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This Weekend I’ll be Listening to… Some Jazz October 24, 2020

Posted by irishelectionliterature in This Weekend I'll Mostly Be Listening to....
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I lived in Cork for a period in the 90’s and the Jazz weekend was always a highlight. Not that I got to see much Jazz but there would be some amount drunk and the place was hopping. Friends would come down for the weekend and for many in Cork and beyond it was the highlight of the year. The October bank holiday weekend is traditionally Jazz Weekend, so it’s an awful pity we won’t have the same at all this year with Covid.

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1. WorldbyStorm - October 24, 2020

Jazz is interesting, tend to go through phases of listening to it and then little or none for months. Some great picks above in your post.

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2. Liberius - October 24, 2020

If we’re talking jazz then I’ve finally got something to contribute to this column, I listen to various types of jazz on a regular basis though most of what I listen to isn’t the classics but more modern stuff from mostly Dutch & German groups with a few others like the Danish bassist Jasper Høiby (& his Phronesis band), the Swedish trombonist Nils Landgren or French Saxophonist Sophie Alour being regulars on my playlists. Anyway here are 4 songs from Kraak & Smaak, The New Cool Collective and Club des Belugas which I’ve been listening to regularly in the last half year.

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WorldbyStorm - October 24, 2020

Like the first and last particularly.

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3. alanmyler - October 24, 2020

We went down a couopke if times to the Jazz festival. Not that I’d any interest in jazz, buy the craic was good. The brother in law used to love be near Bandon, and held a big party every October holiday weekend, so we’d go for that too. Great times. And very appropriate that you’re remembering it here with this post. Things we miss in the covid, eh. Speaking of which we had a house party at home last night, just myself herself and our youngest. We all needed it. Just to blow out the frustrations. Hanging today though. But worth it. The advantage of rural living, the music was turned up to 11 on the dial and no complaints from neighbours. Happy bank holiday weekend comrades. To better times ahead.

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4. sonofstan - October 24, 2020

I worked at ‘the jazz’ quite a few times as a stage manager at the Everyman. So good shows, but a lot of dross, and endless choruses of ‘the Saints’ from terrible Dixieland bands next door in the Metropole could soon curdle the appetite. Even thinking about it makes me grumpy 😦

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sonofstan - October 24, 2020

And I like jazz ….

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gypsybhoy69 - October 26, 2020

I like jazz too particularly Kamasi of late. But sos at some stage I’m going to have to get you to explain the Doors observation you made weeks ago, Churchillian I believe. Not mad about Jim the person but I still love the tunes, I’m in my 50’s, why is that deemed wrong?

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sonofstan - October 26, 2020

Much of it is Jim: the ‘I’m deep and dangerous’ persona and the sheer humourlessness and egotism of it all.
Nik Cohn had his number (writing in 1969)

Musically though, he’s no great singer and the Doors are no great group. – they’ve made a couple of strong hard rock singles, they use some potent riffs, they’re strictly competent, but when you get inside their album, their range is minimal and some of Morrison’s more poetical songs are dire. […]really, they’re another case of a solid rock band, sexy but unclever, being ruined by their compulsion to get into Art

For me, he’s up there with Cohen and Cave as a trinity of people in rock music whose sense of themselves as sensitive and poetic artists far exceeds any actual ability as songwriters.

