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What we are reading and the CLR Book Club – Week 18 May 2, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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1. yourcousin - May 2, 2017

Just finished the Pulitzer Prize winning biography on George Kennan. Interesting.

https://books.google.com/books?id=fMJcuAAACAAJ&dq=kennan+biography&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj7oLPp39HTAhWk7IMKHdKZCOMQ6AEIIjAB

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2. alanmyler - May 3, 2017

I finished up Zola’s Germinal last week and I’d be tempted to read more of his 20-book saga as a result. This week I’m reading Steinbeck’s East of Eden. About half way through it at the moment and I’m not quite sure whether it’s doing it for me. But maybe that’s largely just because I’m not used to reading fiction, I don’t know what to expect. Although I have this nagging doubt in the back of my head that literature might be like TV drama, and after watching Breaking Bad or The Wire it’s just hard to find other series that live up to those high standards, and likewise with fiction books? Perhaps it just requires immersion for long enough to become calibrated, and thereafter all the magic will flow.

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Gerryboy - May 6, 2017

Steinbeck didn’t identify himself with left wing causes, indeed was conservative on some key issues of the day, but he had narrative skills and created credible characters. The Grapes of Wrath about migrant downtrodden farm folk is his classic. For shorter reads try Sweet Thursday, Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row, which are about the off-beat marine biologist Doc and assorted, colourful neer-do-well people around his neighbourhood. His novella, The Pearl, is a moral fable set in Mexico, about a fisherman who finds a rare pearl in an oyster and is subsequently hunted through desert mountains by gangsters. Hemingway wrote that fine novel about the Spanish Civil War, For whom the Bell tolls, and penned half a dozen stories about people living in hardship circumstances; but for me Hemingway’s non emotional blank prose lacks an empathy for the common people that is so obvious in Steinbeck.

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3. Starkadder - May 5, 2017

The fascinating “Spain: A History” , edited by Raymond Carr.

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