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The Iron Nightmare: The Businessperson as Politician… May 4, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Does Trump’s election perhaps, just perhaps, plunge a wooden stake into the heart of a trope that has had far too much currency across the last number of decades, the idea of the businessperson as politician, able to come in bringing with them much-vaunted private sector efficiency, directness of command and control, a near authoritarian ability to implement their will.

For Trump has demonstrated, if nothing else, in his first 100 days just how complex it can be to administer in the present era. That government itself is, rightly, constrained by checks and balances. These may be weak, partial and inadequate but they do exist. His writ is not absolute, his whims are not addressed without question. And worse again, from a certain point of view, the means of pushing back against his decisions are actually quite robust.

Moreover the lack of preparedness indicated by the approaches taken by his administration so far have been clearly indicative of the complexity of socio-economic and political issues and how often they are unamenable to simple or simplistic so-called ‘solutions’. Keep in mind his continual complaints about how difficult, how little he expected matters to be problematic, and so on and so forth.

Of course it is early days, but the sheer chaos of the Trump administration points not to the efficiency of that which he brings to the table but its opposite, his inability and that of his lieutenants even to shape fit for purpose policy approaches.

There’s talk that all this chaos is providing a problem to the far right further afield, that where the initial response of Le Pen etc was to make common cause with Trump now given the cack-handed manner in which – for example, the anti-immigration measures were implemented, there’s a tendency to start backing away from him and his administration. If true that is heartening news – it is entirely plausible that his failures may well reflect upon right populist and far-right aspirants elsewhere. And they must reflect upon the fact that Trump isn’t going anywhere for four years.

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1. CL - May 4, 2017

The Republican replacement of Obamacare has passed in the House,-barely. .

“The heart of the bill is the same one that was polling at under 20 percent and failed two months ago: a near-trillion dollar tax cut for wealthy investors, financed by cuts to insurance subsidies for the poor and middle class”
http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/05/trumpcare-an-abdication-of-responsibility-a-moral-disgrace.html

To become law the bill will have to pass in the Senate. But that won’t stop the White House celebrating.

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GW - May 4, 2017

One trillion? $10^12?

Per annum? That’s a massive transfer from rich to poor. $3k per US citizen if I’m not mistaken.

Can those figures be correct?

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CL - May 5, 2017

These figures are not for a year. Here’s a projection for 10 years and gives a saving for the rich of $600 billion.
https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/3/7/14844362/ahca-ryancare-trumpcare-tax-cut-rich

and 24 million people will lose health insurance.

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CL - May 5, 2017

Jonathan Chait who cites the trillion figure in tax cuts has written a recently published book on Obama.
http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/i_have_to_ask/2017/05/jonathan_chait_on_his_new_book_audacity_and_the_democratic_party_s_future.html

Conservatives also cite the trillion figure, but see it of course as a good thing.
“Not only is the vote a win for health care reform; it is also a win for tax reform. The repeal of the taxes that supported the Affordable Care Act will save Americans one trillion dollars over the coming decade.”
http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2017/05/04/health-care-bill-passes-in-house-trump-and-gop-finally-come-together.html

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CL - May 5, 2017

Another factor is that the Congressional Budget Office(CBO) has yet to score the current version of the bill. So the above figures are presumably based on the CBO’s estimates for the previous version.
“Nobody is certain how the CBO will score this measure, which means that the implications of the legislation remain unclear….
Republicans are chomping at the bit for this President to send them legislation that will dismantle the welfare state, strip free markets of regulations and cut taxes”
http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/04/opinions/republican-trump-healthcare-victory-opinion-zelizer/index.html

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2. Starkadder - May 4, 2017

“the idea of the businessperson as politician, able to come in bringing with them much-vaunted private sector efficiency, directness of command and control, a near authoritarian ability to implement their will.”

For many years, I’ve seen comments from right-wing Irish people saying “MICHAEL O’LEARY FOR TAOISEACH!” These are usually the same Irish people who complain about “mass immigration”, “trannies” and “secularists”- maybe they envisioned MOL as a kind of Irish Trump.

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3. GW - May 4, 2017

Was Trump ever the deal-maker he claimed to be?

He inherited his money from his Mafia-partner father and then was a serial bankrupt that managed to talk people into lending him more money.

He’s a con-man who’s made it big, rather than anyone who’s ever managed anything complex.

Now he’s building favours by stealing from the poor to give to the rich.

But Trump in practice has, I would cautiously say, contributed to taking the steam out of the fascist-spectrum right in Europe by showing what it is like in government.

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