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WorldbyStorm - October 26, 2020

It’s weird, that would almost move me to an Unfairly Dismissed defence of them. I actually agree with everything you say, and yet, I kind of think that there was space, even a necessity, for something that was humourless at that point – that pop was shifting into rock and that the terrain opening up needed to have many different and sometimes difficult and/or annoying aspects to it (to add to your Cohn line, here’s Christgau’s take on the original album ‘I admit that some of the tunes retain considerable nostalgic appeal, but there’s no way I can get around it–Jim Morrison sounds like an asshole. ‘ and this on Morrison Hotel ‘ “The future’s uncertain and the end is always near” is just the Lizard King’s excuse for mingling with the proles who “get on down,” but it sure beats the Anaïs Nin tribute for originality and aptness of thought. Still, the band is rocking tighter than it ever has, Robbie Krieger’s phrasing keeps things moving, and Morrison’s gliding vocal presence–arty and self-absorbed though it may be–provides focus. He’s not the genius he makes himself out to be, so maybe his genius is that he doesn’t let his pretensions cancel out his talent.’). I’m no fan of The End, but on balance I kind of like the groove ofnthe band overall and can ignore Morrison’s absurdity (though watching old footage of him performing on tv his narcissism is difficult to take!). It’s like GB69 says, the tunes are pretty great. But then Morrisson had the advantage of three pretty great musicians behind him. Though not so great that it was a good idea to release non-Morrisson Doors albums after he died. Definitely not so great.

I’m with you on Cave, and Cohen too I guess. I’ve always felt they’re overrated, at least Cave after the first couple of albums when he blanded out his sound. And his lyrical concerns always sounded overwrought, to put it mildly.

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sonofstan - October 26, 2020

Did you see the ‘Doors’ with Ian Astbury show?

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gypsybhoy69 - October 26, 2020

I think I’ll get me coat. I had tickets for Cave this year. Haven’t seen him before but there’s one or two songs I really like so on that basis I wanted to see him and herself really wanted the tickets as a birthday present.
Remember being in Crete in 2006 and being in a shop when a Cohen record came on and the owner who I guessed was an American hippy who’d settled there being very discourteous about Cohen which I’ guessing was from personal experience.
Again there’s one or two tunes of his that anybody I would imagine be proud to call their own.

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sonofstan - October 26, 2020

Sorry, no offence intended. 🙂
Was in a bit of strop this AM.

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gypsybhoy69 - October 26, 2020

No offence taken sos. Genuinely interested in your take on things.

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WorldbyStorm - October 26, 2020

No I didn’t see the Astbury incarnation. Was it any good?

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sonofstan - October 26, 2020

It was odd – I know bands can work with new singers replacing the old, but this was even less convincing that ‘Queen’. For some reason I remember thinking that even with half of the original band, they sounded nothing like themselves.

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WorldbyStorm - October 26, 2020

I hadn’t reevaluated The Doors at that stage! So it wasn’t on my radar. I like the Cult but they do the Cult best. It allways seemed an odd swerve.

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sonofstan - October 26, 2020

Funny, I always thought the Cult were from Leeds, but they’re not really: Astbury was based in Bradford, Duffy is a Manc. But this city was definitely Goth ground zero and you still see the odd middle-aged bloke around here with thinning hair dyed black and those boots with strange bits of metal attached walking the streets looking for the eighties.

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WorldbyStorm - October 26, 2020

Goths will always be with us so it seems.

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crocodileshoes - October 26, 2020

This is not so much ‘unfairly dismissed’ as ‘universally overrated’. I’d agree re Morrison and Cohen. A few Cave songs have hit the spot but SOS’s assessment I won’t disagree with. I’d add another ‘sensitive and poetic’ artist who’s probably even more critically unscathed but the hagiography leaves me baffled : Kate Bush.

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WorldbyStorm - October 26, 2020

Oh Jesus, don’t say that… Universally Overrated could be yet another series of posts! 🙂

I hvae a similar feeling re KB. Don’t hate her stuff, like some of the songs, but overall I don’t get how she is so lauded.

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5. Tomboktu - October 24, 2020

This BBC documentary from 2009 might interest

Narrator: In 1959, four major jazz albums were made that changed music forever:
Miles Davis, ‘Kind of Blue’,
Dave Brubeck’s ‘Time Out’,
Charles Mingus, ‘Mingus Ah Um’, and
Ornette Coleman’s ‘The Shape of Jazz to Come’.

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