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Käthe Kollwitz: Life, Death, and War Exhibition NGI November 13, 2017

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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This has been strongly recommended by a commenter/contributor here…


6 September – 10 December 2017
Print Gallery | Free admission

An exhibition of 40 prints and drawings by the German artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) will, for the first time, be shown in the National Gallery of Ireland. It is an opportunity for visitors to discover this important artist who created almost 300 prints, around 20 sculptures and some 1450 drawings during her long career. The works in the exhibition, specially selected by the Gallery from the superb collection at the Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, will allow visitors to reflect on the effects of war, in particular the grief left in its wake. Kollwitz’s five print cycles: Revolt of the Weavers (1893-98), Peasant War (1902-08), War (1921-22), Proletariat (1924-25), and Death (1934-37) place her among the foremost printmakers of the twentieth century. The exhibition will be accompanied by a free illustrated brochure, and a programme of talks and music.

Curator: Anne Hodge, National Gallery of Ireland

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Comments»

1. pvnevin - November 13, 2017

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/03/06/sens-m06.html
Review of Manchester exhibition on war, including Kollwitz.

Liked by 1 person

2. Mick 2 - November 14, 2017

I strongly second this recommendation, for what it’s worth. It’s all pretty devastating, but one particular print titled ‘Brot!’ of two hungry children clinging out of their helpless mother sticks with me.

Liked by 1 person

3. GW - November 14, 2017

Good to see Kollwitz getting the attention she deserves outside Germany. For me her greatest work was her drawing and engraving.

She was a woman who lost a son in one world war, and a grandson in the next. Like so many. Not surprisingly the consequences of war, poverty and dictatorship became her themes.

There are some high quality digital scans of her work to be found here.

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