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What you want to say – 16 October 2019 October 16, 2019

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. lcox - October 16, 2019

“Voices of 1968 around the world: a reading”: next Tuesday 22nd @ 12, Maynooth.

The radical movements of the “long 1968” shook the postwar order from Prague to Paris, Derry to Mexico City, Rome to San Francisco. “Voices of 1968” (Pluto) lets those movements speak in their own words – posters, flyers, graffiti, manifestos, songs, underground texts and more. More about the book at https://www.plutobooks.com/9780745338088/voices-of-1968/

Co-editor Dr Laurence Cox will be reading from some of the texts in the book with a slideshow in the background – revolutions produce some cracking writers, speakers and graphic artists!

Iontas seminar room (2.31, top floor), Maynooth University (north end, beside the “water feature”).

https://www.facebook.com/events/nuim-iontas-building/the-voices-of-1968-around-the-world-a-reading/646538665836046/.

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2. Fergal - October 16, 2019

Looks like a deadly book… akways shocked at how expensive Pluto books are … even paperbacks…. around 25 euro I reckon… not much if you have it, an awful lot of money if you need it…

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WorldbyStorm - October 16, 2019

It looks like a great book, agreed, but there is the issue you point to. I do wonder sometimes how left thought is meant to proliferate if it is stuck behind such prices.

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lcox - October 17, 2019

No argument there – in Ireland at least the best recommendation is get a library to order it in and that way plenty other people can read it too. Pluto are now a social enterprise btw – I don’t have an inside track but sales of books like this are a fraction of what most things you’ll find in bookshops cost and there are obvious economies of scale. And even at that, Pluto (and other left publishers) want if possible to see books that can be set on university courses to be sure of some sales.

There is a real context to this – well over half a *million* titles are published in English alone each year. You won’t find this book in any bookshop I’ve come across, and it has yet to be reviewed in English. Events like this and online essays etc. are its only publicity other than the Pluto website and catalogue. None of that is unusual for books like this – in other words it is entirely possible to publish a book and *only* have copies bought by well-funded university libraries.

The situation is actually worse than it looks – we got uni funding for translations and found money to cover copyright costs for some items as well as enable a higher page count at the same price. So the “real” cost of the book would be more like 40 euro probably.

Other than libraries, part of the upside is that all 3 editors are involved in free, online journals (https://interfacejournal.net, http://www.viewpointmag.com and Slagmark which is in Danish) and anything *other* than books we write is also available free online (my academia.edu page for example). In other words, there is any amount of left thought not in book form out there free – and even magazines or independent writers on the left (where someone has to make a living by doing it) routinely make at least some of their work available free.

Or you can have party-linked etc. presses where the organisation keeps costs low by cross-subsidising or through donations. But there is a reason why most radical magazines have gone online over the past couple of decades – it is anything other than easy…

For 68 in particular, there is a *lot* of free material available online to – accessibility depending partly on your language skills (we translated from 9 languages) but also on what items you’re looking for: there are famous texts that are regularly reprinted and easy to find, others which are … not.

That’s a long-winded answer to a real problem. I don’t know any radical author who wouldn’t like to see their books available more cheaply, or free (or put another way I don’t know any radical author who makes a living from writing *books*).

Sorry for the long reply…

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lcox - October 17, 2019

What I should have said first : there is or was (haven’t checked recently) a 20 or 30% discount with code 1968.

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tafka - October 18, 2019

Yea – it does seem a bit steep – but they do offer a free e-book, and as far as I can make it’s DRM-free.

Says the person who’s e-book reader just died and is mourning… 😦

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3. Paddy Healy - October 17, 2019

Pensioners will be €168 worse off next year due to inflation. Siptu economist Michael Taft said pensioners would need an extra €168 a year added to their payments to keep pace with inflation. https://wp.me/pKzXa-1ma
Anne-Marie Walsh, Irish Independent, October 17 2019
Pensioners will be €168 a year worse off due to price hikes next year after failing to get another €5 in the Budget.
The Government’s forecasted increase in the cost of living would wipe €3.22 a week – or €168 a year – off the value of the full contributory pension in 2020. Inflation is set to jump from 0.9pc this year to 1.3pc next year, and 1.4pc in 2021, according to the Government’s Economic and Fiscal Statement released on Budget day. The pension would therefore have to rise by the same amount to keep up with predicted price rises.

