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Nudge nudge May 27, 2020

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Behavioural scientists get a bad rap in a time of nudge theory, and likely rightly so. But interesting to see their attitudes to the following:

Members of a government behavioural science advisory group have expressed concern that the revelations that Dominic Cummings appears to have broken the UK’s coronavirus restrictions and the government’s subsequent handling of the crisis has undermined the government’s authority and could encourage people to break the rules themselves.

And hardly surprisingly:

“The actions of Cummings, and of Johnson and other cabinet ministers subsequently, have been perceived by the UK public to show that there is one rule for those close to the government and another for the rest of us – i.e., a lack of fairness and equity,” says Susan Michie, a health psychologist at University College London. “This is extremely damaging, as collective solidarity is very important for maintaining trust.”

Michie has been a member of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours (SPI-B), which advises the government on how best to get the public to stick to measures recommended by medical or epidemiological experts.

In February, a SPI-B report stressed that a “sense of collectivism” would be important for maintaining public order, saying that a sense that “we are all in this together” would avoid increasing tensions, promote social norms, and lead to self-policing within communities.

Well, no surprise that a portion of the ‘elite’ would act in certain ways.

“The actions of Cummings, and of Johnson and other cabinet ministers subsequently, have been perceived by the UK public to show that there is one rule for those close to the government and another for the rest of us – i.e., a lack of fairness and equity,” says Susan Michie, a health psychologist at University College London. “This is extremely damaging, as collective solidarity is very important for maintaining trust.” Michie has been a member of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behaviours (SPI-B), which advises the government on how best to get the public to stick to measures recommended by medical or epidemiological experts. In February, a SPI-B report stressed that a “sense of collectivism” would be important for maintaining public order, saying that a sense that “we are all in this together” would avoid increasing tensions, promote social norms, and lead to self-policing within communities.

As EUREFERENDUM.COM noted, there were clear questions to be answered after Cummings press conference (as well, as EUR also noted the bizarre aspect of a government advisor giving a press conference/statement from where he did).

In a way the most astounding aspect of this is that we remain within a global pandemic, and yet, in so many areas people act as if it were business (I use the term quite deliberately) as usual.

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