unforeseen-consequences-1.3062450

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irishelectionliterature - April 28, 2017

Now we will have to see wording, but it appears that the proposal is that the 8th is to be replaced with wording to say that the Oireachtas shall legislate on the issue.
In the meantime I presume an Oireachtas committee will come up with potential legislation to be in place should this amendment pass.
It’s not repeal but it’s the closest thing to it.

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Alibaba - April 28, 2017

Perhaps you’re right. But the point I wish to make is this: leaving it in the Constitution is a setback and there’s no getting away from that.

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irishelectionliterature - April 28, 2017

I agree, but I thought the 8th amendment was to be removed and replaced with something asking for the Oireachtas to legislate. Or is it that the 8th would remain in place until the Oireachtas Legislated?

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6to5against - April 28, 2017

they can hardly legislate against what would still be in the constitution? I think the proposal was to place the specific rules relating to abortion directly into the constitution. Which seems like a crazy idea to me, and I didn’t see a reasoning behind it.

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irishelectionliterature - April 28, 2017

Sure we’d be in the same bind again if that was the case with all sorts ending up in the Courts.

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12. CL - April 27, 2017
13. GW - April 28, 2017

Rumours that the EU will allow automatic entry of the north of Irleand into the EU if there is unification after #borkit.

Cat meet pigeons.

I’m slightly surprised at how hard the EU is taking the fight to the Brexiteers.

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WorldbyStorm - April 28, 2017

I think the stakes are high but they know they’re in a good position. It really is striking how the British appear unable to fully comprehend that they’re leaving with all that entails. There’s some entitlement culture there.

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GW - April 28, 2017

If the rumours are true it’s a significant boost for SFs brexit strategy.

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14. Paddy Healy - April 28, 2017

Man facing trial on €3 Creme Egg theft charge
But NO BANK CHIEF EVEN QUESTIONED BY GARDAI on 500 milion Euro Tracker Fraud by 15 Banks despite Demand By
Seamus Healy TD Full Dáil Record http://wp.me/pKzXa-qa
The accused denies stealing the box of crème eggs worth 3Euro from Lidl on Moore St, a Dulin city centre super-market.
Irish Independent April 28 2017 6:35 AM
A judge has expressed surprise at the prosecution and trial of a man over the alleged theft of Cadbury Creme Eggs.
Judge Anthony Halpin said “you couldn’t make it up” when the case came before him at Dublin District Court.

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15. Joe - April 28, 2017
irishelectionliterature - April 28, 2017

Would love to see his columns for that Workers Revolutionary Party paper.

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16. roddy - April 28, 2017

Joe did you not know that all the Irish players have been “our kind of guys” for decades.You only have to look at the “playlist” on the team bus .(Although I seem to recall yourself or someone of your political outlook lamenting “why do the provos have all the best songs”!)

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Joe - April 28, 2017

I guess your kind of guys ain’t my kind of guys, Roddy. Here’s a song about my guy.

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17. roddy - April 28, 2017

But you said Chris Hughton was”our kind of guy”.Did he jump off the bus when the rest of the team belted out “Sean south” and similar ditties.?

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Joe - April 28, 2017

Nah. He just whispered under his breath ‘C’mon the sergeant’ when the rest of them got to ‘But a sergeant foiled their daring plan’.

C’mere. A thought. If and when Brexit comes into force, will that mean you’ll be blocked from posting on here? A sort of Section 38 for the times we’re in?

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18. roddy - April 28, 2017

What’s section 38? Is it section 31plus inflation?

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Joe - April 28, 2017

🙂

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19. Paddy Healy - April 29, 2017

THIRD ATTEMPT AT TRACKER FRAUD By BANK OF IRELAND-BUT NO GARDA ACTION!
http://wp.me/pKzXa-qa
THIRD ATTEMPT AT TRACKER FRAUD By BANK OF IRELAND LAST JANUARY was “just an error”-Central Bank Accepts
Charlie Weston, IRISH INDEPENDENT:”The Bank of Ireland has twice in the past been accused of using “dirty tricks” to get people to give up their valuable trackers.Now it has emerged that the bank has had to apologise again to tracker customers for sending a letter with details about how to switch to more expensive fixed rates. Trackers are so cheap that moving to a variable or fixed rate could mean monthly repayments would be up to €500 more for a typical mortgage.Head of mortgages at Bank of Ireland John O’Beirne wrote to thousands of tracker customers stating that a letter issued to them in January was sent out in error.However, the letter clarifying the mix-up was only sent out last week.”

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20. Paddy Healy - April 30, 2017

Don’t Forget May Day March To-morrow Monday 2 pm Parnell Square
Dublin Council of Trade Unions -National Housing and Homelessness Coalition
Demand Formal Declaration of A HOUSING EMERGENCY ON MAY DAY MARCH TO-morrow Simon Community Calls For EMERGENCY HOUSING LEGISLATION-SEAMUS HEALY TD WAS RIGHT TO PROPOSE SUCH LEGISLATION Which Was Defeated in Dáil Dail Record http://wp.me/pKzXa-wc
“There are 198,000 vacant dwellings in the country, excluding holiday homes. In its report, the charity points out that the Constitution guarantees the rights of property owners but these can be limited by the State for the common good, and that the State has the power to introduce emergency legislation”-RTE. Seamus Healy’s Amendment To Formally Declare a HOUSING EMERGENCY DEFEATED in Dáil. Labour Vote Against But Fianna Fáil ABSTAIN! VOTING DETAILS The Dáil divided: Tá, 34; Staon(Formal Abstention), 24; Níl, 59. (Nil) Against : LABOUR PARTY, INDEPENDENT ALLIANCE (Including Finian McGrath), Green Party, Rural Independent Michael Fitmaurice, Indepenent Michael Lowry, Fine Gael Party Tá(For) : Independent Seamus Healy,Rural Independent Michael Collins, Sinn Féin,AAA, PBP,Independents 4 Change, Social Democrats, Formal Abstention, Fianna Fail Party Missing : Rural Independent Mattie McGrath,Independent Dr Harty, D Healy Rae, M Healy Rae, John Halligan (Independent alliance),Some FF and FG Deputies also missing

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21. ewolc - April 30, 2017

ATTAC are holding a reading and discussion group on Richard Murphy’s “Dirty Secrets” on Wednesday at 8 in Comhlamh
https://www.facebook.com/events/190855231434575/

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22. roddy - May 2, 2017

SF just pulled a master stroke- standing John Finucane ,son of Pat against Dodds in North Belfast!

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23. CL - May 2, 2017

House of Commons report on Brexit and energy.

“51. The free trade of energy across the island of Ireland and efficient use of interconnection with Great Britain are of critical importance to Northern Ireland, which is reliant on imports from the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain for gas and power supply. Any disruption to the development of and trading within the Single Energy Market of the island of Ireland (SEM), and the ongoing implementation of the
Integrated Single Energy Market (I-SEM) project, may have serious implications for consumers across the island of Ireland.”
https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmselect/cmbeis/909/909.pdf

“The Republic imports most of its energy – in 2015 we had an import dependency of 88 per cent – and the UK is the source of much of this energy. …
A crucial dimension of the close energy links we have is the Single Electricity Market for the island of Ireland…
We are further developing this market into the Integrated Single Electricity Market (I-SEM).”-Denis Naughten TD
http://www.irishnews.com/news/2017/02/06/news/denis-naughten-energy-links-a-brexit-priority-920144/

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