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4. CL - October 18, 2019

“Hubble’s Photo of Interstellar Comet 2I/Borisov….

2I/Borisov has wandered into our Solar System from the deep cold of interstellar space, but nobody knows from whence it came, or how long it’s been travelling. Boris only the second object we’ve observed that’s come into our Solar System from somewhere else in the galaxy,”
https://www.universetoday.com/143755/heres-the-picture-weve-been-waiting-for-hubbles-photo-of-interstellar-comet-2i-borisov/

(Probably of no significance that its being called ‘Boris’ for short)

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5. Tomboktu - October 19, 2019

I’m not into sports, so there may be a well known and rational answer to this question:

Why is New Zealand allowed to perform a ritual containing threatening gestures before rugby internationals?

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Tomboktu - October 20, 2019

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Dr. X - October 21, 2019

Back before the old king died (i.e. 2008) I had a short-term gig in Aotearoa New Zealand.

What I learned there is that the Maori have a haka for every occasion. E.g. when some firefighters were killed in the line of duty, their funeral was televised on the state broadcaster. Their surviving comrades lined the road out of the fire station, as the funeral cortege set off for the cemetery.

And then, off to one side, there was a lone firefighter doing a very solemn, slow-motion haka.

As for the form it takes in the rugby. . . . well, if you look at then footage from the early 70s, it was done with an almost comic attitude. The rise of Maori pride led this comic angle to be abandoned, and led also to the rise of the haka in the form we now see.

Which is much closer to the ritual war dance which was, historically, it’s major form. Why allow this to go on? Well, international sport is war minus the shooting, after all. And I really don’t think anyone on the opposition team is going to be intimidated by it. Intimidated by the All Blacks win-at-all-costs obsessive mentality, maybe. But not the traditional haka.

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tafkaGW - October 21, 2019

I vaguely remember reading an anthropological explanation that the function of such displays of aggression before a conflict was to minimise the damage caused during a conflict. They are common and not just confined to Maori culture.

Didn’t we see other Pacific islanders doing something similar during this RWC?

The warrior bands / classes spent a lot of time throwing shapes (or shade if you like), and then ‘saving it for another day’, because, had they spent all their time fighting, there would not be much left of the warrior class, which could only reproduce itself slowly.

As Dr X mentions, international sport as an alternative to war is to be cautiously celebrated.

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6. Tomboktu - October 19, 2019

On Deputy Dooley’s newest woes, Steve White has done nice digging in the video archives.

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EWI - October 20, 2019

Suspension from FF (for Dooley) is too little punishment – really deserves to be suspension from the Dáil for this sort of contempt.

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irishelectionliterature - October 20, 2019

Lisa Chambers voted for Data Calleary too. I’d say there’s a load of poor divils spending the next few days looking at Dail videos, votes and comparing the two.
At the moment the pressure is on FF , I presume that they are hoping other parties were at it too.
Regardless, it’s an incredibly serious blunder. Could result in some serious trouble for those involved.

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WorldbyStorm - October 20, 2019

+1 to both your comments – this could be really problematic and if it’s restricted to FF it’s a terrible look for that party.

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7. Paddy Healy - October 20, 2019

Boris Johnson and EU Have agreed to Remove Legally Binding Regulation of Workers Rights from the Withdrawal Agreement! https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
This will expose workers in the Six Counties.  Johnson has long denounced EU legislation protecting workers rights. He said that it is costing British Employers 8.5 Billion per year!
Any word from Northern Committee of ICTU ???

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tafkaGW - October 21, 2019

Yep – this deal is a clear indication of what will happen in Brexitania after Brexit: a rapid race to the bottom.

And I can’t swear the Eton con-man won’t get it through this week.

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CL - October 22, 2019

But will not NI continue to be subject to EU regulations, unlike Britain, which is why the DUP oppose the deal.?

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tafkaGW - October 23, 2019

Yes NI will, if the deal goes through. But Britain will be subject to massive deregulation.

We owe workers in Britain our solidarity against this deal.

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8. Paddy Healy - October 20, 2019

Gene Kerrigan: ‘Ireland:Where our children eat from the pavement’
Our ruling parties’ obsession with free market ideology has now taken us to a truly obscene place, writes Gene Kerrigan
Sunday Independent October 20 2019 https://wp.me/pKzXa-wc
Coveney’s speech, containing nothing of substance, came after the notorious image appeared online and in the media of “Sam” – the five-year-old, sitting with his back to the camera on a Dublin pavement, with a sheet of cardboard on the ground in front of him. The cardboard is his table, from which he is eating a pasta meal.

