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Workers rights… July 18, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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It really is a sign of the times when in the Taylor Report (see here) in the UK on working conditions in the ‘gig economy’ has a suggestion that at times previously would have been seen as a given… that is higher rates for overtime. In the Taylor report this is dressed up as ‘higher minim wages’ for ‘non-guaranteed hours’. Have we fallen this far?

The report itself seems to fall far too short of the broader issues that all this raises… or as the guardian puts it ‘he has not blown away the uncertainties of a working life spent in the gig economy whose workers now number about 1.1 million’. The Guardian also notes the absurdity in some of the language…

[Taylor] has disappointed trade unions by not demanding full employment rights for people who work for companies such as Uber and Deliveroo. Instead, he has argued for the innovation and flexibility that both zero-hours and gig economy work, at their best, can enable. Exhausted warehouse workers on zero-hours terms may raise their eyebrows at that.

Owen Jones has a piece on it too which is equally critical.

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1. bjg - July 18, 2017

Sean O’Grady in the Indie on how the UK can survive the hard Brexit he thinks is inevitable:

Liberalise labour laws

For the economy to compete in a tougher economic climate, the labour force has to become even more flexible. Thus, the fantasy that we can become richer and pay ourselves more than we earn simply by passing laws and setting the so-called “living wage” ever higher has to be abandoned. All this is a tax on business and tax on jobs. With a living wage at £10 plus per hour and no immigration we’d hardly have a hotel or restaurant in Britain left open after 2019. We need to get real about that. Union power in the public sector particularly needs to be rebalanced, and we cannot countenance co-management of enterprises via worker directors and the like. The UK needs to be a place where companies and public sector bodies can hire the right people for the right jobs at the right rates; and streamline redundant operations as needed.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-david-davis-free-trade-migration-labour-laws-low-taxes-a7845421.html

And RIchard North on agriculture after Brexit day:

http://www.eureferendum.com/blogview.aspx?blogno=86542

bjg

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WorldbyStorm - July 18, 2017

Jesus Christ. That’s some quote.

The North piece is sobering.

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bjg - July 18, 2017

I don’t know what weight Sean O’Grady’s opinions carry, but they seem to fit in with one strand behind Brexit, a strand represented too by shrink-the-state austerians [Rick writes about the effects today https://flipchartfairytales.wordpress.com/2017/07/18/an-honest-debate-about-austerity-and-tax/%5D and these people https://redtapeinitiative.org.uk, about whom Private Eye had a short piece in its most recent issue.

In a context in which

The removal of the effect of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights substantively weakens the protection of rights in the UK: laws which violate Charter rights will no longer be set aside.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2017/07/17/legislation-that-is-and-is-not-the-deeply-problematic-repeal-bill/ it is not clear that Jeremy Corbyn’s pro-Brexit position can provide the protections that I am sure he would like to see.

bjg

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2. GW - July 18, 2017

Oh ye of little faith!

Of course a ‘workers Brexit’ is possible. Tory ministers’ fiat ‘Henry VIII’ decisions will be vastly superior to the ECHR in protecting workers’ and human rights.

Only close your eyes and believe! Purple unicorns dancing on rainbows.

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Joe - July 18, 2017

So has pro-Brexit jc and the LP given many details on how they will protect workers’ rights and pay and conditions etc post-Brexit?

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Citizen of Nowhere - July 18, 2017

This short clip clears up Labour’s position on Brexit once and for all:

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WorldbyStorm - July 18, 2017

That’s a good question. Though I presume they’d try to retain the good stuff from the EU. But they will have other problems. A point made today in the Gaurdian was that the deficit in terms of funding due to devaluation, increased costs of trading etc would radically cut into the financial capability of a future BLP government to pursue its programmes. That in essence it would be having to play catch up to fix up the mess the Tory Brexit was causing.

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3. Citizen of Nowhere - July 18, 2017

This is a job for … THE MASTER NEGOTIATOR!!!

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WorldbyStorm - July 18, 2017

🙂

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