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Irish Left Archive: Why we say Stop the Bombing: NATO out of the Balkans, Socialist Workers Party, 1999 March 25, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. nato-out-of-the-balkans.pdf

Please click here to go the Left Archive.

Many thanks to the person who forwarded this and other SWP related materials to the Archive.

An useful 8 page document to add to other SWP materials in the Archive, this strongly criticises the intervention in Yugoslavia in the late 1990s. The pamphlet is broken into short sections under headings such as ‘A Colonial War’, ‘Is Milosevic the new Hitler’, ‘How the Balkans Has Been Used’, ‘The Kosovan Liberation Army’, ‘The Spectre of War Returns’ and so on.

The pamphlet argues that only The Socialist Alternative can bring peace – and argues that interventions have twice functioned to increase support for Milosevic when his government appeared likely to fall. It concludes…

To get this sort of decent society we need to get rid of the capitalist system and those who run it.

Please note: We accept scanned files in good faith. However if files have been posted for or to other online archives previously we would appreciate if we could be informed of that. We are keen to credit same where applicable or simply provide links.

Irish Left Archive: British Strategy in Northern Ireland, Revolutionary Marxist Group, 1974 March 18, 2019

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Irish Left Online Document Archive.
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To download the above please click on the following link. rmg-bri-strat-ni-1975.pdf

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

This 44 page pamphlet issued by the Revolutionary Marxist Group covers a lot of ground. The contents is reprinted from the RMG’s publication The Plough and covers the period 1973 to 1974. The articles are ‘The White Paper – Why it Failed’, ‘Assembly Farce’, ‘After the Loyalist Election Victory’, ‘The Ulster Workers Council Strike’ and ‘Britain’s New Turn’.

Without question this was a pivotal time in the development of the conflict on the island.

The short introduction notes that

In order to understand the dynamic of the struggle and the tasks of revolutionaries it is essential to have a clear and precise analysis of the development of British strategy.

And it argues that:

In a country whose Marxist tradition may be said to have died with Connolly in 1916 the RMG has made a unique contribution in the Irish revolutionary movement, in analysing British strategy and the tasks of revolutionaries.

And in a situation where the Irish revolutionary movement has been isolated from world revolutionary currents, the RMG, through its memberships of the Fourth International has been able to draw on the valuable experience of its comrades in struggles in Argentina, Chile, American, Japan, Germany, Spain, France, Belgium, Italy and many other countries.

Please note: We accept scanned files in good faith. However if files have been posted for or to other online archives previously we would appreciate if we could be informed of that. We are keen to credit same where applicable or simply provide links.

Left Archive: Ripening of Time, Number 13, January 1980 – October 1980 March 11, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. ripening_of_time_13.pdf

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Adding to the collection of Ripening of Time in the Archive, is this, number 13. A 52 page long document the introduction notes that:

In this issue we deal with a number of aspects of the struggle of the working class in Ireland during the 1970s.

In pp.7-22 we examine the growing practice of absenteeism inside the working class. The perspective in this article is to place absenteeism in a context of working class resistance and struggle – a method used borking people as part of their refusal to accept he role fo wage labour subjugated to the rule of capital.

The second article complete the examination of the post World War 2 period, begun in issue 11. It analyses the reorganisation of the economy and the living conditions of the working class through the crisis decade of the 1970s in Ireland.

Two major strikes in the Limerick Shannon Area (one in the 1960s, the other in the 1970s) are the subject of the essay From E.I to Ferenka. This article is in the form of a documentation of the day-to-day events, positions taken and outcome fo these two strikes – on in the E.I. factory the other in Ferenka.

The problem of Democratic Unity was the title of an article written by Roy Johnson, which was printed in Issue 9… A member of the Editorial Collective, Jim Sloane, takes this opportunity to reply to some of the points made by Roy Johnston in that Article.

Finally it notes: our regular features appear with a long review by Les Levidow of a book written by Daniel Guerin: 100 Years of American Labour.

Please note: We accept scanned files in good faith. However if files have been posted for or to other online archives previously we would appreciate if we could be informed of that. We are keen to credit same where applicable or simply provide links.

Left Archive: Class Struggle, Irish Workers Group, No. 3, December 1987 March 4, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. class_struggle_dec87

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

From the Irish Workers Group, another edition of Class Struggle. Noticeably more newspaper like than the edition posted last month this one has 8 pages, is large format and adopts a more tabloid like style.

The banner has ‘The Workers’ Republic’, ‘Women’s Liberation’ and ‘International Socialism’ as the slogans.