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9. Paddy Healy - October 22, 2019

Cllr Dónal Ó Cofaigh, Fermanagh, Breaks With Socialist Party : Joins Breakaway new CWI Section in Ireland which is allied  to  the Socialist Party of England and Wales led by Peter Taffe
STATEMENT ON THE REFOUNDING OF THE IRISH SECTION OF THE COMMITTEE FOR A WORKERS INTERNATIONAL (CWI).  https://wp.me/pKzXa-1fv
Drogheda, 20 October 2019  By Committee for a Workers’ International (CWI) IRELAND

BACKGROUND
The Irish section of the Committee for a Workers’ International (CWI) was refounded at a conference on Sunday 20th October.

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pettyburgess - October 22, 2019

Well that’s the second split from this row. I’m told that there will be a third.

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Jolly Red Giant - October 22, 2019

I have made more than a dozen attempts to post on the various topics around this over the last few weeks – my comments don’t appear after posting – here we will try again.

All the ‘splits’ are done – well less than 10% of the SP membership.

And despite the above statement – nobody was expelled – resignation emails were even sent.

The end result of all of this is that maybe 10% of the active membership of the CWI went with the Taaffe group – the rest remained with the CWI. The CWI now has sections in more than 30 countries and members in another dozen. Taaffe’s group has only one group with more than 100 members – E&W – and majority of their remaining 10/12 groups have less than a dozen members.

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pettyburgess - October 22, 2019

”I have made more than a dozen attempts to post on the various topics around this over the last few weeks – my comments don’t appear after posting – here we will try again.”

A grave tragedy

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WorldbyStorm - October 22, 2019

Ah, got that JRG. The problem was the links in the comments were having them go into Spam. I’ve fixed that and unblocked the last one you posted. You should email me direct if that happens again.

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WorldbyStorm - October 22, 2019

And here’s the thread with your comments.

https://cedarlounge.wordpress.com/2019/10/08/the-latest-split/

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tafkaGW - October 23, 2019

So just to get this straight: Your CWI is the “CWI-Majority”, and Taaffe’s is “CWI Refounded”.

So in Germany the SAV are with you and Sol are with Taaffe. Have I got that wrong? I’m just going by the Wikipedia article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Committee_for_a_Workers%27_International#Sections

The one on Taaffe seems to be well out of date, or perhaps consistent with his version of history.

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greatbigeejit - October 23, 2019

Yes. The SP Ireland is the CWI Majority. The SP England led by Taaffe is the CWI Refounded. The SAV in Germany is with the Majority, the SOL with the Refounded.

“CWI Ireland”, the new splinter, is with the Refounded. To add to the confusion the SP has just set up their own CWI Ireland Facebook page, like a dog urinating to mark it’s territory. From this we can safely conclude that this split, unlike the other two, is not going to be at all amicable or civilized.

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

Looks like it. Cheers for the overview.

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tafkaGW - October 23, 2019

I can’t work out which splinter the second Irish splinter came from…

“my brane hurtzzzz!!!”

Which one is P. Murphy with again? Or is he with none?

And what is the smallest possible splinter? Surely one person can be in two, or even four minds? Has the quark of the Leninist party been discovered?

“He’s sitting over there holding a negotiation with himself.”

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

PM is with RISE, the original splinter of this particular splintering (if = we are to take the word of them all about a years discussion) and best! 🙂

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CL - October 23, 2019

What is the position of each splinter group on the critical issue of whether the USSR was a deformed worker state or state capitalist?
Until this vital question is resolved it is difficult to see how the Irish working class can advance.

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greatbigeejit - October 23, 2019

TafkaGW, all of the splinters are splits from the SP/CWI Majority. Murphy is with RISE, which is not affiliated to any version of the CWI.

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10. Paddy Healy - October 22, 2019

Comment on Facebook on SP SPLITS
Helena Sheehan So it’s a 3-way split in Ireland then?

Donal O’Cofaigh
Donal O’Cofaigh Four.

Helena Sheehan
Helena Sheehan Donal O’Cofaigh How so?

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cc - October 24, 2019

vv

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11. roddy - October 22, 2019

That’s their only elected rep in the 6 counties gone then.

