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What you want to say – 27 January 2021 January 27, 2021

Posted by guestposter in Uncategorized.
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As always, following on Dr. X’s suggestion, it’s all yours, “announcements, general discussion, whatever you choose”, feel free.

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1. Klassenkampf Treehugger - January 27, 2021

The reason the the EU is so pissed off with Astra Zeneca is that they reckon 4 million doses of vaccine due to go the the EU were diverted to the UK.

This is, in de Pfeffel’s words “vaccine nationalism”.

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2. EWI - January 27, 2021

How Irish Times is this?

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3. sonofstan - January 27, 2021

HOLYHEAD, Wales — Beneath swirling gray clouds, Bryan Anderson leaned from the cab window of his truck to vent his frustration at the new paperwork that had already delayed his journey through Britain’s second-largest ferry port by half a day.

“It’s a nightmare,” Mr. Anderson said, explaining how he spent hours waiting at a depot 250 miles away for export documents required because of Brexit. The delay meant he reached Holyhead, in Wales, too late for the ferry he planned to take to Dublin, and for the next one, too.

“I am roughly 12 hours behind schedule,” he said as he prepared, finally, to drive aboard the Stena Adventurer to Dublin to drop off a consignment of parcels for Ireland’s mail service.

Fear of hassles and red tape stemming from the introduction of the new rules governing Britain’s trade with the European Union that came into effect on Jan. 1 led to dire predictions of overwhelming gridlock at British ports.

But, so far, the opposite has happened. Apart from hardy souls like Mr. Anderson, truckers are increasingly shunning ports like Holyhead. They are fearful of the mountains of paperwork now required for journeys that last month involved little more than driving on to a ferry in one country and off it in another.

On Thursday, just a couple of dozen other trucks stood waiting for the same ferry as Mr. Anderson in a vast but almost empty port-side parking lot. Holyhead is operating at half its normal capacity and staff have been placed on furlough.

“It’s too much hassle to go through,” Mr. Anderson said.

Stickers appearing here reading #bollockstoBrexit -we told you so

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Paul Culloty - January 27, 2021

Always struck me as bizarre that not only did a constituency with one of the highest percentage of Welsh-speakers and dependent on port trade voted for Brexit, but they compounded matters by electing a Tory MP!

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WorldbyStorm - January 28, 2021

+1 Paul.

What on earth did they expect SoS? It’s heartbreaking to see workers jobs go up in smoke.

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sonofstan - January 28, 2021

I didn’t know that about the Tory MP – it was Plaid for a long time I think?
Mind you, her website doesn’t mention the Conservative party anywhere!

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4. terrymdunne - January 29, 2021

Up-coming Peelers & Sheep podcast episodes in spring 2021 include a three-part pandemic special and another three on the hidden histories of the Irish revolution.

peelersandsheep.ie/blog

Pandemic Special:
The first two episodes are on the social/ecological interfaces behind zoonotic diseases – that’s diseases that spread from animals to humans like the current coronavirus epidemic and the final episode looks at a cultural response to the 1832 cholera outbreak.

The Landscape of Lyme
– looking at the landscape as a creation of human society and the relationship between habitat destruction and lyme disease.

The Forest Frontier and the Factory Farm
– this is all about the zoonotic diseases that spread from the human-made environments of battery farms and forest clear-fell – HIV, ebola, avian flu and swine flu they all make an appearance here. This episode has a focus on the socio-economic context of zoonotic disease.

The Blessed Turf and the Fire from Heaven
– in 1832 the first cholera epidemic ever to reach Europe caused panic – the Irish manifestation of this became known as the blessed turf – a sort of chain letter of magic tokens that went across the country in the space of a week — in one particular area — the Barrow valley — it took a different form more like an insurgent millenarian cult.

Then back to more Hidden Histories of the Irish Revolution:

Dubs, Dirty Shirts and the World Revolution
– where were the Irish regiments of the British Army in 1919‒21? This episode goes from Murmansk to Cairo and Constantinople to India as well as putting the Irish revolution into its global context through some of the scribblings of Sir Henry Wilson (the Longford man who was Chief of the Imperial General Staff).

Dublin County in 1913
– starting just before the famous Lock Out was a movement of farm workers in the rural parts of Dublin – back then the countryside went in as far as Crumlin. Dublin had its own particular agricultural industry with a strong presence of market gardening.

Notes on the Defence of Irish Country Houses
– Colonel George O’Callaghan-Westropp, self-styled as The O’Callaghan, was a county Clare landlord who re-invented himself as a leading activist in the Irish Farmers’ Union. This episode tells his story and also looks at the Farmers’ Union and its clash with the labour movement over attempts to regulate food exports in 1920.

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5. Tomboktu - January 29, 2021

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