The contents covers areas from Education Cuts, featured on the first page, through a critical analysis of Sinn Féin and ‘New Challenge for Women’ in regard to engaging with the ban on abortion information. The centre spread, and the Editorial both critique ‘Guerrilla Warfare’ in the context of Marxism, and in particular the then-recent Enniskillen bombing. And the editorial argues:

The IWG unequivocally condemns the IRA Bombing at Enniskillen on November 8t. Our condemnation has nothing in common with the hypocritical representatives of the ruling classes in these islands and their apologies in the media and elsewhere.

The IWG does not condemn in principle the use of violence as a means of political struggle. Our standpoint, on the contrary, is the revolutionary international working class tradition of armed insurrection by the mass of the working class against capitalism and imperialism.

We condemn it as an act whose consequences cannot but lead, as it already has led, to the consolidation and strengthening of the British and Irish ruling classes.

International affairs sees the publication focus on Nicaragua and the Sandinistas, ‘The Real Limits of Glasnost’ and a report from Austria.

Please note: If files have been posted for or to other online archives previously we would appreciate if we could be informed of that. We are keen to credit same where applicable or simply provide links.

Irish Left Archive: Irish Socialist, Communist Party of Ireland, No. 123, January 1973 February 25, 2019

Posted by WorldbyStorm in Irish Left Online Document Archive, Uncategorized.
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To download the above please click on the following link. irish-socialist-1973.pdf

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

An interesting edition of Irish Socialist from the Communist Party of Ireland. This published in January 1973 argues that after the vote to join the European Economic Community ‘the benefits are: Higher Prices, Profits and Unemployment’. And it argues that ‘the call must be made for the Labour movement to lead a crusade to defend the right of the people of Ireland, North and South to work in their own country’.

The Editorial argues, though, that 1973 is ‘A Year of Hope’ and this because ‘in spite of set-backs, the struggle for democracy, equality and the right of the people to control their own destiny is advancing everywhere. The hysteria of the ruling class, the introduction of anti-democratic legislation, the attempt to hamstring the trade unions, all these things are happening because the bosses see that a new spirit is sweeping the world’.

And it makes the interesting point that twenty years earlier ‘“Socialism” was a word no self-respecting person would use. Now even Fianna Fáil Ministers claim to be Socialists’.

There’s much more, not least an overview of the (Official) Sinn Féin Ard-Fheis, the issues within Unionism, South Africa and Nixon.

Irish Left Archive: What’s Mined is Ours! The Case for the Retention and Development of Irish Minerals under Public Ownership, Union of Students in Ireland, February 18, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. mines-usi.pdf

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

This document – an updated version of an earlier document, issued by the Union of Students in Ireland in 1973 – subtitled “The case for the retention and development of Irish Minerals under Public Ownership” provides evidence of the activist approach of the USI in the 1970s on a broad range of areas.

Indeed the Introduction notes that ‘the USI was amongst the first national organisations to raise the now controversial issue of the development and ownership of Irish mines. Successive National Congresses have called for public ownership and democratic control fo the mineral resources of Ireland. With other sections of the community this Union has been calling for equal educational opportunities and adequate educational facilities and has received answers from successive Ministers of Education to the effect that the country simply cannot afford ‘to cherish all the children fo the nation equally’. A fraction fo the profit from the Navan deposit alone would give the present government the financial means to effect a revolution in the education system throughout this country’.

Interestingly the President of USI at this point was Pat Rabbitte and the Deputy President Kieran Mulvey and the Foreword by them and Pat Brady, the Education Officer argues that the update was necessary due ‘to a demand from the general public…[demonstrating] the wise of many people to discover more of the facts about the true potential of Ireland’s mineral resources’. It notes that David Giles, Colm Regan and Alan Wallace ‘did the research for this bookle.

Irish Left Archive: Class Struggle, Issue no. 10 Apr-Aug 1982, Irish Workers Group February 4, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. class_struggle_apr_82.pdf

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

This edition of Class Struggle joins others in the Archive – it dates from 1982, it encompasses a wide range of subjects in just 44 pages.

It argues that ‘Crisis Deepens for World Capitalism and Stalinism’, examines El Salvador, asks ‘Socialists and Republicans – What basis for unity in action?’. It also examines ‘Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Poland’ and closer to home looks at ‘After the Southern Elections’.

There is no editorial as such, but the article on the February 1982 General Election lays out the position of the IWG clearly. It argues that:

The February General Election… showed as starkly as ever since Partition the outright political treachery of the Labour movement leadership in the disgusting role of the LP and the silence of the TU Leaders. At the same time it warned the Irish bourgeoisie and its financial overlords that its two-party parliamentary system of hoodwink has worn precariously thin. What the elections have not done, however, despite the many claims, os to provide any alternative political voice speaking go rate real needs of the exploited and oppressed.