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12. Paddy Healy - October 22, 2019

Former Drogheda Socialist Party Councillor Ciarán McKenna has published the statement of the “refounded” Irish section of CWI

There are about 70 likes and almost 40 shares of the Statement on the new CWI Irish section website.
What is going on in “Cross-Community Labour Alternative” in The Six-Counties???

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13. Paddy Healy - October 22, 2019

New Breakaway Organisation from SP Needs to Explain this comment in its statement:

“Wider disagreements which became apparent during the debate included the leadership’s failure to take a clear socialist stance in opposition to the neo-liberal European Union, the threat of a hard border in Ireland, and their increasingly imbalanced position in regard to the National Question.”

Has the SP Leadership become tainted with nationalism???

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pettyburgess - October 22, 2019

Apparently it’s the other way around. Taaffe’s side think they’ve gone orange.

Also it seems that the third split has already happened but hasn’t been announced.

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WorldbyStorm - October 22, 2019

So let me get this straight, Ciarán McKenna went with the Taafe CWI? Quite an interesting split(s), whatever its/their size.

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14. roddy - October 22, 2019

Anyone who breaks from SP tends to ditch neo unionism.Within days Clare Daly was referencing Bobby Sands.

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15. Paddy Healy - October 23, 2019

Could the Northern Ireland  Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions Urgently Clarify the Position in Relation to Employment Law in Norther Ireland During the “Withdrawal period” of UK from EU and thereafter??
Employment Law in NI  https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
It is not as simple as saying EU Labour Law will Continue in NI but not in the Rest of the UK!!!

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

that’s a great question.

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16. Paddy Healy - October 23, 2019

I have sent the following message by email
Attention Patricia King, Gen Sec ICTU, Susan Fitzgerald, Donal Ó Cofaigh Unite The Union
Anne Speed Unison

From Paddy Healy, Former President TUI 086-4183732

Could the Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions Urgently Clarify the Position in Relation to Employment Law in Norther Ireland During the “Withdrawal period” of UK from EU and thereafter??
Employment Law in NI
Further Elaboration of Question and links https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit

It is not as simple as saying EU Labour Law will Continue in NI but not in the Rest of the UK!!!
Paddy Healy, Former President, TUI

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17. Alibaba - October 23, 2019

Last Saturday I read a favourable review of a book called ‘Burned: The story behind the North’s ‘cash-for-ash’ scandal’. About bloody time I was thinking, and so little media interest so far. Sorry to say I can’t provide you with the link, as it’s subscribe only and I don’t do that. It seems the author, Sam McBride, gives a verdict of ‘Rank dysfunctionality’ on the Renewable Heating debacle and Stormont power sharing dynamic and though ‘The DUP fares worst’ Sinn Féin apparently comes in for some critique.

I wondered: why would they publish a book before the Renewable Heating Inquiry issues its report? Because it will be a fraud I concluded.

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

I was actually thinking of buying it if I can find a cheapish edition. I think you’re right too, the inquiry may well leave a lot to be desired.

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18. roddy - October 23, 2019

Ali,RHI is a DUP scheme from start to finish and the only reason SF ” comes in for some critique” is that McBride writes for the vilest organ on this island – “the newsletter” which is worse than the worst British tabloid in its coverage of the North.He may have it in for the DUP for some reason but the editorial and journalistic standards of the rag he writes for is rabid unionism at its worst.

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Alibaba - October 23, 2019

Fair enough. Didn’t know this. I will take that into consideration when I get the book, as I’m dropping hints to a few relatives about a possible Christmas pressie.

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

Anyone keen to get an ebooks version, and not Amazon, can find it on ebooks.com and very reasonably priced. That’s interesting roddy, I’d seen that re McBride, but does look like the book is a good critique of the DUP.

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yourcousin - October 24, 2019

Sam McBride is one of the best writers coming out of the PUL tradition up north. And I do read them all from Owen Polley, Ben Lowry, Alex Kane to RDE, and EH. His stuff on Brexit and RHI is as good as it gets. I fully intend to get “Burned”.

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19. Paul Culloty - October 23, 2019

Rather bizarre that UK attitudes to trans rights have been far more regressive than those prevailing here – and a schism has emerged in the British LGBT community:

https://www.pinknews.co.uk/2019/10/23/lgb-alliance-facing-backlash-from-lesbians-gays-bisexuals/amp/

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GearóidGaillimh - October 23, 2019

There’s a good piece on it here:

This kind of politics is very marginal within left and LGBT circles, in Ireland, thankfully.

