jump to navigation

An historic error… July 31, 2019

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
trackback

Ellie Mae O’Hagan of the Guardian made an intriguing point on the Guardian politics podcast the other day about the Johnson premiership and British Labour. Speaking as the token Corbynista – as she described herself, on the panel, she argued that Labour had made a significant error in relation to Remain sentiment. That was that it “assumed that the Remain movement is dominated by people like Alastair Campbell and Peter Mandelson, which it is at the top, but the Remain grassroots are people, particularly young people, who are frightened and horrified by what they see as a reactionary right-wing turn in this country, in terms of Boris Johnson himself (they see him as our Trump) and I think Labour because it has not really understood or engaged with the Remain movement they haven’t been talking to those people who are part of their coalition and part of their base.’

She may be right. And I’d agree that the BLP has taken a remarkably hard Brexit line – ruling out the CU and being rather rhetorical about the SM. How much of that is design rather than confusion or lack of knowledge is a different matter.

Comments»

1. Daire O'Criodain - July 31, 2019

Is “inconsistent, incoherent and irrelevant” more accurate than “hard” in relation to BLP line. I come from a different church to most on this website, while understanding and respecting (no patronisation implied or intended) the broad viewpoint and have no personal animus towards Corbyn. I grow vegetables and make jam myself! But if Jacob is the Minister for the 19th century, Jeremy is the Minister for the 1970s, and the world has moved on. Wherever the Left should be, that is no longer the place. He’s a political anachronism rather than a future that works.

Like

2. Daire O'Criodain - August 1, 2019

Does the silence indicate you all agree???? Wow!

Like

Joe - August 1, 2019

We all most certainly do not! Jez is the man. I remember the seventies. They were great. JezLabour will win in a landslide, he’ll abolish the internet, renationalize the railways, re-open the mines and Telegram Sam will be back at number one. Oh yeah, and Leeds United will win the league.

Like

Joe - August 1, 2019

Under Jez it will be better than the seventies. Infinitely better. I won’t be plagued by carbuncles, blackheads and spots. I’ll look so cool in my wranglers and I’ll win at least one fight.

Like

WorldbyStorm - August 1, 2019

It’s interesting Daire, I’ve very mixed feelings about the BLP leadership. I think McDonnell is a more interesting character and arguably one who could make a more persuasive case at a national level in the UK. That said it was essential that there was a change in order to shift to a more overtly leftwing position.

Like

Daire O'Criodain - August 1, 2019

Agree with that. And God knows, much as it pains me to say it, I’d prefer Corbyn to Johnson but that’s a low bar. While he did do tremendously well in the last election, I fear the conceit has entered Jeremy’s soul that he really won it (the proverbial moral victory) and that it was all or most of it down to him. On the plus side, he is a better campaigner than he is a leader and comes more into his own at elections. Johnson is in permanent sound byte campaign mode and may not be able to modulate so easily. He is showing either tremendous discipline or the “depth” of his limits by sticking very closely to a narrow script of boostery one liners on all issues.

Like

WorldbyStorm - August 1, 2019

It is true, Corbyn is a born campaigner. And that may stand to him. Something must. But I’ve felt that in a way he and some around him have wound up standing in opposition to not just their own supporters but their own membership and there have been just bizarre unforced errors on a range of topics that could have been entirely avoided. It’s not even that they’ve pursued a sort of Brexit line. In a way given the referendum they had little choice – but it has been that where they could have offered genuine leadership in regard of a Brexit that saw the UK have SM and CU participation in a real sense they shied away from that. On their economic platform I’d have liked a less statist approach to social and public ownership.

Like

Daire O'Criodain - August 1, 2019

Mud, Slade and the Bay City Rollers. Where are they now?

Liked by 1 person

Daire O'Criodain - August 2, 2019

WBS: We are in violent agreement on your last comment. This site must be infecting me! Its a good site and the posts are always thoughtful and thought provoking. Reasoned rather than reflexive. Keep it up.

Like

WorldbyStorm - August 2, 2019

That’s very sound of you to say so and much appreciated. But one thing that is great is the back and forth in comments a positive way over these issues like this exchange here. And by the way one other key thing is the recognition that we’re not all on the same page exactly and that that’s actually a good thing. I occasionally used to take a wander over to the Libertarian Alliance in the UK. Disagreed with a huge amount but… some of what they said about trying to work through non-statism is actually of interest and even use for people on the left who don’t think statism is the only way forward.

Like

3. Alibaba - August 3, 2019

It’s true that Labour members and especially the new members are overwhelmingly anti-Brexit, and Corbyn was and remains not so. He orchestrated Labour playing a weak pro-Remain hand during the referendum. Once Brexit won he called for it to be implemented immediately and struck me as determined to get a negotiated deal at whatever cost, short of a no-deal Brexit.

Talking about historic errors, look at the far left; deluded by the notion of a Left Brexit and giving it an anti-capitalist gloss. Curiously, they are very shy of arguing for this on the streets or in their literature. Of course, they do not pander to racism, so you won’t find them joining the real Brexiteers with their anti-immigrant slogans. Instead, they are rendered politically irrelevant and what’s more, they’ve weakened the left and strengthened the anti-Brexit nationalists, liberals and the Labour right wing.

Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: