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Left Candidates from the 1981 General Election March 26, 2011

Posted by irishelectionliterature in Left Candidates from ....
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As an election junkie , one the the annoying things, is the classification of Small parties into the ‘Independent’ or ‘others’ bracket. Electionsireland.org is a fantastic resource but often smaller parties are not listed or all of their candidates are not listed, especially from the pre internet age.

I’ll do a series of these posts, each covering a different election.

So I’m going to start with the 1981 General Election and list all the candidates from the Socialist Labour Party, The Socialist Party , the CPI and as many Left leaning Independents as I can.

Socialist Labour Party
Noel Browne -Dublin North Central 5031 votes  **Elected
Michael O’Donoghue -Dublin North East 309 votes
Billy Keegan -Dublin North West 473 votes
Matt Merrigan -Dublin North West 209 votes
Ivor Andreas Nolan -Dublin West  63 votes
Dermot Boucher -Dun Laoghaire 575 votes
John Teehan  -Wexford 447 Votes

Communist Party of Ireland
John Montgomery -Dublin West 202 votes
John Curley -Dublin North Central 156 votes

Socialist Party
Eamonn Farrell -Dublin North West 236 votes
Denis O’Connor -Dublin South 335 votes

SFWP candidates are listed here , Joe Sherlock won a seat for them in Cork East.

That 1981 Election also saw the election of two H-Block TDs and of course Left Independent Jim Kemmy in Limerick.

Amongst other Left leaning Independents who stood were Declan Bree , Tony Gregory, Paddy Healy, Anthony Coffey and Joe Harrington. There was also Liz Noonan who stood on a Gay Rights platform in Dublin South East.

The Left vote totals and a few other stats. February 28, 2011

Posted by irishelectionliterature in Uncategorized.
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Just a brief few stats that may be of interest

The ULA polled  59,423 votes getting around 2.7% of the vote nationally and winning five seats.
(Socialist Party 26,770 , People Before Profit 21,551, Declan Bree and Seamus Healy 11,102)

The Workers Party polled 3,056 0.1% of the Vote

Left of Centre Independents polled 55145 votes around 2.5% winning six seats.
(To the List posted last Monday I added in Brian Markham, Sean Connolly Farrell, Robin Wilson, Mick Wallace, Veronica Cawley and one or two others that polled around 200 votes)
(Catherine Connolly may yet win in Galway West)

So over 5% of the vote nationally went Left other than to Sinn Fein or Labour. (that’s assuming I managed to include every Left candidate)
That is around half the vote Labour got in 2007.

Joe Higgins, Mick Murphy and The GAMA Strike February 28, 2011

Posted by irishelectionliterature in The Left.
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Been busy the past week so forgot to post up a link to an article on the excellent Ephemeral Left.  Mick Murphy Diary of the GAMA strike, has text from Mick as well as a documentary on the GAMA strike. Amongst other things it showed the benefit of having Left TDs in the Dail.

 

Nice Logo……..? January 3, 2011

Posted by irishelectionliterature in Irish Politics.
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Saw this on a newsletter I posted from People Before Profit candidate Annette Mooney running in Dublin South East. (her website)
Quite impressed, if it is the logo for the ULA.

 

United Left Alliance Website now Online November 25, 2010

Posted by irishelectionliterature in Irish Politics.
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The website for the United Left Alliance is now up.   www.unitedleftalliance.org

The Alliance will be publicly launched at a rally on Monday 29th November at 7.30pm in the Gresham Hotel, O’Connell St, Dublin.

It involves the Socialist Party, the People Before Profit Alliance, the South Tipperary Workers and Unemployed Action Group and the Independent Socialist group of Declan Bree in Sligo.

Trade Unions hurt Labour: Quinn October 16, 2008

Posted by Garibaldy in Irish Politics, Labour Party, The Left, Trade Unions, Workers' Party.
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A most interesting  report in the Irish Times gives vent to Ruairí Quinn’s real feelings about the broader labour movement. Writing in a new book, State of the Unions, edited by Tim Hastings (which I can’t find a link for) he argues that the Trade Unions harm the Labour Party because the unions expect it to act as their voice in the Oireachtas, while failing to provide sufficient votes and electoral support in return. In addition, he argues that the public blames the Labour Party whenever unions engage in unpopular activity.

What is the significance of this? Possibly none whatsoever. But this is not the first time such sentiments have been voiced by elements of the Labour Party leadership, and it suggests that a Blairite push to negate the influence of the unions as far as possible may not be far off. The timing of the publication is particularly unfortunate given that the Labour movement now more than ever needs a united front. Even though this piece was obviously written some time ago, the credit crunch has been around for a year or more, and it has been obvious that the southern economy was heading for difficulties. It says a lot about the nature of social democracy in the south that at such a time an influential figure like Quinn should chose to say this. There is clearly a declining sense of a labour movement, and it is being replaced with one that there is a political party that is linked to the trade unions financially, and that sometimes agrees with them, but that has distinct and separate interests. It seems silly to raise this debate now.

I don’t want to go on about this, I just wanted to bring it to people’s attention for them to discuss, particularly in terms of what it tells us about the biggest forces in the left in Ireland, and the current difficulties of the left.

On a side point that will be of interest to many here, Quinn reveals that the desire to curb the influence of The Workers’ Party in political and trade union circles was a significant factor in the creation of SIPTU. There has been some discussion of politics and the trade unions past and present in the comments here.

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