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

+1 It is interesting, and a bit depressing. Any thoughts as to why it has taken a different approach here?

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WorldbyStorm - October 23, 2019

Btw, in fairness read some of the leading lights of US second wave feminism – such as Mary Daly, and there was a strongly anti-trans strand there. Depressing that too because MD was an interesting thinker in other ways.

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GearóidGaillimh - October 24, 2019

I’m not sure – perhaps individuals like Germaine Greer have an impact on UK feminism in this instance and there aren’t analogous figures here.

There are individual activists in Ireland who take this line. My boyfriend was telling me about arguments he had with some PBP members (he’s a member too) who were pushing the so-called ‘TERF’ line. However, they are a distinct minority within PBP which has a pro-trans rights view.

The Morning Star seems to be associated with this politics too – I’ve seen WP and CPI members online both advocate the TERF position and support trans rights.

The Gender Recognition Act passed the Oireachtas with very little attention, apart from some posthumous controversy Graham Linehan tried to stir up on Prime Time a few months ago. The fact the likes of Iona and Ronan Mullen were very quiet in their opposition to it suggests they didn’t think public opposition is very significant.

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WorldbyStorm - October 24, 2019

That’s interesting, it sounds very plausible. Doesn’t it say it all how the NYT article noted how some of them are cosying up with the hard right in the US? That’s not going to end well. I hesitate to say this but could it be people are perhaps a little more easy going here, or perhaps it’s a social media thing? I’d noted the Mumsnet stuff and how toxic that was over the years, and I certainly think the impact of the sceptic stuff sounds about right (checking out parts of the ‘new’ atheism and so on there’s a really hard edged kind of unpleasant aspect to some involved).So perhaps it’s just a mix of a whole bunch of influences. That’s interesting what your boyfriend heard but like you my sense of PBP is they’re broadly speaking pretty chilled (in a good way!).

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tafkaGW - October 24, 2019

It remains a big issue in German feminism, unfortunately.

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20. Paddy Healy - October 24, 2019

Multinational Closures
Gross over-dependence of Irish Economy on Multi-nationals Coming Home to Roost  https://wp.me/pKzXa-18R
Don’t Believe the “Explanations”. The real question is why products being manufactured in Ireland but coming to the end of their usefulness were not replaced in Ireland by manufacture of new  products. Why are some Novartist “Global Services” being moved to Asia?
The answer is the imminence of BEPS2.0  Details at the link.

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tafkaGW - October 24, 2019

You are absolutely on the money to highlight this Paddy.

Even ignoring the ‘take from the poor to give to the rich’ nature of the scam, basing the RoI economy and tax income on corporate tax avoidance/evasion was never going to work for ever.

It’s going to effect the RoI economy negatively at least as much as Brexshit.

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Paddy Healy - October 24, 2019

You are correct. It was obvious that making multi-national tax avoidance the main driver of the economy would not last indefinitely. This has removed all vestiges of economic sovereignty as RoI is now completely at the mercy of the large countries.

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tafkaGW - October 24, 2019

How much in total of theft from the public purse has the RoI facilitated? 10s of €billions certainly, if not upwards of 100.

That could all have been spending on de-carbonisation, health, education in places from which the corporation tax was robbed.

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21. Roger Cole - October 24, 2019

Ken Mayers(82) & Tarak Kauff (76)are two US Veterans for Peace who have had their passports confiscated while awaiting trial and are effectively in exile. There is a party for them (admission free) on Monday 28th of October from 8.00pm in McLoughlins Bar, 73 Upper Georges Street, Dún Laoghaire. Plenty of music and it promises to be a good night. These guys deserve a great party, so spread the word and enjoy the craic

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22. Paddy Healy - October 25, 2019

The Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe has warned “disruptive” change (BEPS2.0) is coming to Ireland’s corporation tax.
Jack Quann, Newstalk https://wp.me/pKzXa-18R
He was speaking at an IBEC event in Dublin on Friday night.
On Friday, Mr Donohoe said: “The ongoing work at the OECD (BEPS2.0) will result in further substantial alterations to the international tax architecture.
Ireland’s corporate tax rate, of 12.5%, is well behind others such as the UK (19%), Italy (24%), the USA (27%) and France (33.3%).
In 2013, OECD and G20 countries developed a package of 15 measures to tackle avoidance caused by tax base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS1).