It criticises those left of the Labour Party:

The newly elected 3 deputies of SFWP and the ‘Left’ TDS T.Gregory and J.Kemmy when faced with the chance to vote against both capitalist nominees for Taoiseach, instead pledged their support to the capitalist parties. In this they squandered a key opportunity to force the capitalist parties either to ally together as the kind of anti-working class government they obit stand for, or else to take full responsibility or another election.

The conclusion is particularly critical of Tony Gregory and argues:

Gregory’s action is one more setback in the principled and unbending struggle for a programme and party truly and independently representing all of the interests of the working class.

One small aspect of the publication is that it lists the illustrations used.

Irish Left Archive: 1798 – Year Of Revolution, Socialist Workers Party, 1998 January 21, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. 1798_year_of_revolution_v2_rescanned.pdf

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

Written by Mark Hewitt, this pamphlet engages with 1798 in 18 pages. It covers a lot of ground, chapters included ‘Ireland in the 18th century’, ‘The Emergence of the United Irishmen’, and ‘Tone and the politics of the United Irishmen’. Other chapters examine the tactics of the United Irishmen, the issue of Reaction on the island and the Rising itself.

The introduction quotes Connolly who wrote that ‘few moments in history have been more consistently misrepresented both by open enemies and professed admirers than that of the United Irishmen’. And it argues against parties like Fianna Fáil attempting to ’stand in Tone’s tradition’.

The conclusion argues that while ‘Some claims that seeking a common class unity between Catholics and Protestants is unrealistic… the UI showed that genuine unity could be forged in revolutionary conditions’.

Wood Quay Occupation News, No. 2, 12 June 1979 January 14, 2019

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To download the above please click on the following link. occupation-news-2-12-june-1979

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

To add to the collection of materials on Wood Quay here is the Occupation News from June 1979. At this stage the site of Wood Quay had been occupied by a variegated group of protesters at the proposed construction of new Civic Offices there by Dublin City Corporation. This document issued by the protesters is a four page publication that touches on a range of issues, including accounts from the occupation, a piece on the local election results of 7th of June which the protesters interpret as being in their favour as well as a piece on ‚’the Voice of the Liberties‚’ from John Gallagher, Chairman of the Liberties Association. This makes the point that for people living in the Liberties it is ‚’houses people want, not office-blocks or a dual carriageway that turn communities into dangerous traffic islands‚’.

The front page notes the local election results:

The news that [Fine Gael] Lord Mayor Paddy Belton had been sacked by the people of his Dublin constituency was unreservedly welcomed behind the barricades here at the Wood Quay site. No-one in Irish public life has opposed preservation more strenuously than Mr. Belton. There can be little doubt that those who suffered his frequent outbursts in the chamber at City hall must feel that Irish political life could only be enriched by the passing of Belton into oblivion.

It continues that:

Our friends who favour the preservation of Wood Quay and the relocation of the Civic Offices have a clear majority in the new City Council.

Irish Left Archive: Fourthwrite, Issue no. 4, Winter 2000/2001, Irish Republican Writers Group December 17, 2018

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To download the above please click on the following link. AP 1970

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Many thanks to the person who forwarded this to the Archive.

This edition of Fourthwrite, published by the Irish Republican Writers Group, appropriately is from the Winter of 2000/2001. At a remove of eighteen years it provides an useful insight into the period after the Good Friday/Belfast Agreement was signed.

The lead article is argues that the Patten report was ‘gutted’ and that ‘the British government is imposing its own version of slicing on the North of Ireland’. It continues ‘in reality there never was any prospect of things being different… control of policing is not an optional extra for a ruling power – it is a fundamental necessity’. It is deeply sceptical of the idea that there will be real change and argues that the British Government ‘has ensured that there has been a unitary police service in NI since partition’ and that this will continue with the ‘same authority’ controlling Special Branch and ‘taking charge of traffic safety, domestic violence incidents and regulation of addictive substances’. And it suggests that for Sinn Féin and the SDLP ‘such decisions [to come to terms with policing] will not be easy… evidence suggests they will wrestle with the dilemma for some time but in the end they will make some form of accommodation with the system’.

The editorial mentions ‘harassment of IRWG members, Anthony McIntyre and Tommy Gorman’ but states that its commitment to continuing publication remains unchanged. And it asks about what tasks continue to face radical Irish Republicanism – ‘is the new republic to be a workers republic’, ‘what economic benchmark do republicans set for the citizens?’, ‘how will republicans adopt an ethical and neutral foreign policy and can a foreign policy be both?’ are questions asked amongst others.

A wide range of contributions will be found in the sixteen pages, with authors as diverse as Paul Bew and Eamon McCann.

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