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What you want to say – 16th August, 2017 August 16, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. panablogblog - August 16, 2017

Roger Casement became an international figure because of his opposition to slavery, which has a contemporary echo because of the conflict in the US over the statutes to the defenders of slavery in the US and the legalisation of slavery by ISIS. The dlr Roger Casement Summer School will be in the Lexicon from the 24-26 August 2017.
see Facebook: dlr Roger Casement Summer School or email: dlrrogercasementsummerschool@gmail.com

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2. Starkadder - August 16, 2017

Well, lookee here:


The Justice Department is demanding that the website-hosting company DreamHost turn over identifying information on visitors to a website used to organize protests during the president’s inauguration in January. The company, which is fighting the request in court, believes the search warrant is unconstitutionally broad and a threat to free speech. And digital privacy advocates warn that it could represent a McCarthyesque strategy for identifying political dissidents opposed to President Donald Trump and his administration.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/08/justice-department-accused-of-breaching-constitution-by-seeking-info-on-visitors-to-anti-trump-website/

It seems if they can’t “stand idly by” while white supremacists attack left-wing protests, then they can set Sessions & co. after them.

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Aonrud ⚘ - August 16, 2017

The best way to avoid invasive data requests like that is just not to record visitors IPs in the first place.

It’s interesting that they’re going after the host. I wouldn’t have thought Dreamhost should have that information anyway – presumably it’s some shared hosting setup where they have the server logs.

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Ahem - August 16, 2017

You don’t think visits to this site are not being tracked by WordPress and/or the Facebook widgets on it?

Naive, very.

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Ahem - August 16, 2017

And Dreamboat probably has Nginx logs up the whazoo.

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Aonrud ⚘ - August 16, 2017

My point is that there’s no technical reason to keep them, and if you use a VPS or run your own server, you can turn off IP logging – and I think that’s a good practice. Note I said I didn’t think Dreamhost should have that data.

And, yes, WordPress & Facebook have tracking bugs all over this and every other site, but this is why it’s basically unsafe to browse without a raft of blockers.

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3. Starkadder - August 17, 2017

An article in the Irish Times so stupid and insensitive I thought they’d actually re-hired Myers for a minute:


Trump and his supporters thrive on the venom of their liberal tormentors. The old maxim should apply: think what your enemy most wants you to do, and do the opposite. Tolerating Trump may stick in the craw, but it must be counter-productive to feed his paranoia, to behave exactly as his lieutenants want his critics to behave, like the liberal snobs that obsess him.

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/simon-jenkins-with-every-sneer-liberals-just-make-trump-stronger-1.3189506

I think saying white nationalists and their opponents are the same is something that has gone beyond toleration. And I love the implication that the only people objecting to Trump’s recent actions are “liberal snobs”.

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6to5against - August 21, 2017

Not supporting Jenkins, but I think he might be right in one aspect of his argument: that Trumps ideology – such as it is – is driven more by a hatred of the left than by any coherent thoughts of his own.

I think there might be something similar in play in a lot of middle aged / elderly right wingers. You mention Kevin Myers above, and I’m thinking too of other columnists like Eoghan Harris, John Waters, David Quinn. I’m not claiming to have read the entire ouevre of any of these but its hard to avoid much of their commentary, and I’ve often wondered what any of them might put forward as their central ideological belief, if challenged. Shouldn’t that be obvious to any of us who have read their writings over the years? But it really isn’t. They have had thousands of thousands of words in the national media that all amounts to ….nothing much.

The only consistent theme I can pick out of their writing, the constant thread, is a hatred of the perceived left.

I’m sure there is some interesting psychology in play with some of them. Perhaps an awareness of how easily they cast off what little belief they ever had in social justice has driven them to such anger. Or perhaps an inability to move on from the perceived values of their parents generation. Who knows. And ultimately, who cares.

But there has always been a cohort of the rich and powerful clever enough to give them newspaper columns and further their own agenda. Or, in the case of Trump, to jump into the backseat of his presidency and quickly destroy what little structure America offers to create social justice, while Trump drives around in a meaningless rage, destroying the core of political life.

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4. Starkadder - August 19, 2017

On this day in 1936, Federico Garcia Lorca was murdered by Spanish fascists:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federico_Garc%C3%ADa_Lorca

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5. Starkadder - August 20, 2017

Why is the US (and the world, to judge by the alarming number of Confederate flags in Cork?) have such a romantic view of the Confederacy? Andrew O’Hehir looks into it:

http://www.salon.com/2017/08/19/the-confederate-mystique-why-is-white-america-hooked-on-the-poisonous-mythology-of-a-criminal-regime/

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FergusD - August 21, 2017

There has been discussion on the WWW following Charlotteville about the claim of Confederate apologists that the Civil War was about state’s rights and not really about slavery as such. This seems to have even been the line taken by textbooks in the southern states in fairly recent times. It is debunked by an examination of the actual speeches made by those advocating secession.

https://qz.com/378533/for-the-last-time-the-american-civil-war-was-not-about-states-rights/

Although this debunks their claim they weren’t seceeding to keep slavery it doesn’t necessarily follow that Lincoln fought the war to abolish slavery, rather than primarily to preserve the Union. That is another argument I think.

Another thing – many of those Confederate monuments e.g. in Baltimore, went up after WW2! Really part of a campaign by racists:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/confederate-monuments-history-trump-baltimore_us_5995a3a6e4b0d0d2cc84c952

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6. GW - August 21, 2017

I remain a supporter of another referendum for British voters about Brexit when it becomes clear what a real-existing Brexit means – as opposed to the fictions of the last campaign, and the continuing delusions of hard Brexiteers and some Lexiteers.

But George Eaton here has a very good point when he notes:

The vote, as some Remainers note, would also come at the wrong moment. By 2018/19, the UK will, at best, have finalised its divorce terms. A new trade agreement with the EU will take far longer to conclude. Thus, the Brexiteers would be free to paint a false picture of the UK’s future relationship. “It would be another half-baked, ill-informed campaign,” a Labour MP told me.

So perhaps Labour could keep the large number of youthful remainers among it’s supporters on board by promising another referendum about re-entry when it becomes clear what the consequences of Brexit are for the British people.

He reports:

…an increasing number of Remainers are attracted to an alternative strategy. After a lengthy transition, they argue, voters should be offered a choice between a new EU trade deal and re-entry under Article 49 of the Lisbon Treaty. By the mid-2020s, Remainers calculate, the risks of Brexit will be clearer and the original referendum will be a distant memory.

And I don’t think there will be any appetite for forcing the UK into the Euro or Schengen.

The proviso, they add, is that the EU would have to allow the UK re-entry on its existing membership terms (rather than ending its opt-outs from the euro and the border-free Schengen Area).

Would such a motion get through the coming party conference, I wonder?

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7. roddy - August 21, 2017

I see Kate Hoey now using the ramblings of Thatcherite economist Patrick Minford to support her Brexit stance.

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WorldbyStorm - August 22, 2017

Well hoey is utterly discredited in my mind, as for Minford, absurd.

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