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23. Paddy Healy - October 26, 2019

EU Mulls Brexit Delay as Leak suggests Johnson aims to Cut Workers’ Rights—Press Association,Saturday, October 26, https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
There are fears in some quarters of the EU – and especially in Berlin – that Boris Johnson is preparing to reform Britain into “Singapore-on-Thames”, a low-tax, lightly regulated economy on the edge of Europe, once it has left.
According to the FT’s report, the leaked Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) document said the way the political declaration – the agreement setting out the aims of the future trade negotiations between the UK and the EU – had drafted the workers’ rights and environmental protection commitments left “room for interpretation”.
Labour shadow Brexit minister Jenny Chapman said the documents, which reportedly had Downing Street input, “confirm our worst fears”.
She said: “Boris Johnson’s Brexit is a blueprint for a deregulated economy, which will see vital rights and protections torn up.”

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Paddy Healy - October 28, 2019

From BasilMiller on Facebook: This is exactly what Andrew Marr of the BBC suggested was the real motive behind Cameron’s Brexit poll when he gave a lecture in Dublin back in the summer.
The difference with Singapore being that everything except financial services would be wound down, leaving an even more super rich class of wealthy, many of them non-Brits, ironically enough, and a totally impoverished precariat underclass clinging on for dear life — or becoming migrants from their own land.

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24. CL - October 26, 2019

“The British government is planning to diverge from the EU on regulation and workers’ rights after Brexit, despite its pledge to maintain a “level playing field” in prime minister Boris Johnson’s deal, according to an official paper shared by ministers this week….

Mr Johnson’s deal leaves the UK with freedom to set its own regulatory standards from the end of its post-Brexit transition period, which runs to the end of 2022 at the latest. But the EU has warned that Britain’s prospects of getting an ambitious trade deal with Brussels depend on it continuing to uphold robust rules….

The new deal is very different to Theresa May’s, in which the UK made a legal commitment not to roll back EU regulatory standards in areas such as social and environmental protections as long as her “backstop” plan for preventing a hard Irish border was needed….

Under Mr Johnson’s deal, the legally binding “level playing field” provisions that remain in the exit treaty are almost exclusively limited to Northern Ireland”
https://www.ft.com/content/5eb0944e-f67c-11e9-9ef3-eca8fc8f2d65

“Jeremy Corbyn the party leader — who has called for an election at least 35 times since 2017 — faces fresh accusations of dithering over whether or not to force an election in two days’ time….
For many of Mr Corbyn’s most prominent supporters, the indecision is baffling. Although Labour trail Mr Johnson’s Conservatives in the latest polls, they believe that he could close the gap by campaigning vigorously on non-Brexit issues — such as austerity — in the same way he did in 2017…
Most backbench Labour MPs currently fear that embracing a general election could see the party lose scores of seats….

Yet Labour MPs pushing for an election believe that the EU’s likely resistance to an extension beyond January 31 means that unless Brexit happens soon the UK will need to go to the polls in either December or January — so there is no point in delaying.
The indecision has added fuel to speculation that Mr Corbyn could quit within months despite allies’ insistence that he wants to fight the next election even if it is next year.”
https://www.ft.com/content/65d6b5ea-f740-11e9-a79c-bc9acae3b654

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Paddy Healy - October 28, 2019

From Basil Miller: This is exactly what Andrew Marr of the BBC suggested was the real motive behind Cameron’s Brexit poll when he gave a lecture in Dublin back in the summer.
The difference with Singapore being that everything except financial services would be wound down, leaving an even more super rich class of wealthy, many of them non-Brits, ironically enough, and a totally impoverished precariat underclass clinging on for dear life — or becoming migrants from their own land.

