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Special status for NI June 21, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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No deal, or so it would seem this morning, in relation to the DUP and the Tories. Though functionally no deal is actually equivalent to a deal given the DUP are loath to give one J. Corbyn any path at all to Downing Street. Anyhow, a minority government in the UK as of now.

Meanwhile…

… from the Guardian…

The Democratic Unionists are seeking to make the new government’s policies “more compassionate” across the UK, party sources said today.

They said the DUP was attempting to dilute austerity measures and defend things like the triple lock on pensions in its negotiations with the Conservatives.

The DUP was a unionist party and wanted to secure a deal that not only could benefit Northern Ireland but also people in England, Scotland and Wales, they said.

Among the issues the DUP were raising that were Northern Ireland-specific was a special corporation tax status for the region, possibly at a 12.5% rate. This is similar to the Irish Republic’s tax regime which has successfully attracted foreign direct investment to Ireland.

Doesn’t a different corporation tax rate in the North per se indicate a special status for it? It’d be useful to know what they consider to be the yardsticks by which the term ‘special status’ is applied.

 

 

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Comments»

1. Joe - June 21, 2017

Probably not the right thread but this alarming headline is in today’s online Indo: “Northern farmers buying up land in Republic due to Brexit”.

Roddy, could you check if these ‘Northern farmers’ are from your neighbours, the 15% minority? This could be the start of a reverse takeover.

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2. simonjkyte - June 21, 2017

interesting. not what damian green is saying though?

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WorldbyStorm - June 21, 2017

If you asked me to put money on it I would just, just, barely say they will deal. But it could go either way and both have advantages in not having an actual deal.

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simonjkyte - June 21, 2017

I think they may not actually

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WorldbyStorm - June 21, 2017

Interesting – what’s your read on it?

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3. Damon Matthew Wise Âû - June 21, 2017

It makes sense for NI to have a middle tax regime between GB and RoI, as it is a special situation under an EU and UN recognised treaty called the Good Friday Agreement.

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4. roddy - June 21, 2017

Joe,as we’re 40 miles from the Donegal border,I can’t see them driving over Glenshane every day to tend cattle! That 15% by the way is highly accurate by the way,lest you think I pulled it out of the air.We tally the votes of all parties at the count up here too!

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Joe - June 21, 2017

Wouldn’t doubt your figures for one minute Roddy. They could buy up the farms though and maybe have an arrangement with their cousins in east Donegal to look after the stock and so on.
I like the idea of a reverse takeover. It could be the way to go.

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5. roddy - June 21, 2017

The ammount of people in farming now is miniscule.Of the 2000 people on my local electoral roll(a village and its hinterland) ,there would not be 10 full time farmers.

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