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Public attitudes in the UK to the lockdown November 26, 2020

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Uncategorized.
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Worth mentioning this, from an article by Torsten Bell in the Observer at the weekend. Writing about Farage’s latest initiative, a ‘Reform’ party positioned against lockdown, Bell argues that his populist instict’ has failed him this time, in part because:

The more interesting conclusion is that the public aren’t serial sceptics certainly having voted Leave doesn’t make you a lockdown sceptic. While age was a strong predictor of how you voted on Brexit, the same cannot be said for those who think lockdown has gone too far (which includes one in five of under-24s and over-65s).

And:

There’s also the fact that more than seven in 10 Britons support lockdown. So, scepticism does not appear to be a lasting habit.

A block of somewhere between 10 and 30% would still be quite a strong cohort in political terms. Whether it would be possible to marshall that level of support behind a single formation seems less clear cut.

But perhaps the more interesting aspect is that so many still support lockdown measures.

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1. sonofstan - November 26, 2020

“A block of somewhere between 10 and 30% would still be quite a strong cohort in political terms. Whether it would be possible to marshall that level of support behind a single formation seems less clear cut”

A block of more then 30% voted against SSM and repealing the 8th. No real signs of them being organised in anything more sustained.

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WorldbyStorm - November 26, 2020

True. And I guess to riff on that, given they have the Tory party already in situ why bother with some new untested formation when all the pressure they need to apply can be brought to the people actually in government.

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2. Joe - November 26, 2020

I haven’t been following it in detail. But I see references in the British press to ‘northern leaders’ and ‘northern mayors’ being opposed to Johnson (central govt) putting their areas into various harder levels of lockdown. I may be wrong but I think these northern leaders and northern mayors include both Tory MPs (the ones that won the seats from Labour last time for the first time in living memory) and Labour MPs and Labour mayors.
If I’m right about the Labour end of that, more proof, if it was needed, that the LP over there is pretty much fooked.

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sonofstan - November 26, 2020

All the mayors, bar the west midlands guy, are Labour and almost all of the city MPs in Manchester, Liverpool and here are Labour. TBF, Burnham and others are mostly complaining about the lack of aid, not necessarily disputing the lockdown itself – Tory MPs are though.
The ‘red wall’ seats that went blue are almost all in smaller towns, not the bigger cities. On that though, you’ll get a lot of dark stories about Labour local government in northern cities: from what I’ve been told, Liam Lawlor would have been right at home on Teeside.

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Joe - November 26, 2020

On that last point, yeah, I guess it’s always gonna be a problem where there’s one-party rule over a long period. A pity the only alternative to the corrupt party was the right. But the LP have to take the blame for allowing it to happen.

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sonofstan - November 26, 2020

It’s only since living up here that the true extent of the north south divide has become clear to me. Leeds is scarely further from London than Cork from Dublin, but the sense of being on the other side of the moon as far as the metrolops is concerned is much greater. I suspect this holds for Labour people in Central office just as much as it does for their Tory equivalents. Labour seats in the north are useful for parachuting in future high-flyers, but you couldn’t live up there….

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Colm B - November 26, 2020

Same re Scotland except the Labour machine was even more corrupt and decrepid and has now largely collapsed. Luckily it was replaced by another vaguely centre left party, the SNP, rather than the Tories.

Rather predictably, the SNP displays the same vices of the over-dominant party: cautious centrism, rampant careerism, taking for granted mass of voters etc. I guess this will continue until independence though
the Greens will provide some sort of pro-indy left critique. Not ideal by any means but could be a lot worse…could be England.

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sonofstan - November 26, 2020

I’m getting interested in Yorkshire independence myself.

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Joe - November 26, 2020

I think the correct response to that is “ay up”. Spelling? Also, is that Yorkshire?!

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Colm B - November 26, 2020

Well now that you mention it:

https://www.yorkshireparty.org.uk/

Weak tea but still centre-leftish, in a sort of SNPish way. Probably makes them more left-wing than Sir Keir definitely-not-Hardy’s New New Labour!

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sonofstan - November 26, 2020

The Yorkshire party are on the verge of appearing serious – a few councillors, but a high profile defector to the Tories in Pontefract, which needs more Tories like Kerry needs more Healy-Raes….

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Paul Culloty - November 26, 2020

You also have the “Northern Independence Party”, but will reserve judgement until it becomes clear whether they move from being a Twitter meme into a fully-fledged movement:

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sonofstan - November 26, 2020

I can see a few problems with that: starting with calling the whole region ‘Northumbria’ and continuing into trying to decide on a capital city. No one else would stand for Manchester, Manchester wouldn’t stand for anywhere else…
Still, the national anthem is obvious

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Colm B - November 26, 2020

And don’t forget this Cornish crew, who’ve been round for ages, have a few cllrs and are a bit to the left as well.

https://www.mebyonkernow.org/

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Michael Carley - November 27, 2020

A one time colleague (whose name might be familiar if you follow certain debates on Corbyn) was in them for a bit. He said their main political activity was “shouting across the Dart”.

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3. sonofstan - November 27, 2020

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