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25. Paddy Healy - October 28, 2019

Brexit is Thatcherism 2.0, Andrew Marr Told Ibec-hosted event last February in Dublin Eoin Burke Kennedy , Irish Times,
Full Article https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
“There is an underlying logic to Brexit, but the problem is the people promoting it don’t talk about it in public. They don’t speak about it openly because it would frighten the horses.”
Advocates, he said, believe Britain should pursue an alternative economic model along the lines of the so-called Singaporean model, which would involve deep cuts to corporation tax and a wholesale jettisoning of regulations to attract inward investment.
“You slash corporation tax right down, way below where it is right now, you slash regulations, you tear up your environmental and worker protections .., you go for bust,” he said.
“Now that is the underlying logic behind Brexit and, I think, a lot of Conservatives and certainly Ukippers privately would talk about it being Thatcherism 2.0,” he said. This is why many in the Leave camp were quite comfortable with a hard Brexit, he said.
Mr Marr said such a course of action was extremely high risk as it would involve massive cuts to the social spending that sustained the National Health Service (NHS) and the UK welfare state, as revenues from corporation tax would be much lower.

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Daniel Rayner O'Connor - October 28, 2019

And, of course, Paddy, this would be facilitated by American health business taking the burden of the NHS off the hands of the British taxpayer, as Mr trump suggested it might.

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26. Paddy Healy - October 29, 2019

Why have Irish Media Not Picked UP on This Earlier? https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
Guardian: Brexiteers want Britain to be Singapore on Thames
Why the Singapore model won’t work for the UK post-Brexit
The city state has a strange appeal to some Tories yet even Singapore’s prime minister doubts its approach would work in Britain Patrick Wintour, Guardian, Wed Jan 2 2019
British Minister,Jeremy Hunt arrived at the Fullerton hotel in Singapore to deliver his address as part of the International Institute for Strategic Studies Fullerton Lecture.

The article by Eoin Burke Kennedy in the Irish Times in February 2019 made little or no waves
Now Johnson has got EU Labour and Environmental Protections taken out of the legally binding Withdrawal Agreement!!!

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WorldbyStorm - October 30, 2019

It’s crackers, isn’t it, trying to make Britain the equivalent of a city state? The difference in scale, etc. But that’s what concerns me about the plan because if they can do this in one major economy of that size, not the outcome, but the attempt to get there, Thatcherism 2.0 as noted by yourself, then that in itself is a victory of sorts for them.

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Paddy Healy - October 30, 2019

Yes. Germany Fears that Its Businesses will be undercut by a low pay, Low corporation tax, no protection for workers, extreme market driven economy in post-Brexit UK
EU Mulls Brexit Delay as Leak suggests Johnson aims to Cut Workers’ Rights-Press Association, Saturday, October 26, https://wp.me/sKzXa-brexit
“There are fears in some quarters of the EU – and especially in Berlin – that Boris Johnson is preparing to reform Britain into “Singapore-on-Thames”, a low-tax, lightly regulated economy on the edge of Europe, once it has left.”

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27. Joe - October 30, 2019

Can’t find Signs of Hope so I’ll put this here.
A sign of hope: the demos/uprisings in Lebanon and Iraq. Being reported as non-sectarian or cross-sect movements for more democracy, fairer government. Socialist revolutions I suppose they ain’t but a small sign of hope nonetheless. Yes we have no bananas.

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CL - October 30, 2019

Worldwide leaderless protests.
What’s remarkable about the upsurge in Iraq is that it is Shia districts confronting a Shia government; it is not sectarian.
https://www.democracynow.org/2019/10/29/headlines/iraq_death_toll_from_month_of_anti_government_protests_tops_220

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CL - October 30, 2019

“Despite their disparate grievances, some common threads do bind today’s rebellions together….
The majority of those protesting now are the children of the financial crisis – a generation that has come of age during the strange and febrile years after the collapse of a broken economic and political orthodoxy, and before its replacement has emerged….
the aftermath of the crash has cracked the entrenched structures that had evolved to detach citizens from active participation in politics – be that through authoritarian systems or via an institutional consensus on the inevitability of market logic and technocratic management. Amid widespread economic and social failure, it has become harder than ever for elites to justify power, even on their own terms….
The problem for governments is that there is no longer an established centre ground to snap back to, and their opponents know it – which is why so many of those involved in the current mobilisations will not settle for token concessions from the authorities….
In many places, grassroots victory – and radical political transformation – feels to many like the only possible resolution, lending clashes an “all or nothing” antagonism and urgency that is hard to roll back.
What has intensified this urgency is the backdrop of looming ecological catastrophe….
the kids being handcuffed, building barricades, and fighting their way through teargas in 2019 all entered adulthood after the end of the end of history.”
https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/this-wave-of-global-protest-is-being-led-by-the-children-of-the-financial-crash-1.4065862

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