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The world of work, the world of workers… a continuing series September 20, 2019

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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From the Guardian during the week the news comes that:

More than a million workers in Britain do not receive any of the holiday pay they are guaranteed by law, according to a report exposing the scale of violations in the UK jobs market.

Perhaps predictably these figures come while there is a rise in the numbers of those on zero-hours contracts and in temporary or agency employment. So ‘Workers in the gig economy are also not guaranteed employment rights such as sick and holiday pay, leading to disputes about their employment status’.

Again unsurprisingly:

Britain relies largely on individuals to hold non-compliant firms to account, with more than 100,000 applications made to the employment tribunal system last year alone.

This sort of ‘opt-in’ approach is completely loaded in the favour of employers rather than employees. Anyone who has had to go to a boss seeking a wage increase or time off or making even more innocuous queries will know that problem. And that’s before one gets to the following:

According to the research, almost one in 10 workers do not receive a legally required payslip, making it hard for them to calculate whether they are receiving the right level of pay, pension and holiday and to check for any deductions.

It is clear that some employments are effectively large scale scams functioning to the benefit of those who employ and functioning against those who are ‘employed’. The research shows people are underpaid, less than the minimum wage, that there are continuing labour market violations and that this in the face of precarious working conditions more broadly.

Welcome news therefore that a Corbyn government would introduce a Ministry of Employment and a Workers Protection Agency. But given Labour was in power from 1997 to 2010 the question must be asked why were these not introduced long before then?

And of course they’re only the tip of the iceberg in terms of pushing back. What about union recognition, worker representation within companies? And that should be only the start of a process of transforming workplaces?

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1. CL - September 20, 2019

“Welcome news therefore that a Corbyn government would introduce a Ministry of Employment and a Workers Protection Agency. But given Labour was in power from 1997 to 2010 the question must be asked why were these not introduced long before then?”
Because under the neoliberalism of Blair labour power and its recompense are regarded as a commodity regulated mainly by market forces.

“The California Senate passed a law last week requiring platforms such as Uber and Lyft to treat their drivers as employees. Efforts in legislatures and courts in other states and countries are under way to achieve the same result
In the UK, a report by Robert Skidelsky, commissioned by Labour’s shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, recommended a government job guarantee and a 35-hour week in the public sector as a lever for improving conditions in private sector employment….
It is probably safe to say at least one-quarter of the workforce is not in a traditional full-time and/or permanent job with an employer, and the proportion could be higher among younger age groups. The challenge is that so much government social policy — and so much collective organisation through unions — is delivered through the traditional “job”. Although it has been clear for more than 20 years that the social means of giving people enough economic security need to change, what we have had instead is states and businesses trying to pass the responsibility to each other — with individual workers caught in the middle….
Change will come: the world of work is not working for too many people. But it will not take the shape of a return to the past.”
https://www.ft.com/content/eca406c4-d880-11e9-9c26-419d783e10e8

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2. Hair Extensions - November 19, 2019

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The world of work, the world of workers… a continuing series | The Cedar Lounge Revolution

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